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Showing releases 76-100 out of 743.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acid Therapeutics
New guidelines for reproductive & developmental toxicity testing of oligonucleotide drugs
Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics present unique challenges when it comes to testing their potential to cause reproductive and developmental harm. New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing that take into consideration the combined chemical and biological characteristics of these novel biopharmaceuticals are presented in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New research show that bats will hang out with their friends this Halloween
New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of 'friends.' The study, published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, found that different social groups roost in separate, though adjacent, parts of woodland. The findings have important implications for conservation. The research was carried out by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, the University of Exeter and the University of Oxford.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Barnaby Smith
bpgs@ceh.ac.uk
44-079-202-95384
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Brain responses to disgusting images help reveal political leanings
An team of scientists led by Virginia Tech reports that the strength of a person's reaction to repulsive images can forecast their political ideology. The brain's response to a single disgusting image was enough to predict an individual's political ideology.

Contact: Paula Brewer Byron
540-526-2027
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact
A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Biodiversity Data Journal
Go straight and publish: From Barcode of Life Data Systems to scholarly publishing systems
An innovative workflow reveals new research potential of the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD). A recently published article in the Biodiversity Data Journal demonstrates how specimen data downloaded from BOLD in tabular format can be imported directly into the manuscript to study species distributions.

Contact: Fernandez-Triana
jftriana@uoguelph.ca
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
BGI Tech and Hebei Agricultural University complete the genome sequencing of the jujube tree
BGI Tech and Hebei Agricultural University jointly announced the complete, high quality sequencing of the jujube genome. Jujube is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family, and the jujube genome is particularly difficult to sequence due the high level of heterozygosity and other complicating factors. It is the first time that a genome in the Rhamnaceae, Buckthorn, family has been sequenced. This study has been recently published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Kidney cancer in Central Europe
Large-scale DNA and RNA sequencing of renal cell carcinoma patients in Europe reveals primary causes of kidney cancer vary between populations. Findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma. Association between cancer incidence and exposure to aristolochic acid -- an ingredient in some herbal remedies -- has implications for public health, particularly in Romania.
European Commission Framework Programme 7 (FP7), Genome Quebec, McGill University, Cancer Research UK Centre, ECMC

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
pressoffice@embl.de
49-622-138-78263
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Comprehensive solutions for genome analysis and synthetic biology projects
Eurofins Genomics and Igenbio provide tailored services for sequencing and analysis of various organisms.

Contact: Carola Grimminger
carolagrimminger@eurofins.com
49-809-282-89921
Eurofins Genomics

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Three-company collaboration announced for advancement of aging research
Insilico Medicine, Inc., Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Ltd. and Plantbiosis, Ltd. announce their three way partnership to fuel aging research with the combination of personalized medicine, drug discovery, and next generation sequencing.

Contact: Michael Petr
michael.petr@insilicomedicine.com
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Science Signaling
Modeling cancer: Virginia Tech researchers prove models can predict cellular processes
Researchers developed mathematical models to predict the dynamics of cell transitions, and compared their results with actual measurements of activity in cell populations. The results could inform efforts to treat cancer patients.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Molecular geneticist awarded McClintock Prize
Susan R. Wessler, a distinguished professor of genetics at the University of California, Riverside and a world-renowned expert in transposable elements, has been awarded the McClintock Prize for Plant Genetics and Genome Studies for her exceptional contributions to and leadership in the study of plant transposable elements for the last three decades. Transposable elements are DNA pieces that can move from one genomic location to another and duplicate themselves in the process.
Maize Genetics Executive Committee

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New study uses DNA sequences to look back in time at key events in plant evolution
Scientists from North America, Europe and China have published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that reveals important details about key transitions in the evolution of plant life on our planet. From strange and exotic algae, mosses, ferns, trees and flowers growing deep in steamy rainforests to the grains and vegetables we eat and the ornamental plants adorning our homes, all plant life on Earth shares over a billion years of history.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
InSilico Medicine announces collaboration -- Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories
Insilico Medicine will fund CCARL's pilot research study in personalized medicine and aging research.

Contact: Michael Petr
michael.petr@insilicomedicine.com
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Ecological Informatics
Beyond LOL cats, social networks could become trove of biodiversity data
Vijay Barve demonstrated social networks to be a viable source for photo-vouchered biodiversity records, especially those that clarify which species exist in what places within developing nations.

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Cell
Reading a biological clock in the dark
Proper coordination between our gut bacteria and our biological clocks may be crucial for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Partnership with national laboratory brings latest diagnostic tests to university
A Kansas State University veterinary medicine team is partnering with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to bring the latest diagnostic tools to the university and provide opportunities for students.
Kansas National Bio and Agro-defense Facility Transition Fund

Contact: Raymond "Bob" Rowland
rrowland@k-state.edu
785-532-4631
Kansas State University

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Nature Genetics
High-speed evolution in the lab
Organisms require flexible genomes in order to adapt to changes in the environment. Scientists from the Vetmeduni Vienna study genomes of entire populations. They want to know why individuals differ from each other and how these differences are encoded in the DNA. In two review papers published in the journals Nature Reviews Genetics and Heredity, they discuss why DNA sequencing of entire groups can be an efficient and cost-effective way to answer these questions.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began
Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants -- and first acted as energy parasites in cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new University of Virginia study.

Contact: Fariss Samarrai
fls4f@virginia.edu
434-924-3778
University of Virginia

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NYU Langone Medical Center to lead multi-institutional MRSA research funded by the NIH
NYU Langone Medical Center will lead National Institutes of Health funded research to discover the functional immunology and microbial genetics of staphylococcus aureus, one of the most common pathogens leading to life-threatening blood-borne infections.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
How the fruit fly could help us sniff out drugs and bombs
A fly's sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new University of Sussex research has found.
CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jacqui Bealing
press@sussex.ac.uk
44-127-367-8888
University of Sussex

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New discovery will enhance yield and quality of cereal and bioenergy crops
A team of scientists led by Thomas Brutnell, Ph.D., have developed a new way of identifying genes that are important for photosynthesis in maize, and in rice.

Contact: Melanie Bernds
mbernds@danforthcenter.org
314-587-1647
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Taxonomy -- the Leopoldina publishes recommendations on researching biodiversity
With a view to making optimal use of the new opportunities available to taxonomy, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina recommends, in its statement entitled 'Challenges and Opportunities of Integrative Taxonomy for Research and Society,' promoting efforts to describe all the species of Central Europe. The statement also calls for investments in taxonomic research and teaching.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-345-472-39800
Leopoldina

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Researchers to receive $4.4 million from NIH to harness biomedical data 'goldmines'
San Diego researchers at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Translational Science Institute will receive more than $4.4 million as part of a National Institutes of Health initiative called 'Big Data to Knowledge.'
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Showing releases 76-100 out of 743.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>