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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1256.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Optometry and Vision Science
108 million people have correctable vision impairment, global study estimates
Uncorrected refractive error -- nearsightedness, farsightedness, and other focusing problems correctable by prescription lenses -- is responsible for moderate to severe vision impairment in 101 million people and blindness in seven million people worldwide, reports a study in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Parasites & Vectors
Insecticide-treated nets may still prevent malaria despite mosquito resistance
Insecticide-treated nets may still help prevent malaria despite mosquitoes developing resistance, which may provide a clue to why it has been hard to demonstrate the impact of this resistance on malaria as a public health problem, according to new research by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Malaria Consortium.
UK Aid

Contact: Jenny Orton
press@lshtm.ac.uk
020-792-72802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
BMJ Global Health
Study finds 36 percent increase in number of male smokers in India
The number of men smoking tobacco in India rose by more than one-third to 108 million between 1998 and 2015, according to a new study published today in the journal BMJ Global Health.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Single antibody from human survivor protects nonhuman primates against Ebola virus
A single monoclonal antibody isolated from a human survivor of Ebola virus disease (EVD) completely protected monkeys from lethal infection with the virus, according to research published in today's online edition of the journal Science. Importantly, the antibody, known as mAb114, was effective even when given five days after exposure to Ebola virus, suggesting that it could hold promise as a potential treatment for human cases of EVD.
Intramural Research Program of the Vaccine Research Center, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Post-Ebola syndrome in Sierra Leone
Researchers from the University's Institute of Translational Medicine have conducted a study of Ebola survivors to describe the medical problems they continue to have after recovering from the acute disease. The results of which have been published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Contact: Simon Wood
simon.wood@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-8356
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Trends in Parasitology
Zeroing in on 'super spreaders' and other hidden patterns of epidemics
The complex properties driving today's disease transmission -- and the speed at which an epidemic can travel -- call for new methods of surveillance. Researchers propose a novel way of developing mathematical models of infectious diseases to uncover hidden patterns of transmission.

Contact: Carol Clark
carol.clark@emory.edu
404-727-0501
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Experimental Ebola antibody protects monkeys
NIAID scientists and colleagues have discovered that a single monoclonal antibody isolated from a human Ebola virus disease survivor protected non-human primates when given as late as five days after lethal Ebola infection. The antibody can now advance to testing in humans as a potential treatment for Ebola virus disease. There are currently no licensed treatments for Ebola infection, which caused more than 11,000 deaths in the 2014-2015 outbreak in West Africa.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Water-cleaning chemical made 'on-demand' with new group of catalysts
A quick, cheap and highly efficient method for producing a water-purifying chemical has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University.

Contact: Michael Bishop
bishopm1@cardiff.ac.uk
029-208-74499
Cardiff University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Zika virus linked to stillbirth, other symptoms in Brazil
In January, a pregnant Brazilian woman infected with the Zika virus had a stillborn baby who had signs of severe tissue swelling as well as central nervous system defects that caused near-complete loss of brain tissue. It is the first report to indicate a possible association of congenital Zika virus and damage to tissues outside the central nervous system, said Yale researchers.

Contact: Michael Greenwood
michael.greenwood@yale.edu
203-737-5151
Yale University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
PLOS Pathogens
Nitric oxide protects against parasite invasion and brain inflammation by keeping the blood brain barrier intact
African trypanosomiasis is called 'sleeping sickness' because when the infection is untreated, trypanosome parasites will invade the brain and cause disruption of sleeping patterns and irreversible neurological damage. A study published on Feb. 25 in PLOS Pathogens reports that in a mouse model of trypanosome disease, nitric oxide plays an unexpected role in preserving the integrity of the blood brain barrier, thereby reducing parasite invasion into the brain, and likely limiting neurological damage.

Contact: Martin Rottenberg
Martin.Rottenberg@ki.se
PLOS

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
Human Gene Therapy
Update on advances in gene therapy From National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences
New initiatives by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) to use gene therapy approaches to treat rare diseases and especially promising aspects of gene transfer and gene editing technology, such as adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors and CRISPR-Cas9 are highlighted in an editorial published in Human Gene Therapy.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
2016 68th AAN Annual Meeting
Most Ebola survivors in study experienced brain symptoms 6 months after infection
Most of the 82 Ebola survivors in a new study from the world's largest Ebola outbreak had brain symptoms more than six months after the initial infection. The preliminary results will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. The study is part of the larger Prevail III study, which follows patients with prior Ebola virus disease and their close contacts who serve as study controls.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Study: Experimental Ebola drug ZMapp may benefit patients, but insufficient data
According to initial results from a randomized, controlled trial of the experimental Ebola treatment ZMapp, the monoclonal antibody cocktail was well-tolerated and showed promise. Due to decreasing incidence in Ebola, the study could not enroll enough volunteers to determine definitively whether it is a better treatment for Ebola virus disease than supportive care only. Initial findings from the clinical trial known as PREVAIL II were presented today at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Ebola survivor study yields insights on complications of disease
Preliminary findings from PREVAIL III, a study of Ebola virus disease (EVD) survivors being conducted in Liberia, indicate that both Ebola survivors and their close contacts have a high burden of illness. However, the prevalence of eye, musculoskeletal, and neurological complications was greater among the individuals who survived EVD.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID News Office
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Experimental Ebola vaccines well tolerated, immunogenic in phase 2 study
Two investigational vaccines designed to protect against Ebola virus disease were well-tolerated and induced an immune response among 1,000 vaccinated participants in the Phase 2 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial called PREVAIL I. These findings were presented by one of the co-principal investigators, Fatorma Bolay, Ph.D., director of the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research, this evening at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID News Office
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
23rd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
NIH-funded study finds effect of PrEP on bone density is reversible
The slight loss in bone mineral density associated with HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) antiretroviral use is reversible in young adult patients who stop taking the drugs, according to findings presented by researchers today at the 23rd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Boston. PrEP is an HIV prevention strategy in which at-risk HIV-negative people take a daily pill of Truvada, which contains the antiretroviral drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine, to prevent them from becoming infected.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Judith Lavelle
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
ACS Nano
Counting molecules with an ordinary cell phone
The new visual readout method to count individual nucleic acid molecules within a sample can be performed by any cell-phone camera.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
mBio
Bacteria overgrowth could be major cause of stunting in children
Excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestine could be damaging the gut of young children, leading to stunting, scientists from the US and Bangladesh have discovered.

Contact: Josh Barney
jdb9a@virginia.edu
434-906-8864
University of Virginia Health System

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
EBioMedicine
Dietary link to stunted growth identified
A team of researchers has found that inadequate dietary intake of essential amino acids and the nutrient choline is linked to stunting, a debilitating condition that affects millions of children worldwide.
National Institutes of Health, Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging, Children's Discovery Institute of Washington University and St. Louis Children's Hospital, Hickey Family Foundation

Contact: Judy Martin Finch
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Society of Critical Care Medicine's 45th Critical Care Congress
JAMA
Feinstein Institute researcher presents new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, vice chair of research in the Department of Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center and an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, presented new definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis and septic shock at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 45th Critical Care Congress in Orlando, FL. He was also corresponding author for an article outlining the findings that was published February 23 in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Contact: Emily Ng
eng3@nshs.edu
516-562-2670
Northwell Health

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Option B+ to prevent maternal transmission of HIV shows rise in women initiating therapy
The first findings from a study in the Kingdom of Swaziland on a new approach to reduce mother to child transmission of HIV were presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) in Boston. show that implementation of Option B+ greatly increased the number of women initiating ART and dramatically improved ART coverage among pregnant women.
USAID, PEPFAR

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
EBioMedicine
Food-based proteins discovered as key to child malnutrition in developing countries
Contrary to popular belief among world relief workers, children in developing countries may not be eating enough protein, which could contribute to stunted growth, a Johns Hopkins-directed study suggests.

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Tackling Zika -- using bacteria as a Trojan horse
Bacteria in the gut of disease-bearing insects -- including the mosquito which carries the Zika virus -- can be used as a Trojan horse to help control the insects' population, new research at Swansea University has shown. The results showed declines in fertility of up to 100 percent and an increase of 60 percent in the mortality rate of larvae, among the insects studied. The findings offer the prospect of a much more targeted approach to insect control.

Contact: Kevin Sullivan
k.g.sullivan@swansea.ac.uk
Swansea University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
PLOS Medicine
Health and development in infants after mefloquine antimalarial treatment during pregnancy
Early development does not appear to be affected in children born to mothers who were treated with the antimalarial mefloquine during pregnancy compared to children of mothers treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, according to research appearing this week in PLOS Medicine.

Contact: PLOS Medicine
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
New England Journal of Medicine
Vaginal ring provides partial protection from HIV in large multinational trial
A ring that continuously releases an experimental antiretroviral drug in the vagina safely provided a modest level of protection against HIV infection in women, a large clinical trial in four sub-Saharan African countries has found. The ring reduced the risk of HIV infection by 27 percent in the study population overall and by 61 percent among women ages 25 years and older, who used the ring most consistently.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1256.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>