EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
30-Nov-2015 03:06
US Eastern Time




Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books



Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation


Submit a Calendar Item


Links & Resources


RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On


Portal Home


Background Articles

Research Papers


Links & Resources


News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 401-425 out of 838.

<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Early returns on 2014 show significant growth in use of GBIF
Preliminary statistics suggest that worldwide use of and interest in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility grew significantly during 2014. While thorough analysis will require more time, GBIF Secretariat's ongoing monitoring program of scientific research literature suggests a 35 percent increase during 2014 in the use and citation of biodiversity data accessed via GBIF's open-access infrastructure. More people -- 738,649 users from 236 countries -- have visited more often, too, logging more than 1.13 million sessions during 2014.

Contact: Kyle Copas
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Pitt study links biomarkers to long-term kidney damage and death in critically ill
High levels of two novel urinary biomarkers early in critical illness are associated with adverse long-term outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), according to an international, multi-center study led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Researchers. AKI is a condition that often affects those in intensive care and can occur hours to days after serious infections, surgery or taking certain medications.
Astute Medical, Inc.

Contact: Rick Pietzak
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Software created to help find a cure for a 'great neglected disease'
For decades, scientists around the world have worked to develop a treatment for schistosomiasis, a debilitating water-born parasite. To aid this research, scientists at San Francisco State University have developed software that helps assess the impact of a drug on the parasite. Singh and his team recently completed the Quantal Dose Response Calculator, software that analyzes images showing the effects of potential drugs on parasites and quantifies their effectiveness.

Contact: Beth Tagawa
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Applications in Plant Sciences
One pipeline that combines many gene-finding tools
MAKER2 is an annotation pipeline that combines multiple programs into a single bioinformatics tool that can produce genome annotations even with limited data. In a study in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, researchers develop a MAKER2 workflow using the phylogenetically challenging genus Penstemon to create a large-scale data set from limited genomic data. A sample protocol, sequence libraries, functional annotation files, and other resources are also provided.

Contact: Beth Parada
Botanical Society of America

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Leopoldina publishes recommendations on handling changes in the life sciences
Modern high-throughput screening methods for analyzing genetic information, proteins and metabolic products offer new ways of obtaining large quantities of data on life processes. These OMICS technologies are fueling hopes of major advances in, e.g., medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, food sciences. The report 'Life sciences in transition' by Germany's National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina sets out recommendations on how existing deficiencies can be overcome and research better equipped for the challenges.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Eight graduate students and postdocs receive GSA's DeLill Nasser Award
The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is proud to name eight early-career scientists -- four graduate students and four postdoctoral researchers -- as spring 2015 recipients of GSA's DeLill Nasser Award for Professional Development in Genetics. The award provides a $1,000 travel grant for each recipient to attend any national or international meeting, conference, or laboratory course that will enhance his or her career.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
The 'Berlin patient,' first and only person cured of HIV, speaks out
Timothy Ray Brown, long known only as the 'Berlin Patient' had HIV for 12 years before he became the first person in the world to be cured of the infection following a stem cell transplant in 2007. He recalls his many years of illness, a series of difficult decisions, and his long road to recovery in the first-person account, 'I Am the Berlin Patient: A Personal Reflection,' published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
When DNA gets sent to time-out
For a skin cell to do its job, it must turn on a completely different set of genes than a liver cell -- and keep genes it doesn't need switched off. One way of turning off large groups of genes at once is to send them to 'time-out' at the edge of the nucleus. New research shows how DNA gets sent to the nucleus' far edge, a process critical to controlling genes and determining cell fate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Catherine Kolf
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
UMMS to develop a model for predicting gene expression in dendritic cells
Deciphering the language of gene expression, UMMS scientists Jeremy Luban, M.D., and Manuel Garber, Ph.D., received $6.1 million from the NIH to develop a model system for exploring gene regulation using human dendritic cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Fessenden
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind
An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation for Autism Research, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
Molecular Cell
Penn scientists identify patterns of RNA regulation in the nuclei of plants
In a new study done in plants, University of Pennsylvania biologists give a global view of the patterns that can affect the various RNA regulatory processes that occur before these molecules move into the cytoplasm, where they are translated into the proteins that make up a living organism.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Molecular Systems Biology
Molecular network identified underlying autism spectrum disorders
Researchers in the United States have identified a molecular network that comprises many of the genes previously shown to contribute to autism spectrum disorders. The findings provide a map of some of the crucial protein interactions that contribute to autism and will help uncover novel candidate genes for the disease.

Contact: Barry Whyte

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Funding ended for University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center
Funding has not been renewed for the five-year-old University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center (UC-HiPACC). UC-HiPACC fostered collaborations of astrophysicists across the UC system and three DOE labs, including attracting students and funding. 'Its loss is devastating,' says director Joel Primack. Alternative funding is now being sought. A No-Cost Extension to the grant through March 31, 2015, will support limited operations: the pioneering AGORA research effort, preparation of a five-year report, and crafting of proposals.

Contact: Joel R. Primack
University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Penn and UGA awarded $23.4 million contract for pathogen genomics database
A five-year, $23.4 million contract from the National Institutes of Health will support a growing database of genomic information about disease-causing microbes, co-directed by the University of Pennsylvania's David Roos.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
RNA measurements may yield less insight about gene expression than assumed
The majority of RNA expression differences between individuals have no connection to the abundance of a corresponding protein, report scientists from the University of Chicago and Stanford University in Science on Dec. 18. The findings point to a yet-unidentified cellular mechanism that regulates gene expression and suggest studies that rely only on RNA measurements to characterize gene function require further analysis.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kevin Jiang
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
'Hairclip' protein mechanism explained
A new study describes, for the first time, a fundamental mechanism regulating a protein's shape. The 'Hairclip' mechanism involves mutations acting on one side of a protein to open or close the configuration of amino acids on the other. The findings have implications for the manipulation of proteins, with potential applications in biotechnology and drug development.
Nakajima Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Bergen Forskningsstiftelse, UK Medical Research Council

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Better focus at the micro world: A low-budget focus stacking system for mass digitization
A team of Belgian researchers constructed a focus stacking set-up made of consumer grade products with better end results than high-end solutions and this at only a tenth of the prize of current existing systems. Because of the operational ease, speed and the low cost of the system, it is ideal for mass digitization programs involving type specimens. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Jonathan Brecko
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
UTSA engineers receive $1.08 million NIH grant to advance breast cancer research
The National Institutes of Health recently awarded a $1.08 million grant to the University of Texas at San Antonio to combine computational modeling with biological information to advance our understanding of what may cause breast cells to become cancerous.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: KC Gonzalez
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
First steps for Hector the robot stick insect
A research team at Bielefeld University has succeeded in teaching the only robot of its kind in the world how to walk. Its first steps have been recorded in a video. You can watch them in Bielefeld University's latest posting on 'research_tv'. The robot is called Hector, and its construction is modeled on a stick insect.

Contact: Dr. Axel Schneider
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
'Microlesions' in epilepsy discovered by novel technique
Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients. The millimeter-sized abnormalities may explain why areas of the brain that appear normal can produce severe seizures in many children and adults with epilepsy.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Sharon Parmet
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Smithsonian launches major new initiative to better understand life on Earth
Scientists across the Smithsonian have studied genomics for years, investigating how animal and plant species function, relate to one another, adapt to change and thrive or fail to survive. Genomics also play a key role in their research of climate change, disease and biodiversity conservation. The Smithsonian is now uniting these efforts and creating a plan for transformative future research with the establishment of the Smithsonian Institute for Biodiversity Genomics.

Contact: John Gibbons

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
New TGen test uses the unique genetics of women to uncover neurologic disorders
TGen's discovery relies on a simple genetic fact: Men have one X and one Y chromosome, while women have two X chromosomes. This women-only factor was leveraged by TGen investigators to develop a highly accurate method of tracking down a previously unrecognized disorder of the X-chromosome. The study of a pre-teen girl, who went years with an undiagnosed neurobehavioral condition, was published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.
State of Arizona, Stardust Foundation, TGen Foundation

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
New discoveries in age-related macular degeneration revealed in industry and academia
Insilico Medicine along with scientists from Vision Genomics and Howard University shed light on AMD disease, introducing the opportunity for eventual diagnostic and treatment options.

Contact: Michael Petr
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
3-D maps reveal the genome's origami code
In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation -- a kind of 'genomic origami' that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells. The research appears online today in Cell.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NVIDIA, IBM, Google, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, McNair Medical Institute

Contact: Jade Boyd
Rice University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
WPI team develops tool to better classify tumor cells for personalized cancer treatments
A new statistical model developed by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute may enable physicians to create personalized cancer treatments for patients based on the specific genetic mutations found in their tumors. The model uses an advanced algorithm to identify the multiple genetic cell subtypes typically found in solid tumors by analyzing gene expression data from a small biopsy sample. The results can help shape more effective treatments and also guide future research.

Contact: Michael Cohen
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Showing releases 401-425 out of 838.

<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>