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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 401-425 out of 1090.

<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Stem Cells and Development
Does gestational diabetes affect the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord-derived stem cells?
Multipotent cells isolated from the human umbilical cord, called mesenchymal stromal cells, have shown promise for use in cell therapy to treat a variety of human diseases. However, intriguing new evidence shows that mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from women with gestational diabetes demonstrate premature aging, poorer cell growth, and altered metabolic function, as reported in an article in Stem Cells and Development.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
mBio
Genetic changes in Ebola virus could impede potential treatments
Scientists studying the genetic makeup of the Ebola virus currently circulating in West Africa have identified several mutations that could have implications for developing effective drugs to fight the virus. In today's online edition of the journal mBio, senior author Dr. Gustavo F. Palacios and colleagues describe the 'genomic drift,' or natural evolution of the virus, and how it may interrupt the action of potential therapies designed to target the virus's genetic sequence.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Nature Genetics
Genetics underpinning antimalarial drug resistance revealed
Researchers have identified a series of mutations that could help to improve early detection of resistance to our most effective antimalarial drug. The largest genome-wide association study of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to date reveals that the Kelch 13 gene, a known marker of resistance to the drug artemisinin, only works if a set of other mutations is also present.
Wellcome Trust, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Resource Centre for Genomic Epidemiology of Malaria, Wellcome Trust Mahidol University Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme, The Centre for Genomics and Glob

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
01-223-492-368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Lassa fever controls need to consider human-human transmission and role of super spreaders
One in five cases of Lassa fever -- a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa -- could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by 'super-spreaders,' according to research published today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Cochrane Review
IPT for children with anaemia
Researchers from Tanzania and South Africa, who are part of the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to assess the effect of intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment for children with anaemia living in malaria endemic regions.

Contact: Clare Bebb
clare.bebb@lstmed.ac.uk
44-015-170-53135
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Estimating the best time of year for malaria interventions in Africa
New methods for analyzing malaria transmission can estimate the best time of year to carry out campaigns such as mass drug treatment and spraying of houses with insecticide.

Contact: Jamie Griffin
jamie.griffin@imperial.ac.uk
020-759-41451
PLOS

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Diabetes Care
Healthy diet associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in minority women
Consuming a healthy diet was associated with reduced risk for type 2 diabetes among women in all racial and ethnic groups but conferred an even greater benefit for Asian, Hispanic, and black women, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
PLOS Biology
New model predicts Ebola epidemic in Liberia could be ended by June
The Ebola epidemic in Liberia could likely be eliminated by June if the current high rate of hospitalization and vigilance can be maintained, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia and Pennsylvania State University ecologists. The model includes such factors as infection and treatment location, hospital capacity development and safe burial practice adoption and is 'probably the first to include all those elements,' said UGA's John Drake, who led the project.
NIH/Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: John M. Drake
jdrake@uga.edu
706-583-5539
University of Georgia

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Grant funds effort to keep South African men in HIV care
In a country with especially high rates of HIV infection, many men in South Africa do not receive testing and treatment. Mark Lurie, assistant professor of epidemiology and medicine, will work with collaborators in Cape Town to test a new program to better retain men in care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
The challenges of providing obstetric care during an Ebola epidemic
Obstetric interventions during an Ebola epidemic are deeply challenging say two new commentaries published today in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Contact: Rebecca Jones
rjones@rcog.org.uk
44-020-777-26444
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Progress toward an HIV cure highlighted in special issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
A cure for HIV/AIDS is the ultimate goal of rapidly advancing research involving diverse and innovative approaches. A comprehensive collection of articles describing the broad scope and current status of this global effort is published in a special issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Technology
Fast sorting of CD4+ T cells from whole blood using glass microbubbles
This report demonstrated a new cell sorting technology for isolating CD4 positive T cells which may be used for HIV disease monitoring in resource-limited areas such as the developing countries in Africa.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Bioinformatics
Software created to help find a cure for a 'great neglected disease'
For decades, scientists around the world have worked to develop a treatment for schistosomiasis, a debilitating water-born parasite. To aid this research, scientists at San Francisco State University have developed software that helps assess the impact of a drug on the parasite. Singh and his team recently completed the Quantal Dose Response Calculator, software that analyzes images showing the effects of potential drugs on parasites and quantifies their effectiveness.

Contact: Beth Tagawa
btagawa@sfsu.edu
415-338-6745
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hybrid 'super mosquito' resistant to insecticide-treated bed nets
A hybrid mosquito, resulting from interbreeding of two malaria mosquitoes, now has the ability to survive the insecticides used to treat bed nets -- which have been key to preventing the spread of malaria in humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Study links birth control shot to moderately increased risk of HIV infection
An analysis of 12 observational studies from sub-Saharan Africa involving 39,560 women has found that use of an injectable birth control moderately increased the risk of becoming infected with HIV. The risk increased by 40 percent compared with women using other contraceptive methods or no birth control.

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Science
Treatment for parasitic worms helps animals survive infectious diseases -- and spread them
In a new study of African buffalo, University of Georgia ecologist Vanessa Ezenwa has found that de-worming drastically improves an animal's chances of surviving bovine tuberculosis -- but with the consequence of increasing the spread of TB in the population.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
PLOS Pathogens
Study links common human protein to adverse parasitic worm infections
Worm infections represent a major global public health problem, leading to a variety of debilitating diseases and conditions. Scientists at the University of California, Riverside and colleagues have made a discovery that could lead to more effective diagnostic and treatment strategies for worm infections and their symptoms. The researchers found that resistin, an immune protein commonly found in human serum, instigates an inappropriate inflammatory response to worm infections, impairing the clearance of the worm.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kathy Barton
kathryn.barton@ucr.edu
951-827-4598
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
WHO grants approval for safe, effective meningitis A vaccine for infants
The World Health Organization has opened the door to routine immunization of infants in sub-Saharan Africa by approving for use an innovative and affordable vaccine that has all but rid the meningitis belt of a major cause of deadly epidemics.

Contact: Katy Lenard
klenard@burnesscommunications.com
301-280-5719
Burness Communications

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Science
Deworming programs in animal, human populations may have unwanted impacts
A study of the effects of worming medications on infectious disease in wildlife herds showed an unexpected and alarming result -- it helped reduce individual deaths from a bovine tuberculosis infection, but hugely increased the potential for spread of the disease to other animals. The findings suggest that some treatments may increase problems with diseases they were meant to reduce.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Jolles
jollesa@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4719
Oregon State University

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Ben-Gurion University researchers discover that AAT drug may prevent deadly infections
In the study, mice were directly infected with highly lethal live bacteria, sepsis and peritonitis. The initial aim was to exclude the possibility that AAT, might worsen infections in patients who are being treated with the drug. AAT is currently being used to treat new clinical indications like type 1 diabetes, emphysema and graft versus host disease. Instead, the BGU research group unexpectedly discovered that the treated mice combatted these lethal infections better than the untreated mice.

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-353-2505
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Pneumonia risk far higher for HIV-positive children, study shows
HIV-positive children in developing countries are six times more likely to die from pneumonia than children without the virus, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests.
World Health Organisation

Contact: Andrew Moffat
andrew.moffat@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-9836
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Whole plant therapy shows promise to beat malaria parasites' drug resistance
For decades, physicians and public health officials worldwide have been thwarted by the malaria parasite's ability to evolve resistance to the succession of drugs developed to treat it. But now University of Massachusetts Amherst microbiologist Stephen Rich and his research team report an effective and sustainable malaria intervention that shows great promise in laboratory models.
UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 1-Jan-2015
Science
Killing for DNA: A predatory device in the cholera bacterium
Publishing in Science, EPFL scientists have uncovered the unconventional way that the cholera bacterium stabs and kills other bacteria to steal their DNA, making it potentially more virulent.
Swiss National Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Speeding up Ebola drug production
Researchers at the University of California, Davis will explore ways to speed production of the Ebola drug with a $200,000 rapid-response grant from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
PLOS Medicine
Malaria combination drug therapy for children
A drug combination of artemisinin-naphthoquine should be considered for the treatment of children with uncomplicated malaria in settings where multiple parasite species cause malaria according to Tim Davis from University of Western Australia, Fremantle, Australia and colleagues in new research published in this week's PLOS Medicine.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Showing releases 401-425 out of 1090.

<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>