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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1088.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Scientific Reports
New approach for making vaccines for deadly diseases
Researchers have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines -- creating immunity without vaccination. They demonstrated that animals injected with synthetic DNA engineered to encode a specific neutralizing antibody against the dengue virus were capable of producing the exact antibodies necessary to protect against disease, without the need for standard antigen-based vaccination. This approach, was rapid, protecting animals within a week of administration.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and Inovio Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
Stress responder is a first responder in helping repair DNA damage and avoiding cancer
DNA damage increases the risk of cancer, and researchers have found that a protein, known to rally when cells get stressed, plays a critical, early step in its repair.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Pitt researchers to monitor resistance to HIV drugs in Africa
Infectious diseases researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are leading a five-year, $5 million initiative to monitor drug resistance during the rollout of HIV prevention drugs in sub-Saharan Africa.
US Agency for International Development, US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Epigenetics
WSU researchers investigate effect of environmental epigenetics on disease and evolution
Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism's DNA sequence. Their assertion is a dramatic shift in how we might think of disease and evolution's underlying biology and 'changes how we think about where things come from,' said WSU biologist Michael Skinner.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Skinner
skinner@wsu.edu
509-335-1524
Washington State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
BMC Public Health
Tool helps public health agencies prioritize health risks
Public health agencies across the globe are challenged with preventing the spread of chronic diseases while dealing with limited funds and devastating budget cuts. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has applied the Public Health Index model, a tool he designed that has been adopted by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, to help the Brazilian government identify and prioritize health risks affecting its population.

Contact: Diamond Dixon
dixondi@health.missouri.edu
573-884-7541
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Brown University to help Ghana build HIV, TB research capacity
With $1.45 million over five years from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, a pair of Brown University professors will work with colleagues in Ghana to build the research capacity needed to address the deadly co-epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis.
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
Safeguarding the greater good
Research teams from the Wyss Institute and University of California, San Diego -- the only two groups to have published work on RNA-guided CRISPR gene drives -- have proactively assembled an international group of 26 experts, including prominent genetic engineers and fruit fly geneticists, to unanimously recommend a series of preemptive measures to safeguard gene drive research.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Powerful patents: Navy outranks all government agencies in yearly report
Predicting the risk of pirate attacks on vital shipping lanes could soon be easier, thanks to a data system that's just one of 364 technologies patented by the US Navy in 2014.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Proof-of-concept study shows successful transport of blood samples with small drones
In a proof-of-concept study at Johns Hopkins, researchers have shown that results of common and routine blood tests are not affected by up to 40 minutes of travel via hobby-sized drones. The investigators say that's promising news for the millions of people cared for in rural and economically impoverished areas that lack passable roads in developing nations, because drones can give health care workers quick access to lab tests needed for diagnoses and treatments.

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Monitoring wildlife may shed light on spread of antibiotic resistance in humans
Researchers tested for resistance to 10 antibiotics among cattle and 18 wildlife species to explore key attributes and behaviors that may increase exposure and allow resistance to move among humans, animals, and ecosystems.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
3-D image of malaria 'conductor' aids search for antimalarial drugs
The first three-dimensional image capturing a critical malaria 'conductor' protein could lead to the development of a new class of antimalarial drugs. Researchers from Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute developed WEHI-842, a drug that blocks the malaria parasite protein plasmepsin V, killing the parasite. The discovery is a new step towards developing much needed new drugs for treating and preventing malaria.
National Health and Medical Research Council, Australian Cancer Research Foundation, Victorian Government Operational Infrastructure Support Program

Contact: Liz Williams
williams@wehi.edu.au
61-428-034-089
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Improved survival of HIV patients facilitates heart disease research
The improved survival rate of HIV patients in sub-Saharan Africa due to effective treatment programs is increasing the ability of researchers in Africa to study the impacts of cardiovascular disease in HIV patients, according to a guest editor page published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Contact: Katie Glenn
kglenn@acc.org
202-375-6472
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Malaria's key to the liver uncovered
Scientists uncover a port of liver entry for malaria parasites, and if these results hold up in humans, drugs that target this entry protein might help prevent the spread of disease.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
PLOS Biology
Some vaccines support evolution of more-virulent viruses
Scientific experiments with the herpesvirus such as the one that causes Marek's disease in poultry have confirmed, for the first time, the highly controversial theory that some vaccines could allow more-virulent versions of a virus to survive, putting unvaccinated individuals at greater risk of severe illness. The research has important implications for food-chain security and food-chain economics, as well as for other diseases that affect humans and agricultural animals.
NIH/National Institutes of Health Institute of General Medical Sciences, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, NSF-NIH-USDA/Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Program

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 26-Jul-2015
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Diabetes-TB link found in Australia
A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia.

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-409-734-542
James Cook University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Journal of Women's Health
Can patient navigators reduce no-shows for cancer screening follow-up?
Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital reported a 20 percent decline in the rate of missed appointments for cervical cancer evaluation following a Pap smear when a patient navigator program was initiated at the referral center. The impact of the program and the main reasons for patient no-shows are explored in an article in Journal of Women's Health.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Genome Research
Fighting mosquito resistance to insecticides
Controlling mosquitoes that carry human diseases is a global health challenge as their ability to resist insecticides now threatens efforts to prevent epidemics. Scientists from the CNRS, IRD, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in French Guiana have identified new genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides, which could improve its detection in the field. This work was published in Genome Research on July 23, 2015.
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, French Institut de Microbiologie et MaladiesInfectieuses, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine of Grenoble

Contact: Peggy Calicchia
calicchi@cshl.edu
516-422-4012
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Journal of Immunology
New smart drug targets and reduces site-specific inflammation
The uniqueness of this novel anti-inflammatory molecule, reported in the current issue of Journal of Immunology, can be found in a singular property. When injected, it is as a non-active drug. However, a localized site with excessive inflammation will activate it. Most other anti-inflammatory agents effectively inhibit inflammatory processes, though in a non-specific manner and in areas that include sites of necessary normal inflammatory homeostasis.
Kamin program of Israel's Ministry of Economy's Chief Scientist's Office

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-353-2505
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
University of Southampton to map impact of infectious diseases against research spending
Scientists at the University of Southampton are set to analyze research investments into infectious disease research, particularly pneumonia and maternal and neonatal infections, after receiving over £370,000 in funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Antiviral compound protects nonhuman primates against Marburg virus
An experimental drug that protected monkeys from the deadly Marburg virus appears to have potential for treating people who have been exposed to the virus, according to a study published in the July 23 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine. Marburg virus is closely related to Ebola virus and also causes a severe hemorrhagic fever.
Joint Product Management Office of BioDefense Therapeutics-Medical Countermeasure Systems Joint Project Management Office-US Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
International Journal of Epidemiology
Educational benefits of deworming children questioned by re-analysis of flagship study
Deworming children may not improve school attendance and the evidence that informs international policy needs to be re-appraised following a major re-analysis of data from an influential trial.
International Initiative for Impact Evaluation

Contact: Katie Steels
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-72802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Diabetes Care
Poor diabetes control found in older Americans
Only one in three older Americans have their diabetes under control as measured by guidelines set by the American Diabetes Association, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Stopping malaria in its tracks
A new drug acts as a roadblock for malaria, curing mice of established infection, according to researchers. Treatment was not associated with obvious side effects, suggesting that the drug may also be safe and effective in humans.
Wellcome Trust, National Research Foundation Singapore

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Infectious disease ecology, forest biodiversity, urban ecology featured at upcoming conference
The ecology of cities across the US, spread of infectious diseases such as Ebola, worldwide forests under siege, and how life thrives in Earth's critical zone are among the topics featured at the 2015 meeting of the Ecological Society of America, held Aug. 9-14, 2015 in Baltimore, Md.

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
New malaria treatment thwarts parasite resistance
As increasing resistance in parasites undermines the effectiveness of current drugs, two new compounds are raising hopes in the ongoing battle against malaria

Contact: Michael Jacobson
m.jacobson@griffith.edu.au
61-075-552-9250
Griffith University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1088.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>