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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1090.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 27-Aug-2015
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Survey finds many physicians overestimate their ability to assess patients' risk of Ebola
While most primary care physicians responding to a survey expressed confidence in their ability to identify potential cases of Ebola and communicate Ebola risks to their patients, when asked how they would care for hypothetical patients who might have been exposed to Ebola, less than 70 percent gave answers fitting CDC guidelines. Those least likely to encounter an Ebola patient were most likely to choose overly intense management of patients actually at low risk.

Contact: Mike Morrison
mdmorrison@partners.org
617-724-6425
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 27-Aug-2015
PLOS Pathogens
A patient shedding poliovirus for 28 years -- possible challenges for polio eradication
With all but two countries worldwide, Pakistan and Afghanistan, declared polio-free, the eradication of the devastating viral disease in the near future is a real possibility. A study published on Aug. 27 in PLOS Pathogens reports results from an individual in the UK with an immune disease whose stool samples have contained large amounts of live polio virus for over 20 years. Patients like this one, the authors suggest, could start new polio outbreaks and complicate polio eradication as currently planned.

Contact: Javier Martin
javier.martin@nibsc.org
44-170-764-1295
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
The Lancet
Life expectancy climbs globally but more time spent living with illness and disability
People around the world are living longer, even in some of the poorest countries, but a complex mix of fatal and nonfatal ailments causes a tremendous amount of health loss, according to a new analysis of all major diseases and injuries in 188 countries. Global life expectancy at birth for both sexes rose by 6.2 years, while healthy life expectancy, or HALE, at birth rose by 5.4 years.

Contact: Rhonda Stewart
stewartr@uw.edu
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
PLOS Medicine
Less may be more in slowing cholera epidemics
An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
BMJ Quality Improvement Reports
Project in West Africa sees dramatic drop in TB death rates
Doctors in Togo, West Africa have seen a 10 percent drop in tuberculosis death rates after redesigning diagnosis and treatment services in one of the country's health districts.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
gozde.zorlu@gmail.com
44-207-383-6920
BMJ

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
PLOS Medicine
One dose or 2? Cholera vaccination strategies
A new modeling study appearing this week in PLOS Medicine supports consideration of vaccination campaigns using a single dose of cholera vaccine versus campaigns using the recommended two doses given two weeks apart. Justin Lessler and colleagues focus their modelling analyses on comparing the number of lives that could be saved by adopting a single vaccine dose, which could be more rapidly administered to more people than the internationally licensed two dose protocol.

Contact: Press Office
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases
Is MERS another SARS: The facts behind Middle East Respiratory Syndrome
Experts show that while Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, a viral respiratory illness, is infecting less people, it has a higher mortality rate and affects a specific target population when compared to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. This research is being presented at the International Conference on Emerging and Infectious Diseases in Atlanta, Georgia.

Contact: Aleea Khan
akhan@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tiny antibodies point to vulnerability in disease-causing parasites
By teasing apart the structure of an enzyme vital to the parasites that cause toxoplasmosis and malaria, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a potentially 'druggable' target that could prevent parasites from entering and exiting host cells.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, German Academic Exchange Service

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Global Health: Science and Practice
New diagnostic tools for dehydration severity in children
Dehydration from diarrhea, either viral or from cholera, kills 700,000 children a year worldwide, yet clinicians still lack a method that performs significantly better than chance for diagnosing dehydration severity. In a new study, researchers report two sensitive and specific diagnostic tools derived from the cases of hundreds of young children in Bangladesh.
NIH Fogarty International Center

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2015
2015 World Congress on Health and Biomedical Informatics
There is lots of health data out there, how can it be used it to improve health care?
Regenstrief Institute investigators experienced in the use of data to improve health care and its delivery in resource constrained environments will introduce attendees at MedInfo 2015 to open source options for health information exchange and data analysis.

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@Iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 19-Aug-2015
ACC, Apollo Hospitals partner to expand medical education offerings in India
The American College of Cardiology is collaborating with Apollo Hospitals in India to provide the College's guideline-driven educational content to physicians participating in Apollo's Medvarsity e-learning program, India's first medical e-learning venture.

Contact: Katie Glenn
kglenn@acc.org
202-375-6472
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
AIDS
Agricultural intervention improves HIV outcomes
A multifaceted farming intervention can reduce food insecurity while improving HIV outcomes in patients in Kenya, according to a randomized, controlled trial led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UC Global Health Institute Center of Expertise in Women's Health & Empowerment

Contact: Jeff Sheehy
Jeff.Sheehy@ucsf.edu
415-845-1132
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
eLife
'Molecular tweezer' targets HIV and prevents semen from promoting infection
Semen can enhance HIV infectivity by up to 10,000 times so targeting the proteins responsible as well as the infection itself provides an 'unprecedented' dual protection. The specificity of the compound described also means it could have less side effects.

Contact: Zoe Dunford
z.dunford@elifesciences.org
44-077-863-03597
eLife

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
American Chemical Society 250th National Meeting & Exposition
Paper-based test can quickly diagnose Ebola in remote areas (video)
When a fever strikes in a developing area, the immediate concern may be: Is it the common flu or something much worse? To facilitate diagnosis in remote, low-resource settings, researchers have developed a paper-based device that changes color, depending on whether the patient has Ebola, yellow fever or dengue. It takes minutes and does not need electricity. The team will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
$7 million grant aids efforts to eliminate neglected tropical diseases
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a $7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at eliminating river blindness and elephantiasis, two neglected tropical diseases that annually sicken millions.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Judy Martin Finch
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell
NIH-funded study establishes genomic data set on Lassa virus
An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). The genomic catalog contains nearly 200 viral genomes collected from patient and field samples from the major host of Lassa virus -- the multimammate rat. The study suggests that these four LASV strains originated from a common ancestral virus more than 1,000 years ago and spread across West Africa within the last several hundred years.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell
International team discovers the ancient origins of deadly Lassa virus
Working as part of an international team in the United States and West Africa, a researcher at The Scripps Research Institute has published new findings showing the ancient roots of the deadly Lassa virus, a relative of Ebola virus, and how Lassa virus has changed over time.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Department of Health and Human Services, Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering, Broad Institute SPARC Award, German Research Foundation, Carls

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell
How the malaria parasite increases the risk of blood cancer
A link between malaria and Burkitt's lymphoma was first described more than 50 years ago, but how a parasitic infection could turn immune cells cancerous has remained a mystery. Now, in the Aug. 13 issue of Cell, researchers demonstrate in mice that B cell DNA becomes vulnerable to cancer-causing mutations during prolonged combat against the malaria-causing Plasmodium falciparum.
National Institutes of Health, Worldwide Cancer Research, Fondazione Ettore e Valeria Rossi

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Journal of Women's Health
Diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50 percent of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Best interest of the child: Improving health, well-being of low resource country orphans
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University, Brown University, University of Toronto, and Moi University in Eldoret, Kenya are building upon their landmark study of Kenyan orphans which found that those living in orphanages were healthier, both physically and mentally, than those living with extended family members. The new study investigates the causes of this disparity.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
ACS Central Science
Powering off TB: New electron transport gene is a potential drug target
The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first new drug to fight tuberculosis in more than 40 years, but treatment still takes six months, 200 pills and leaves 40 percent of patients uncured. Thus, new targets are needed. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers report they have identified one such target -- a gene that allows the disease to camp out in human immune cells, and is thus essential for the organism's proliferation.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Keystone Symposia announces new three-year, multi-million-dollar grant
Keystone Symposia has received a new three-year, $2.25 million grant from the Gates Foundation to fund LMIC meetings in its Global Health Series plus Travel Awards for LMIC investigators.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Yvonne Psaila
yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org
970-262-2676
Keystone Symposia on Molecular & Cellular Biology

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Virology
Research advances potential for test and vaccine for genital and oral herpes
Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. The work may also lead to the development of a vaccine that protects against the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Back-to-school vaccines not just for students
Back-to-school is an annual reminder to make sure children are fully vaccinated. But vaccination is a life-long health concern and the AOA urges adults to use the seasonal cue to ensure their own immunizations are up to date. The AOA resolved at its annual business meeting that DOs should treat patients' vaccination history as an integral part of their health record and urges DOs to take all reasonable steps to ensure patients are fully immunized.

Contact: Lauren Brush
lbrush@osteopathic.org
312-202-8161
American Osteopathic Association

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists identify a mechanism of epidemic bacterial disease
Through identification of increased toxin production by epidemic forms of group A streptococcus (the 'flesh-eating' bacterium), for the first time scientists are able to pinpoint the molecular events that contribute to large intercontinental epidemics of disease. The study was based on sequencing almost 5,000 group A streptococcus genomes collected over decades.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gale Smith
gsmith@houstonmethodist.org
281-627-0439
Houston Methodist

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1090.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>