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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 935.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Science
Secret of tetanus toxicity offers new way to treat motor neuron disease
The way that tetanus neurotoxin enters nerve cells has been discovered by UCL scientists, who showed that this process can be blocked, offering a potential therapeutic intervention for tetanus. This newly-discovered pathway could be exploited to deliver therapies to the nervous system, opening up a whole new way to treat neurological disorders such as motor neuron disease and peripheral neuropathies.
Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Siobhan Pipa
siobhan.pipa@ucl.ac.uk
44-207-679-9041
University College London

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIAID/GSK experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, prompts immune response
An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, GlaxoSmithKline

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Vaccine
Powdered measles vaccine found safe in early clinical trials
A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published Nov. 28 in the journal Vaccine. The paper is now available online.
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Robert Sievers
Bob.Sievers@colorado.edu
303-492-7943
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
BMC Public Health
International team reveals barriers to public health data-sharing; life-saving solutions
Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health announced today.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
European Heart Journal
'Utter neglect' of rheumatic heart disease revealed by results from global study
Rheumatic heart disease -- the most common acquired heart disease in children in many countries of the world -- is being neglected and poorly treated, according to new findings from the Global Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry (the REMEDY study), published online in the European Heart Journal.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
New support for structure-guided drug discovery coalition research on tropical diseases
Almost $2 million is being invested by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help fight major parasitic diseases of the developing world.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Liam Mitchell
liam.mitchell@utoronto.ca
416-978-4672
University of Toronto

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics
Educating on sickle cell risk
Members of the public in sub-Saharan Africa who are carriers of the hereditary disease sickle cell disease must be educated aggressively through public health campaigns to raise awareness of the risks of parenting offspring with the disease if their partner is also a carrier, according to research published in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Important element in the fight against sleeping sickness found
Researchers from Aarhus have now uncovered how parasites that cause the deadly sleeping sickness in Africa absorb an important nutrient from the human blood stream. The result may help the development of more effective drugs to fight the disease.

Contact: Christian Brix Folsted Andersen
cbfa@biomed.au.dk
45-87-15-43-56
Aarhus University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
ASTMH 63rd Annual Meeting
UTMB professors receive American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene national awards
Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
A global report card: Are children better off than they were 25 years ago?
UCLA's World Policy Analysis Center has published a comprehensive analysis of children's rights in 190 countries around the world.

Contact: Carla Denly
cdenly@support.ucla.edu
310-825-6738
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Tropical rickettsial illnesses associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes
A recent study from the Thai-Myanmar border highlights the severe and previously under-reported adverse impact of readily treatable tropical rickettsial illnesses, notably scrub typhus and murine typhus, on pregnancy outcomes, finding that more than one third of affected pregnancies resulted either in stillbirth or premature and/or low birth weight babies.

Contact: Lauren Bullen
plosntds@plos.org
415-590-3548
PLOS

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Genome Biology
Tapeworms on the brain expand our knowledge of their genome
A genome of a rare species of tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain has been sequenced for the first time, in research published in the open-access journal Genome Biology. The study provides insights into potential drug targets within the genome for future treatments.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease
Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year yellow fever results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease. Now a research team led by a biomedical scientist at UC Riverside has determined that the yellow fever virus, a hemorrhagic fever virus, replicates primarily in the liver; other organ failures that often follow in people with the disease are due to secondary effects.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease
Yellow fever is a disease that can result in symptoms ranging from fever to severe liver damage. Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year the disease results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Bullen
plosntds@plos.org
415-590-3548
PLOS

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Pathogens
An Ebola virus protein can cause massive inflammation and leaky blood vessels
Ebola GP protein covers the virus' surface and is shed from infected cells during infection. A study published on Nov. 20 in PLOS Pathogens reports that shed GP can trigger massive dysregulation of the immune response and affect the permeability of blood vessels

Contact: Viktor Volchkov
viktor.volchkov@inserm.fr
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Successful outcome prompts early end to sickle cell anemia clinical trial
Conclusive data show that hydroxyurea therapy offers safe and effective disease management of sickle cell anemia and reduces the risk of stroke, prompting early termination by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of a key clinical trial studying the drug's efficacy. NHLBI officials issued the announcement today, about one year before the study was originally scheduled to end.

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Monitoring Ebola cases in real-time
The current Ebola epidemic has shown how quickly a virus outbreak can turn into a global health crisis. To support of the fight against this epidemic, the German Center for Infection Research initiated the 'EBOKON' consortium, which aims to promote Ebola research and close gaps in our knowledge as quickly as possible. EBOKON is funded with 2.3 million Euros by the German Ministry of Education and Research and runs until the end of 2015.

Contact: Dr. Jan Grabowski
jan.grabowski@helmholtz-hzi.de
49-531-618-11400
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Journal of Roentgenology
New protocol for imaging patients with Ebola
A new protocol is facilitating safer portable computed radiography of patients with Ebola.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Genome Biology
Ebola surveillance may become quicker and cheaper
A new method for examining the Ebola virus genome could make surveillance quicker and cheaper for West African nations, and help detect new forms of the virus. The detailed procedure is being shared with the research community along with the study paper, which is freely available in the open-access journal Genome Biology.

Contact: Joel Winston
joel.winston@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Radiology
US radiology departments prepare for Ebola
Radiologists from the National Institutes of Health and Emory University School of Medicine have issued a special report on radiology preparedness for handling cases of Ebola virus. The report, outlining their protocols and recommendations, is published in the online edition of the journal Radiology.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Pharmaceutical industry improves access to medicine for the poor, but progress uneven
The world's leading pharmaceutical companies are doing more to improve access to medicine in developing countries, with a raft of new initiatives, scale-ups and innovations over the last two years. However, the industry struggles to perform well in some practices that matter, according to the 2014 Access to Medicine Index.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, UK Department for International Development

Contact: Suzanne Wolf
swolf@atmindex.org
31-629-404-090
Access to Medicine Foundation

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Research Institute scientists reveal weak spots in Ebola's defenses
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified weak spots on the surface of Ebola virus that are targeted by the antibodies in ZMapp, the experimental drug cocktail administered to several patients during the recent Ebola outbreak.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Ray Thomas Edwards Foundation, Burroughs Welcome Fund

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
American Public Health Association's Annual Meeting & Exposition
Creating trust in the time of Ebola
One of the key reasons the Ebola outbreak got out of control in West Africa in the early days of the crisis was a lack of trust among community members, frontline health workers and the broader health system, suggests new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research.

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Lancet
Preterm birth now leading global killer of young children
For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. Of the estimated 6.3 million deaths of children under the age of five in 2013, complications from preterm births accounted for nearly 1.1 million deaths, according to new findings published in The Lancet by a research team including Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the World Health Organization and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Contact: Marshall Hoffman
marshall@hoffmanpr.com
703-533-3535
Hoffman & Hoffman Worldwide

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Lancet
Study predicts likely Ebola cases entering UK and US through airport screening
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that screening for Ebola at airports could be an effective method for preventing the spread of the disease into the UK and US, but due to the long incubation period of the virus, screening won't detect all cases.

Contact: Samantha Martin
samantha.martin@liv.ac.uk
44-015-179-42248
University of Liverpool

Showing releases 1-25 out of 935.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>