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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 376-400 out of 716.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
2 Gladstone scientists inducted into the California Academy of Sciences
In an unprecedented move, the California Academy of Sciences today will induct two scientists from the Gladstone Institutes, President R. Sanders "Sandy" Williams, M.D., and Investigator Katherine Pollard, Ph.D., as Academy Fellows, bestowing yet another honor on two of San Francisco's most esteemed scientists.

Contact: Anne Holden
anne.holden@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2534
Gladstone Institutes

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
PLOS Genetics
Unexpected genomic change through 400 years of French-Canadian history
Researchers at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center and University of Montreal have discovered that the genomic signature inherited by today's 6 million French-Canadians from the first 8,500 French settlers who colonized New France some 400 years ago has gone through an unparalleled change in human history, in a remarkably short timescale.
Génome Québec, Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation, Institut de recherche en santé du Canada

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
American Journal of Botany
Microsatellites are repetitive, but the lab work doesn't have to be
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have established a method that increases the ease and affordability of microsatellite marker development -- streamlining the process by reducing the number of steps involved. The new protocol is described in the Oct. issue of Applications in Plant Sciences. In the new protocol, multiple microsatellites can be fluorescently labeled and amplified in the same PCR reaction, significantly reducing the total number of PCR reactions required for each study.

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 6-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
Massive DNA study points to new heart drug targets and a key role for triglycerides
A global hunt for genes that influence heart disease risk has uncovered 157 changes in human DNA that alter the levels of cholesterol and other blood fats -- a discovery that could lead to new medications. Each of the changes points to genes that can modify levels of cholesterol and other blood fats and are potential drug targets. Many of the changes point to genes not previously linked to blood fats, also called lipids.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
NSF grant funds study to unlock secrets of biodiversity
The tropics are home to a far greater diversity of life than any other region on the planet, but the reasons for this disparity have puzzled scientists for centuries. To help shed light on the ultimate causes of biodiversity, the National Science Foundation has awarded $2 million over five years through the Dimensions in Biodiversity program to a group of researchers from five institutions, including the University of Chicago. The collaboration will investigate the biological mechanisms that drive biodiversity in butterflies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
Molecular Cell
Scientists discover new role for cell dark matter in genome integrity
University of Montreal researchers have discovered how telomerase, a molecule essential for cancer development, is directed to structures on our genome called telomeres in order to maintain its integrity and in turn, the integrity of the genome.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
Science
New technique identifies novel class of cancer's drivers
Scientists have revealed nearly 100 genetic variants implicated in the development of cancers such as breast cancer and prostate cancer. The new method designed by the team, described in the journal Science, identified these variants in the under-explored regions of DNA that do not code for proteins, but instead influence activity of other genes. As even more whole genome sequences become available, this approach can be applied to find any potential disease-causing variant in the non-coding regions of the genome.

Contact: Aileen Sheehy
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-92368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 2-Oct-2013
IRICoR and Université de Montréal license a novel program for early-onset morbid obesity to Pfizer
The Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer -- Commercialization of Research and its host institution, the Université de Montréal today announced the licensing to Pfizer Inc. of a novel early-onset morbid obesity pre-clinical program developed at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer.

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases
TGen-led study identifies genes associated with unhealthy liver function
A groundbreaking study of nearly 2,300 extremely obese diabetes patients, led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute, has identified genes associated with unhealthy liver function. This is believed to be the nation's first large-scale genome-wide association study in overweight patients with diabetes.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Nature Methods
Search tool for gene expression databases could uncover therapeutic targets, biological processes
A new computational tool developed by US and Israeli scientists will help scientists exploit the massive databases of gene expression experimental results that have been created over the past decade. Researchers say it could uncover new links between diseases and treatments and provide new insights into biological processes.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
PhytoKeys
The MGC Herbarium: Information source of plant diversity in the Mediterranean
The MGC Herbarium of the University of Malaga (Spain), which contains the impressive 76.000 sheets of vascular plants, is one of the most important resources for understanding the biodiversity in the South of Spain. The basic information about the MGC Herbarium has been published in a recent data paper available through the open access journal PhytoKeys.

Contact: José García-Sánchez
jgarcias@uma.es
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
PeerJ
Scientists who share data publicly receive more citations
A new study finds that papers with data shared in public gene expression archives received increased numbers of citations for at least five years. The large size of the study allowed the researchers to exclude confounding factors that have plagued prior studies of the effect and to spot a trend of increasing dataset reuse over time. The findings will be important in persuading scientists that they can benefit directly from publicly sharing their data.

Contact: Heather Piwowar
hpiwowar@gmail.com
PeerJ

Public Release: 27-Sep-2013
MOgene awarded $1.5 million from US Department of Energy
The MGC project is one of 15 energy projects selected by the ARPA-E to participate in the agency's new REMOTE program -- Reducing Emissions using Methanotrophic Organisms for Transportation Energy.

Contact: Melanie Bernds
mbernds@danforthcenter.org
314-587-1647
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Public Release: 27-Sep-2013
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
New breast cancer imaging technique could cut down on false positives
A joint BYU-Utah research team is developing a new breast cancer screening technique that has the potential to reduce false positives, and, possibly, minimize the need for invasive biopsies. The group has created an MRI device that could improve both the process and accuracy of breast cancer screening by scanning for sodium levels in the breast.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Hollingshead
toddh@byu.edu
801-422-8373
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 26-Sep-2013
Cell
A genetic map for complex diseases
University of Chicago scientists have created one of the most expansive analyses to date of the genetic factors at play in complex diseases such as autism and heart disease by using diseases with known genetic causes to guide them. Identifying trends of co-occurrence among hundreds of diseases in 120 million patients, they created a unique genetic map that has the potential to help diagnose, identify risk factors for and someday develop therapies against complex diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2013
New NIH-funded resource focuses on use of genomic variants in medical care
Three new grants from the National Institutes of Health totaling more than $25 million over four years will help three research groups to develop authoritative information on the millions of genomic variants relevant to human disease and the hundreds that are expected to be useful for clinical practice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 25-Sep-2013
Infection and Immunity
Researchers develop model to study human response to infections that cause peptic ulcers
Virginia Tech esearchers have developed a model that helps scientists and clinicians understand that complex interactions of a type of bacteria that is the leading cause of peptic ulcers. The discovery may inform changes in the ways doctors treat patients. An estimated 4 million Americans have peptic ulcers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tiffany Trent
ttrent@vt.edu
540-231-6822
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
UT Arlington engineers lead $1 million NSF project to develop personalized iRehab system
A UT Arlington multidisciplinary team will lead a three-year, $1 million National Science Foundation grant project to develop iRehab, a smart rehabilitation system that can adapt and personalize therapy programs based on a patient's needs and constraints.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Bacteria don't always work 'just in time'
In nature production processes are following the 'just-in-time-principle': Only what is really necessary will be provided. But according to a report of Bioinformaticians from Jena University (Germany) in the Science Magazine 'Nature Communications', bacteria like for instance Escherichia coli don't always work according to the 'just in time'-principle at all.

Contact: Ute Schoenfelder
presse@uni-jena.de
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Global analysis reveals new insights into the ribosome -- with important implications for disease
In a first-of-its-kind study that broadly examines the composition of the riboproteome, a scientific team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals previously unappreciated components of the ribosome, uncovering a large and dynamic structure that, among other things, can be altered in cancer.
National Institutes of Health, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Genetics in Medicine
Genetics in Medicine publishes special issue dedicated to genomics in electronic health records
Now, in the first collection of its kind, the October 2013 issue of Genetics in Medicine, the official peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, provides a series of research articles detailing challenges and solutions for integrating genomic data into EHR.

Contact: Kathy Ridgely Beal
kbeal@acmg.net
301-238-4582
American College of Medical Genetics

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
CSHL is part of iPlant group awarded $50 million to create US biology cyberinfrastructure
The National Science Foundation has awarded $50 million to investigators at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and other members of the multi-institution iPlant collaborative headquartered at the University of Arizona's BIO5 Institute to create a national cyberinfrastructure for the biological sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Cancer Cell
Research team uncovers root cause of multiple myeloma relapse
Working in collaboration with colleagues at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix were part of the team that conducted the study published in the Sept. 9 issue of Cancer Cell.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, MMRFoundation, Leukemla and Lymphoma Society and Canadian Cancer Society

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
$50 million NSF grant to advance cyberinfrastructure for big data in life sciences
Headquartered at the University of Arizona, the iPlant Collaborative is a $100 million NSF-funded project providing scalable cyberinfrastructure to help the nation's researchers make sense of massive data sets and train the next generation of data scientists.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
UdeM's IRIC and IRICoR achieve important milestone in their collaboration with Bristol-Myers Squibb
University of Montreal and the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer -- Commercialization of Research (IRICoR) today announced that researchers from UdeM's Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company have jointly identified a small molecule drug candidate against a novel target.

Contact: Gilles Noël, Ph.D.
gilles.noel@umontreal.ca
514-343-2307
University of Montreal

Showing releases 376-400 out of 716.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>