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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 726-729 out of 729.

<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30

Public Release: 28-Nov-2012
Big genomics data, big scientific impact: New challenges for further development of life science
BGI, the world's largest genomics organization, today announced its latest advances in the analysis, management and dissemination of "Big Genomics Data" at their 3rd bioinformatics software and data release conference.

Contact: Jia Liu
liujia@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 28-Nov-2012
Nature
Tiny algae shed light on photosynthesis as a dynamic property
Many of the world's most important photosynthetic eukaryotes such as plants got their light-harnessing organelles (chloroplasts) indirectly from other organisms through endosymbiosis. In some instances, this resulted in algae with multiple, distinct genomes, some in residual organelles (nucleomorphs). To better understand why nucleomorphs persist after endosymbiosis, an international team including researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute collaborated to sequence and analyze two tiny algae. Their report appeared online Nov. 29, 2012 in Nature.

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 27-Nov-2012
Human Molecular Genetics
Researchers find chemical 'switches' for neurodegenerative diseases
By using a model, researchers at the University of Montreal have identified and "switched off" a chemical chain that causes neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and dementia. The findings could one day be of particular therapeutic benefit to Huntington's disease patients.

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 25-Nov-2012
Nature Genetics
Chinese scientists decode watermelon genome, possible future benefits for crop improvement
An international team led by Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, BGI, and other institutes has completed the genomic sequence of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and the resequencing of 20 watermelon accessions. The genomic data presented in this study will shape future efforts on watermelon genetics and evolutionary research, and also provide an invaluable resource for other plants research and crop genetic improvement.

Contact: Jia Liu
liujia@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Showing releases 726-729 out of 729.

<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30