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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 889.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Developing countries should enroll medical and nursing students from rural areas
The severity of health workforce shortages in developing countries is a major barrier to global health advances. From 2011 to 2012, Silvestri and collaborators surveyed first- and final-year medical and nursing students at 16 leading government-run medical and nursing schools in eight countries. The study, published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization today, provides new evidence supporting WHO recommendations on recruiting and retaining health workers in rural areas.
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Medical Scholars Program

Contact: Fiona Fleck
fleckf@who.int
41-227-911-897
Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
International Joint Conference on Biometrics
Scanning babies' fingerprints could save lives
Each year 2.5 million children die worldwide because they do not receive life-saving vaccinations at the appropriate time. Anil Jain, Michigan State University professor, is developing a fingerprint-based recognition method to track vaccination schedules for infants and toddlers, which will increase immunization coverage and save lives.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Kim Ward
kim.ward@cabs.msu.edu
Michigan State University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Tropical disease prevalence in Latin America presents opportunity for US
Recently published prevalence estimates of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in five Latin American countries -- Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Venezuela -- could suggest a new direction for United States foreign policy in the region, according to a tropical-disease expert at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Lancet Global Health
Experts at LSTM use modelling approach to assess the effectiveness TB diagnostics
Experts at LSTM have used a novel modelling approach to project the effects of new diagnostic methods and algorithms for the diagnosis of tuberculosis recently endorsed by the World Health Organization, looking at the patient, health system and population perspective in Tanzania.

Contact: Clare Bebb
clare.bebb@lstmed.ac.uk
44-015-170-53135
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation joins consortium of partners for USAID-funded research
The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation today announced that it will join the Population Council and a prestigious consortium of leading HIV research organizations as part of a five-year project funded by the US Agency for International Development. The Supporting Operational AIDS Research project aims to conduct operational HIV and AIDS research, promote utilization and dissemination of data, and build the capacity of local organizations to conduct operational research
US Agency for International Development

Contact: Johanna Harvey
jharvey@pedaids.org
202-280-1657
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Science
Agonizing rabies deaths can be stopped worldwide
In the current issue of Science magazine, an international team of researchers led by the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University report that ridding the world of rabies in humans is cost-effective and achievable through mass dog vaccination programs.
Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Lincoln Park Zoological Society, MSD Animal Health, Tusk Trust

Contact: Guy Palmer, Ph.D
gpalmer@wsu.edu
509-432-3385
Washington State University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Project aims to turn mobile phones into detectors of disease-spreading insects
The Virtual Vector Project already has built an ingenious prototype to recognize species of triatomine bugs that spread Chagas disease, endemic in much of rural Mexico, Central America and South America.
University of Kansas Office of the Provost

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Royal Society Open Science
Enzyme discovery paves way to tackling deadly parasite diseases
An enzyme found in all living things could hold the key to combating deadly diseases such as sleeping sickness, a study suggests.
Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Scottish University Life Sciences Alliance and Biotechnology, Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Celgene Global Health and DNDi expand collaboration
Celgene Global Health, a division of Celgene Corporation, and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) strengthen their collaboration with a four-year Research Collaboration Agreement to identify and optimize new drug candidates for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Celgene will provide DNDi with new data and resources to accelerate clinical development of new treatments for patients with NTDs.

Contact: Violaine Dällenbach
vdallenbach@dndi.org
41-794-241-474
Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
BMJ Open
Eating five a day may keep the blues away
Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health, new research suggests.

Contact: Kelly Parkes-Harrison
k.e.parkes@warwick.ac.uk
0247-615-0868
University of Warwick

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
PLOS Medicine
Mefloquine fails to replace SP for malaria prevention during pregnancy
In this issue of PLOS Medicine, Clara Menendez from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Spain, and colleagues report results from two large randomized controlled trials conducted in Africa to test an alternative drug for malaria prevention in HIV-negative and HIV-positive pregnant women.
European Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partners, Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Institut de Recherche pour le De´veloppement

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers develop new DNA sequencing method to diagnose tuberculosis
Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum -- a technique called metagenomics -- to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consuming culture of bacteria in the laboratory.

Contact: Kelly Parkes-Harrison
K.E.Parkes-Harrison@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-761-50868
PeerJ

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Canada funds 22 innovative projects to help save 'Every Woman, Every Child'
Grand Challenges Canada announces 22 grants to innovators in Canada and the developing world to address maternal, newborn and child health. MNCH, a centerpiece of Canada's international assistance efforts, will be the focus of events and talks throughout this month's UN General Assembly in New York.
Grand Challenges Canada

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
Terry Collins Assoc

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
Research predicts possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month
Arizona State University and Harvard University researchers also discovered through modelling analysis that the rate of rise in cases significantly increased in August in Liberia and Guinea, around the time that a mass quarantine was put in place, indicating that the mass quarantine efforts may have made the outbreak worse than it would have been otherwise.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Research milestone in CCHF virus could help identify new treatments
New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus which causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused by Ebolavirus, has identified new cellular factors essential for CCHFV infection. This discovery has the potential to lead to novel targets for therapeutic interventions against the pathogen.
Ewing Halsell Foundation, Douglass Foundation, US Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Lisa Cruz
lcruz@txbiomed.org
210-258-9437
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Immunity
New insights on an ancient plague could improve treatments for infections
Dangerous new pathogens such as the Ebola virus invoke scary scenarios of deadly epidemics, but even ancient scourges such as the bubonic plague are still providing researchers with new insights on how the body responds to infections. In a study published online Sept. 18, 2014, in the journal Immunity, researchers at Duke Medicine and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore detail how the bacteria that cause bubonic plague hitchhike on immune cells in the lymph nodes and ride into the lungs and the blood stream
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A new way to prevent the spread of devastating diseases
Researchers around the country are adopting a technique developed in the Caltech lab of Nobel Laureate David Baltimore to try to guard against infection. The method, called VIP, was originally designed to trigger an immune response to HIV, and because of its success with HIV is now being studied, in mice, for protection against influenza, malaria, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis.

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Annals of Oncology
Experts issue plea for better research and education for advanced breast cancer
Breast cancer experts around the world have issued a plea to researchers, academics, drug companies, funders and advocates to carry out high quality research and clinical trials for advanced breast cancer, a disease which is almost always fatal and for which there are many unanswered questions. The plea is published in the latest international consensus guidelines for the management of advanced breast cancer, published simultaneously in the leading cancer journals The Breast and Annals of Oncology.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
World population to keep growing this century, hit 11 billion by 2100
The chance that world population in 2100 will be between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion people is 80 percent, according to the first such United Nations forecast to incorporate modern statistical tools.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
eLife
Ebola outbreak 'out of all proportion' and severity cannot be predicted
A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr. Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-767-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pairing social networks with social motives to close the science gap
Noshir Contractor is leading a survey of 14,000 health workers in India to discover how to best disseminate public health information.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
PLOS Medicine
World Health Organization policy improves use of medicines
In this issue of PLOS Medicine, Kathleen Holloway from the World Health Organization and David Henry evaluated data on reported adherence to World Health Organization essential medicines practices and measures of quality use of medicines from 56 low and middle income countries for 2002-2008. They compared the countries' government-reported implementation of 36 essential medicines policies with independent survey results for 10 validated indicators of quality use of medicines.
World Health Organization, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre at Boston and Harvard Universities

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Protein secrets of Ebola virus
The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which has claimed more than 2000 lives, has highlighted the need for a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of the virus that could be critical in the development of vaccines or antiviral drugs to treat or prevent Ebola hemorrhagic fever.
DOD/Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: ja@iucr.org
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Japanese Global Health Fund awards $33.5 million to develop vaccines, drugs for neglected diseases
The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund), a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced seven grant investments totaling US$15.3 million to speed the development of promising drugs and vaccines to battle three insect-borne diseases -- malaria, dengue and Chagas disease. The announcement marks the GHIT Fund's third round of grant investments since November 2013 -- totaling $33.5 million.
Global Health Innovative Technology Fund

Contact: Katy Lenard
klenard@burnesscommunications.com
301-280-5719
Burness Communications

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Advancing the science for health programming in crisis conditions
Humanitarian crises are becoming increasingly complex and a growing threat to the health and safety of populations. An improved evidence-base to guide interventions in the countries most vulnerable to these conditions is more critical than ever. A paper by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health looks at the challenges of doing research in such settings and the strategies that must be adopted for scientific advance.

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Showing releases 1-25 out of 889.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>