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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1121.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Health Affairs
Achieving effective health care with a new approach to caring for chronic illnesses
Researchers from the University of Miami and Harvard University address the challenges of effective universal health coverage in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on solving one of the most pressing issues: the care of chronic illnesses. Their suggestions, aimed at strengthening health care systems, include recommendations based on a 'diagonal approach' for managing health care.

Contact: Megan Ondrizek
University of Miami

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Cell Reports
Ebola virus mutations may help it evade drug treatment
Genetic mutations called 'escape variants' in the deadly Ebola virus appear to block the ability of antibody-based treatments to ward off infection, according to a team of US Army scientists and collaborators. Their findings, published online this week in the journal Cell Reports, have implications for the continued development of therapeutics to treat Ebola virus disease, which has claimed the lives of over 11,000 people in West Africa since last year.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Angewandte Chemie
A better class of cancer drugs
A class of therapeutic drugs known as protein kinase inhibitors has become a powerful weapon in the fight against various life-threatening diseases. One problem with these drugs, however, is that they often inhibit many different targets, which can lead to side effects and complications in therapeutic use. A recent study by SDSU chemist Jeffrey Gustafson has identified a new technique for improving the selectivity of these drugs and possibly decreasing unwanted side effects in the future.

Contact: Beth Chee
San Diego State University

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Malaria Journal
African dams linked to over 1 million malaria cases annually
A new peer-reviewed study that for the first time correlates the location of large dams with the incidence of malaria and quantifies the impacts across sub-Saharan Africa. The study looked at over 1,200 dams and found that the population at risk for malaria around dams is at least four times greater than previously estimated.

Contact: James Clarke
Burness Communications

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Poor diet and high blood pressure now number 1 risk factors for death
New global burden of disease study finds a huge amount of deaths worldwide are due to preventable risk-factors.

Contact: Jane Gardner
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Cancer Epidemiology
Breast cancer incidence, death rates rising in some economically transitioning countries
A new study finds breast cancer incidence and death rates are increasing in several low and middle income countries, even as death rates have declined in most high income countries, despite increasing or stable incidence rates.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
The Lancet
Avoidable risk factors take an increasing toll on health worldwide
A wide range of avoidable risk factors to health -- ranging from air pollution to poor diets to unsafe water -- account for a growing number of deaths and a significant amount of disease burden, according to a new analysis of 79 risks in 188 countries.

Contact: Rhonda Stewart
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
Ebola virus disease in Liberia
A newly published research study by US Forest Service researchers demonstrates that the social vulnerability indices used in climate change and natural hazards research can also be used in other contexts such as disease outbreaks. Authors of the article include Forest Service Southern Research Station researchers John Stanturf, Scott Goodrick, Mel Warren, and Christie Stegall, and Susan Charnley from the Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Contact: John Stanturf
USDA Forest Service ‑ Southern Research Station

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Brain plasticity in the most dreaded biblical disease
A new study shows that nerve damage caused by leprosy is associated to changes in the brain of patients.
National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development, Carlos Chagas Filho Foundation for Research Support in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian Innovation Agency, and others

Contact: Claudia Vargas
Publicase Comunicação Científica

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Study IDs viral protein that causes dengue shock
UC Berkeley scientists have identified a viral protein secreted by cells infected with the dengue virus as a key culprit behind the fluid loss and resulting shock that are the hallmark of severe -- and potentially fatal -- infections.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Sarah Yang
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
Science Translational Medicine
UQ scientists close in on first dengue treatment
Clinical trials for a dengue fever treatment could start within a year, following a discovery by University of Queensland scientists. UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences Head Professor Paul Young said the researchers had identified similarities in how the body reacted to dengue virus and bacterial infections, in a finding that would allow them to repurpose existing drugs.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Paul Young
University of Queensland

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
The FASEB Journal
Hypertension in professional football players likely results from trauma on the field
The regular physical trauma that appears to put professional football players at risk for degenerative brain disease may also increase their risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, researchers say.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Pitt researchers developing a novel way to identify pathogens
The University of Pittsburgh's Xinyu Liu, Sanford Asher, and colleagues may have found a faster method to identify pathogens.

Contact: Joe Miksch
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative unveils new plan for neglected patients
After having built the world's largest drug development pipeline for the most neglected diseases, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative has unveiled plans for a more flexible, dynamic portfolio approach, integrating various operating models to better respond to the needs of patients, notably in low- and middle-income countries. The plan also paves the way for new diseases to be taken up in DNDi's portfolio.

Contact: Violaine Dällenbach
Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health ECTMIH
Clinical trial for first oral drug candidate specifically developed for sleeping sickness
The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative has announced today at the 9th European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health in Basel, Switzerland, the successful completion of Phase I human clinical trials for SCYX-7158 (AN5568), the first oral drug candidate specifically developed from the earliest drug discovery stage to combat human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a deadly parasitic disease transmitted by the tsetse fly.

Contact: Violaine Dällenbach
Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Umeå researcher explains the increase in dengue epidemics in Singapore
Population growth and increased temperature are the most important explanations to the significant increase of dengue incidence in Singapore since the 1970s. This is shown in a study undertaken by Joacim Rocklöv and his colleagues at the unit of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University in Sweden, published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Mattias Grundström Mitz
Umea University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Swedish surgical research stops suffering for millions of impoverished citizens
Mosquito mesh cannot just prevent malaria, but can also be used to reduce the suffering caused by groin hernia. A surgical operation using mosquito mesh to repair the hernia can give millions of people a chance at a better life. This according to a study performed in collaboration with Umeå University, Sweden.

Contact: Mattias Grundström Mitz
Umea University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Iron supplementation during pregnancy and risk of malaria in malaria-endemic region
Among women in a malaria-endemic region in Kenya, daily iron supplementation during pregnancy did not result in an increased risk of malaria, according to a study in the Sept. 8 issue of JAMA. Iron supplementation did result in increased birth weight, gestational duration, neonatal length, and a decreased risk of low birth weight and prematurity.

Contact: Martin N. Mwangi
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Nature: Study creates cell immunity to parasite that infects 50 million
Multi-institution, multidisciplinary study applies cancer science technique to field of infectious diseases to pinpoint human genes that allow parasite E. histolytica to cause cell death.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Health Affairs
Global health studies in September Health Affairs
The September issue of Health Affairs includes articles examining the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases, both in the United States and elsewhere.

Contact: Amy Martin Vogt
Health Affairs

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
IASLC issues new statement on tobacco control and smoking cessation
The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer today issued a new statement on Tobacco Control and Smoking Cessation at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Denver. The statement calls for higher taxes on tobacco products, comprehensive advertising and promotion bans of all tobacco products and product regulation including pack warnings.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mobile phone records may predict epidemics of mosquito-borne dengue virus
A new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers finds cell phone records can predict the geographical spread and timing of dengue epidemics. Utilizing the largest data set of cell phone records ever analyzed to estimate human mobility, the researchers developed an innovative model to predict epidemics and provide early warning to policy makers.
James S. McDonnell Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study

Contact: Marge Dwyer
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Rapid testing for TB aims to reduce drug resistance, lower mortality rate
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have documented the accuracy of three new tests for more rapidly diagnosing drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis, which are much harder and more expensive to treat and which, experts say, represent a major threat to global public health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Scott LaFee
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Cirrhosis, antibodies increase risk of poor outcome for autoimmune hepatitis patients
New research reports that cirrhosis at first diagnosis and antibodies for the soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas antigen are major risk factors for poor short- and long-term outcome in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

Contact: Dawn Peters

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
UC San Diego scientists investigate global hemorrhagic fever bacterial disease
An international research team, headed by Joseph Vinetz, M.D., professor of medicine at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and director of the UC San Diego Center for Tropical Medicine and Travelers Health, has been awarded a five-year, $1.89 million cooperative agreement to carry out transnational research studies of leptospirosis, an infectious and sometimes fatal bacterial disease endemic in much of the world.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Scott LaFee
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1121.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>