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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 903.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NIH begins early human clinical trial of VSV Ebola vaccine
Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center. Researchers at NIAID are conducting the early phase trial to evaluate the vaccine, called VSV-ZEBOV, for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who are given two intramuscular doses, called a prime-boost strategy. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research is simultaneously testing the vaccine candidate as a single dose at its Clinical Trials Center.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kathy Stover
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Trends in Parasitology
Drones help show how environmental changes affect the spread of infectious diseases
Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, can collect detailed information in real time at relatively low cost for ecological research. In a new Opinion piece published in the Cell Press journal Trends in Parasitology, experts demonstrate that drones can be used to understand how environmental factors influence the spread of infectious diseases.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
In disease outbreak management, flexibility can save lives and money
A new, more flexible, approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks has been developed that could save many lives and millions of dollars. The approach, called 'adaptive management,' allows decision-makers to use knowledge gained during an outbreak to update ongoing interventions with the goal of containing outbreaks more quickly, efficiently, and effectively.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Lancet
Controlling Ebola in West Africa most effective way to decrease international risk: Paper
Controlling the Ebola virus outbreak at the source in West Africa is the most effective way to decrease international risk of transmission, according to a research paper to be published in The Lancet.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Chemical Communications
Scientific breakthrough will help design the antibiotics of the future
Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics -- a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
News from Annals of Internal Medicine: Conventional medical centers may be unable to prevent spread of Ebola
Below is information about an article being published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The information is not intended to substitute for the full article as a source of information. Annals of Internal Medicine attribution is required for all coverage.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
ORNL's Urban Dynamics Institute joins global fight against polio
The new Urban Dynamics Institute at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to aid polio vaccination efforts in developing countries.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Ebola highlights disparity of disease burden in developed vs. developing countries
A recent study in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows Ebola and other skin disease rates are hundreds of times higher in developing than in developed countries. The study highlights the need for disease monitoring even when the global burden of disease remains low.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
AIDS and Behavior
Study models ways to cut Mexico's HIV rates
A new study projects that increasing condom use or antiretroviral therapy among Mexico City's male sex workers would produce a significant advance against the nation's HIV epidemic by reducing the rate of infections among the sex workers' partners.
National Institutes of Health, The Mexican National Center for HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
Pattern recognition receptors may be potent new drug targets for immune-mediated diseases
Chronic inflammation caused by activation of the human immune system contributes to a large and rapidly growing list of diseases including some cancers, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Significant advances in understanding the role that the cytokine-mediated JAK/STAT signaling network and pattern recognition receptors play in regulating immune responses and their potential as novel targets for developing potent new therapies are presented in a Review article in Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
Drexel study questions 21-day quarantine period for Ebola
One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading Ebola Virus has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study by Charles Haas, Ph.D., a professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus.

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Gut
UK tops global league table for gullet cancer -- adenocarcinoma -- in men
The UK tops the international league table for a type of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, known as adenocarcinoma, in men, reveals a comprehensive estimate of the total number of new cases around the globe in 2012, and published online in the journal Gut. Worldwide, men are around four times as likely as women to develop the disease, the findings show.
World Cancer Research Fund

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Scripps Research Institute team receives $6.6 million to investigate deadly Lassa virus
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $6.6 million from the National Institutes of Health to lead an investigation of Lassa fever virus, the most prevalent virus-induced hemorrhagic fever disease in Africa. The study aims to understand how Lassa fever virus causes disease and why some patients die, while others survive the inflection.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Defective gene renders diarrhoea vaccine ineffective
Every year rotavirus causes half a million diarrhea-related deaths amongst children in developing countries. Existing vaccines provide poor protection. The reason could be a widespread genetic resistance amongst children, according to virologists at Linkoping University in Sweden.
Swedish Research Council

Contact: Johan Nordgren
johan.nordgren@liu.se
46-702-239-323
Linköping University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
New treatment target identified for aggressive breast cancer
One of the first-known oncogenes has a protein partner that helps breast cancer proliferate and when it's blocked, so is the cancer, scientists report.

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
PLOS Medicine
Frontline diagnosis and treatment of infant infections
Trained frontline health workers can identify most young infants with possible bacterial infections in low and middle income countries but also may diagnose infections in many uninfected young infants, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine. The authors, led by Anne CC Lee at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, also found that availability and affordability of first-line injectable antibiotics is low in many health facilities in Africa and South Asia.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Tip sheet from Annals of Internal Medicine Oct. 14, 2014
The Oct. 14 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine includes the following articles: Experts urge cautious use of experimental Ebola drugs; Health economists find major flaw in FDA's tobacco label regulation cost-benefit analysis; National study is first to report on medical resident knowledge of High Value Care via exam vignettes.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Canada supports 11 novel projects to tackle mental health disorders in developing nations
Marking World Mental Health Day, 11 innovators from eight countries -- Canada, Colombia, India, Pakistan, Vietnam, Jamaica, Rwanda and Peru -- will share $2.9 million in Canadian government funding for new projects to improve mental health in developing countries, one of the world's biggest unmet needs. One project aims to reduce corporal punishment in Jamaica where, according to UNICEF, 90 percent of males and 87 of females 2–14 years old experience violent discipline such as psychological aggression or physical punishment.
Grand Challenges Canada

Contact: Lode Roels
lode.roels@grandchallenges.ca
647-328-2021
Grand Challenges Canada

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Eurosurveillance
Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread
New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Researchers analyzed up-to-date epidemiological data of Ebola cases in Nigeria as of Oct. 1, 2014, in order to estimate the case fatality rate, proportion of health care workers infected, transmission progression and impact of control interventions on the size of the epidemic.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
University of Maryland School of Medicine begins Ebola vaccine trials in Mali
Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that the Center for Vaccine Development, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers and other front-line workers to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine.
Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Research Council, UK Department of International Development

Contact: David Kohn
dkohn@som.umaryland.edu
410-303-7987
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Biological Conservation
Understanding the bushmeat market: Why do people risk infection from bat meat?
Ebola, as with many emerging infections, is likely to have arisen due to man's interaction with wild animals -- most likely the practice of hunting and eating wild meat known as 'bushmeat.' A team of researchers has surveyed almost 600 people across southern Ghana to find out what drives consumption of bat bushmeat -- and how people perceive the risks associated with the practice.

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
The mathematics behind the Ebola epidemic
Researchers in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich have calculated new benchmark figures to precisely describe the Ebola epidemic in West Africa from a mathematical perspective. Their results may help health authorities to contain the epidemic.

Contact: Tanja Stadler
tanja.stadler@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-410
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Entire female reproductive tract susceptible to HIV infection in macaque model
Most women are infected with HIV through vaginal intercourse, and without effective vaccines or microbicides, women who cannot negotiate condom use by their partners remain vulnerable. How exactly the virus establishes infection in the female reproductive tract remains poorly understood. A study published on Oct. 9 in PLOS Pathogens reports surprising results from a study of HIV transmission in the FRT of rhesus macaques.

Contact: Thomas Hope
thope@northwestern.edu
PLOS

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
More deadly than Ebola: Clemson biologist fights malaria parasite
A team of molecular biologists, jointly led by Clemson University professor Jim Morris, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to identify new compounds with anti-malarial activity for a deadly parasite species that kills hundreds of thousands of people each year.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Morris
jmorri2@clemson.edu
864-656-0293
Clemson University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Timely Ebola information from Journal of Disaster Medicine & Public Health Preparedness
The DMPHP Special Edition on Ebola has been designed from the outset to be a conduit for operational and policy level information that will improve outcomes and decision making, and to ensure that this information is available to all practitioners. It has no governmental or political bias. As an academic journal DMPHP has responsibility for ensuring accountability, evidence base information, and transparency at the highest level.

Contact: Alice O'Donnell
dmphpjournal@gmail.com
240-833-4429
Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Showing releases 1-25 out of 903.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>