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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1120.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Lancet Global Health
Less effective antimalarial therapies can help fight malaria better
Oxford University scientists have found that the more effective way to beat malaria is to use less effective drugs some of the time: simultaneously using a non-artemisinin therapy amongst more effective artemisinin-based combinations slows the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites.
Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council, Li Ka Shing Foundation

Contact: Tom Calver
University of Oxford

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
HIV spreads faster as violent conflict looms
A new Brown University analysis of HIV incidence in 36 sub-Saharan African countries finds that new HIV infections rise significantly in the five years before armed conflict breaks out.

Contact: David Orenstein
Brown University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Global health team pioneers development of a new antimalarial drug screening model
A University of South Florida Center for Global Health & Infectious Diseases Research team has demonstrated a new screening model to classify antimalarial drugs and to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
The Lancet
Researchers call for investment in cancer control in low- and middle-income countries
Investments in cancer control -- prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care -- are increasingly needed in low- and, particularly, middle-income countries, where most of the world's cancer deaths occur, a paper published today in The Lancet recommends.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Research points to development of single vaccine for Chikungunya, related viruses
What if a single vaccine could protect people from infection by many different viruses? That concept is a step closer to reality. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified 'broadly neutralizing' antibodies that protect against infection by multiple, distantly related alphaviruses -- including Chikungunya virus -- that cause fever and debilitating joint pain. The discovery, in mice, lays the groundwork for a single vaccine or antibody-based treatment against many different alphaviruses.
National Institutes of Health, Dutch Organization for Scientific Research, University Medical Center Groningen

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dengue: Asymptomatic people transmit the virus to mosquitoes
Scientists at the Institut Pasteur in Cambodia, the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the CNRS provided proof that people infected by dengue virus but showing no clinical symptoms can actually infect mosquitoes that bite them. It appears that these asymptomatic people -- who, together with mildly symptomatic patients, represent three-quarters of all dengue infections -- could be involved in the transmission chain of the virus.
European Union's 7th Framework Program, 'Integrative Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases' (IBEID) Laboratory of Excellence

Contact: Myriam Rebeyrotte
Institut Pasteur

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Computer model reveals deadly route of Ebola outbreak
A research team led by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health mapped the spread of the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, providing the most detailed picture to date on the disease spread and identifying two critical opportunities to control the epidemic. The novel statistical method gives health authorities a new tool to plan interventions to contain future outbreaks in real time, and not just of Ebola.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Homeland Security

Contact: Tim Paul
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Environmental Health Perspectives
Children exposed to arsenic may face greater risk of infection, respiratory symptoms
Children born to women who were exposed to higher arsenic during pregnancy have a greater risk of infections and respiratory symptoms within their first year of life, a Dartmouth College-led study shows.

Contact: John Cramer
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Sharjah meeting brings together global partners in health
Leaders from the American College of Cardiology will gather this month with more than 200 health leaders and key stakeholders in the United Arab Emirates attending the first Global NCD Alliance Forum, which will convene global health leaders to discuss how the global community can come together to reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Contact: Katie Glenn
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Scientists mark 'stunning success' of vaccine in virtually ridding Africa of meningitis A
Five years after the introduction of an affordable conjugate meningitis A vaccine, immunization has led to the control and near elimination of deadly meningitis A disease in the African 'meningitis belt.' In 2013, only four laboratory-confirmed cases of meningitis A were reported by the 26 countries in the meningitis belt.

Contact: Preeti Singh
Burness Communications

Public Release: 8-Nov-2015
Journal of Medical Entomology
New disease-carrying mosquito arrives in B.C.
A team of researchers from Simon Fraser University and Culex Environmental, a Burnaby-based mosquito control company, are studying an invasive, disease-carrying mosquito, Aedes japonicus, after finding it for the first time in Western Canada. The mosquitos could poise a significant hazard to health if global warming favours the development of some of the viruses it can transmit.

Contact: Peter Belton
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Scottish university scientist behind successful rapid-detection Ebola test
A rapid-detection Ebola test developed by international scientists has been deployed in Senegal and Guinea following a highly effective pilot project. Dr. Manfred Weidmann, from the University of Stirling, Scotland was part of a Wellcome Trust project led by the Pasteur Institute of Dakar. They developed a sophisticated point-of-care saliva test, all contained within a suitcase-sized mobile laboratory. A test evaluation of 928 samples showed it performs exceptionally well under field conditions.
Wellcome Trust Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises

Contact: David Christie
University of Stirling

Public Release: 4-Nov-2015
Therapies against biowarfare subject of $7.6 million Defense grant to Pitt vaccine scientists
The US Department of Defense has awarded a $7.6 million grant to a collaborative group of scientists in the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research for groundbreaking work that could lead to countermeasures against bioterrorism attacks.
US Department of Defense

Contact: Allison Hydzik
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2015
PLOS Medicine
Relapsing infections could challenge malaria eradication
Eliminating malaria in the Asia-Pacific could prove more challenging than previously thought, with new research showing that most childhood malaria infections in endemic areas are the result of relapsed, not new, infections.
TransEPI Consortium, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Health and Medical Research Council, Swiss National Science Foundation, Cellex Foundation, and others

Contact: Liz Williams
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Professor receives grant to seek a cure for a leading cause of death in children under 5
Lesly Temesvari, an Alumni Distinguished Professor and Fulbright Scholar in Clemson University's biological sciences department, has been awarded a two-year, $290,400 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lesly Temesvari
Clemson University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Link between small mammals and evolution of hepatitis A virus to humans discovered
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are part of an international team led by the University of Bonn, Germany, who have found a link between the origin of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and small mammals. With the emergence of Ebola virus from bats and hantaviruses from rodents, investigators say identifying the other species infected with HAV provides novel insight into the evolution of HAV and how it spread to humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Morag MacLachlan
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The hepatitis A virus is of animal origin
The hepatitis A virus can trigger acute liver inflammation which generally has a mild course in small children but which can become dangerous in adults. The virus has previously been considered to be a purely human pathogen. An international team of researchers under the direction of the University of Bonn has now discovered that the hepatitis A virus is of likely animal origin. The results currently appear in the renowned journal PNAS.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Jan Felix Drexler
University of Bonn

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Early hospitalization key to survival for Ebola victims
Scientists looked at data from nearly 1,000 cases over 38 years in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which has experienced more Ebola outbreaks than any other country since the virus was discovered in 1976.

Contact: Zoe Dunford

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Vast energy value in human waste: UN University
UN University's Canadian-based water institute estimates that biogas potentially available from human waste worldwide would have a value of up to US$ 9.5 billion in natural gas equivalent. And the residue, dried and charred, could produce 2 million tonnes of charcoal-equivalent fuel, curbing the destruction of trees. The large energy value would prove small, however, relative to that of the global health and environmental benefits that would accrue from the safe treatment of human waste in low-resource settings.

Contact: Terry Collins
United Nations University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
US and Mexico must jointly combat Chagas disease
Chagas disease -- the third most common parasitic infection in the world -- affects approximately 7.5 million people, mostly in Latin America. To help reduce outbreaks of this disease in their countries, the United States and Mexican governments should implement a range of programs as well as fund research for the development of Chagas vaccines and treatments, according to a new policy brief by tropical-disease and science policy experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
BIDMC researchers win 2015 Dvorak Young Investigator Award
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center scientists Anders Berg, M.D., Ph.D., and David Friedman, M.D., whose research is exploring genetic changes underlying kidney disease, have been awarded the 2015 Dvorak Young Investigator Award.

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Substantial differences in obstetric care for First Nations women in Canada: BC study
There are substantial differences in obstetric care provided to First Nations women compared with women in the general population, and these differences may contribute to higher infant mortality in First Nations populations, according to research published in Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 1-Nov-2015
Expert Review of Vaccines
Could self-disseminating vaccines cut off emerging infectious diseases at source?
An expert review identifies state-of-the-art of self-disseminating vaccines as a new and potentially powerful strategy to circumvent diseases such as Ebola at the animal source before their establishment as the next human pandemic

Contact: Andrew Gould
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
UTMB researchers help discover simple, affordable diagnostic kit for chikungunya
A novel and affordable diagnostic test for chikungunya will soon be available thanks to the work of researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in partnership with a commercial lab.

Contact: Christopher Smith Gonzalez
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015
HIV/AIDS deaths are down in South Africa -- But most are still unacknowledged
After peaking in 2007, AIDS mortality in South Africa has decreased with the widespread introduction of effective antiretroviral therapy, according to updated estimates published in AIDS, official journal of the International AIDS Society. AIDS is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Wolters Kluwer Health

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1120.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>