sponsored byAAAS Golden Fund

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
21-Apr-2014 01:55
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Options

Portal Home

Glossary

Background Articles

Research Papers

Meetings

Links & Resources

Portal: Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 651-675 out of 890.

<< < 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 10-Oct-2012
How to address mental disorders in developing countries, 'the most neglected of neglected diseases'
Canadian funding of $19.4 million will support 15 landmark projects to improve mental health diagnosis and care in developing countries: "the most neglected of neglected diseases." Many projects address problems in nations ravaged by conflict and disaster as well as poverty. Of almost 450 million people with mental health disorders, over 75% live in developing countries. WHO estimates 85% of those with serious mental disorders in the developing world receive no treatment at all.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
Sandra Rotman Centre for Global Health

Public Release: 9-Oct-2012
PLOS Medicine
Most pregnancy-related infections are caused by 4 treatable conditions
In low-and-middle income countries, pregnancy-related infections are a major cause of maternal death, can also be fatal to unborn and newborn babies, and are mostly caused by four types of conditions that are treatable and preventable, according to a review by US researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine.

Contact: Sumrina Yousufzai
syousufzai@plos.org
415-568-3164
PLOS

Public Release: 8-Oct-2012
Emerging Infectious Diseases
MRSA researchers identify new class of drug effective against superbug
In two separate published studies, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have discovered a new class of treatment against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as well as evidence of a growing need to quickly genotype individual strains of the organism most commonly referred to as the "superbug."
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: David Crawford
david.crawford@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2012
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health awards Dean's Medal to William Foege
Michael J. Klag, M.D., M.P.H., dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has awarded the Dean's Medal -- the School's highest honor -- to William Foege, M.D., M.P.H.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 3-Oct-2012
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Chloroquine makes comeback to combat malaria
Malaria-drug monitoring over the past 30 years has shown that malaria parasites develop resistance to medicine, and the first signs of resistance to the newest drugs have just been observed. At the same time, resistance monitoring at the University of Copenhagen shows that the previously efficacious drug chloroquine is once again beginning to work against malaria. In time that will ensure cheaper treatment for the world's poor.

Contact: Michael Alifrangis
micali@sund.ku.dk
45-23-45-18-04
University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
Langmuir
Sticky paper offers cheap, easy solution for paper-based diagnostics
Global health researchers are working on cheap systems like a home-based pregnancy test that might work for malaria, diabetes or other diseases. A new chemical technique makes medically interesting molecules stick to regular paper -- a possible route to building such paper-based diagnostics from paper you could buy at an office-supply store.
Washington Research Foundation, University of Washington's Royalty Research Fund

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
Frontiers in Optics 2012
3-D medical scanner: New handheld imaging device to aid doctors on the 'diagnostic front lines'
Engineers have created a new imaging tool for primary care physicians: a handheld scanner that would enable them to image all the sites they commonly examine--such as inner ears or the health of patients' retinas. The device relies on optical coherence tomography and could offer sooner and better diagnoses for common conditions such as diabetes. The team will present their findings at the Optical Society's Annual Meeting, Frontiers in Optics 2012.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
WHO prequalifies a new artemisinin-based combination treatment for malaria
Cipla, one of the leading generic pharmaceutical companies, along with the non-profit research and development organization Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative today announced the prequalification of the fixed dose combination of Artesunate and Mefloquine – ASMQ FDC – by the World Health Organization. This Cipla-manufactured ASMQ FDC is the first artesunate-mefloquine FDC to be prequalified by WHO and is recommended for the treatment of malaria.

Contact: Violaine Dällenbach
vdallenbach@dndi.org
41-794-241-474
Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
PLOS Medicine
Obesity and under-nutrition prevalent in long-term refugees living in camps
A quarter of households in refugee camps in Algeria are currently suffering from the double burden of excess weight and under-nutrition. According to a study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, obesity is an emerging threat to this community, with one in two women of childbearing age being overweight, whilst nutritional deficiencies such as iron-deficiency anemia and stunted growth remain a persistent problem.
European Community Humanitarian Office, UNHCR, UN

Contact: David Weston
d.weston@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83844
University College London

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
PLOS Medicine
A national mental health policy for Uganda
In another installment of the PLOS Medicine series on Global Mental Health Practice, Joshua Ssebunnya from the Butabika National Referral and Teaching Mental Hospital in Kampala and colleagues describe their work developing a national mental health policy for Uganda.

Contact: Sumrina Yousufzai
syousufzai@plos.org
415-568-3164
PLOS

Public Release: 2-Oct-2012
PLOS Medicine
Both obesity and under-nutrition affect long-term refugee populations
Both obesity and under-nutrition are common in women and children from the Western Sahara living in refugee camps in Algeria, highlighting the need to balance both obesity prevention and management with interventions to tackle under-nutrition in this population, according to a study by international researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine.

Contact: Sumrina Yousufzai
syousufzai@plos.org
415-568-3164
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Sep-2012
PLOS Pathogens
Genetic sleuthing uncovers deadly new virus in Africa
An isolated outbreak of a deadly disease known as acute hemorrhagic fever, which killed two people and left one gravely ill in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the summer of 2009, was probably caused by a novel virus scientists have never seen before.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jason.bardi@ucsf.edu
415-502-4608
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 27-Sep-2012
Controlling the spread of diseases among humans, other animals and the environment
West Nile virus, Lyme disease and hantavirus are all infectious diseases spreading in animals and in people. Is human interaction with the environment somehow responsible for the increase in incidence of these diseases?

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2012
International Journal of Critical Infrastructures
Sandia probability maps help sniff out food contamination
Uncovering the sources of fresh food contamination could become faster and easier thanks to analysis done at Sandia National Laboratories' National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC).
Department of Homeland Security

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 27-Sep-2012
Lancet
Study highlights the burden of epilepsy in the developing world
The burden of epilepsy in poorer parts of the world could be readily alleviated by reducing the preventable causes and improving access to treatment, according to a review article funded by the Wellcome Trust.
Wellcome Trust

Contact: Jen Middleton
j.middleton@wellcome.ac.uk
44-207-611-7262
Wellcome Trust

Public Release: 26-Sep-2012
GW receives record 5-year, $134 million grant to study type 2 diabetes medications
John Lachin, professor of biostatistics, epidemiology and statistics at the George Washington University, has been awarded a five-year, $134 million grant from the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to conduct a clinical trial examining the long-term effectiveness of several glucose-lowering medications for treatment of people with type 2 diabetes. The grant sets a record as the largest sum award GW has ever received.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Latarsha Gatlin
lgatlin@gwu.edu
202-994-5631
George Washington University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2012
PLOS Medicine
PLOS Medicine editors comment on progress of World Health Report 2012
In this month's editorial, the PLOS Medicine Editors comment on the World Health Organization's (WHO) latest World Health Report, originally planned for publication in 2012, and the outcomes of the journal's collaboration with WHO on the intended theme of "no health without research."

Contact: Sumrina Yousufzai
syousufzai@plos.org
415-568-3164
PLOS

Public Release: 25-Sep-2012
PLOS Medicine
Large donors are forcing the World Health Organization to reform
The current practice of large donors is forcing the World Health Organization and the World Bank to reflect on how to reform to remain more appealing to the wider set of stakeholders and interests at play, according to Devi Sridhar from the University of Oxford writing in this week's PLOS Medicine.

Contact: Sumrina Yousufzai
syousufzai@plos.org
415-568-3164
PLOS

Public Release: 24-Sep-2012
World Heart Federation says heart health starts earlier than you think
A new multi-national survey reveals the extent of misconceptions about when is the right time to start taking action to prevent cardiovascular disease. In a four-country survey sample of 4,000 adults, 49 percent answered age 30 years or older when asked at what age they believe people should start to take action about their heart health to prevent conditions such as heart disease and stroke.

Contact: Charanjit K. jagait
charanjit.jagait@worldheart.org
41-228-070-334
World Heart Federation

Public Release: 23-Sep-2012
International Congress for Tropical Medicine and Malaria
Brazil, FIOCRUZ and DNDi Latin America partner to fight neglected diseases
At the opening ceremony of the XVIII International Congress for Tropical Medicines and Malaria and the XLVIII Congress of the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine in Rio de Janeiro, the Ministry of Health of Brazil signed a Cooperation and Technical Assistance Agreement with the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative Latin America, uniting the three actors into a strategic partnership to collaborate on research and development for new therapies and diagnostics for neglected diseases.

Contact: Mariana Abdalla
mabdalla@dndi.org.br
55-218-108-2466
Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Public Release: 20-Sep-2012
$20 million gift launches new hub for global health at UCSF
The University of California, San Francisco has received a $20 million gift from philanthropist Chuck Feeney to build a new hub for Global Health Sciences at the UCSF Mission Bay campus. Feeney made the gift through The Atlantic Philanthropies, the foundation he created in 1982.

Contact: Kristen Bole
krisen.bole@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Sep-2012
Science
New strategies needed to combat disease in developing countries
So-called lifestyle diseases are gaining ground with epidemic speed in low-income countries. The traditional health focus in these countries has been to combat communicable diseases such as malaria, HIV and tuberculosis. However, research from the University of Copenhagen suggests that dividing campaigns into combating either non-communicable or communicable diseases is ineffective and expensive. A new article by Danish scientists published in the well-reputed journal Science provides an overview.

Contact: Professor Ib Bygbjerg
iby@sund.ku.dk
45-41-58-94-97
University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 20-Sep-2012
Sanofi and TB Alliance announce collaboration to accelerate new tuberculosis treatments
Sanofi and the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development announced today a new research collaboration agreement to accelerate the discovery and development of novel compounds against tuberculosis, a deadly infectious disease that resulted in almost 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2010. Under the agreement, Sanofi and TB Alliance will collaborate to further optimize and develop several novel compounds in Sanofi's library that have demonstrated activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB.

Contact: Derek Ambrosino
Derek.Ambrosino@tballiance.org
646-616-8639
TB Alliance

Public Release: 19-Sep-2012
Science Translational Medicine
BIDMC and Diagnostics For All create first low-cost, paper-based, point of care liver function test
A new postage stamp-sized, paper-based device could provide a simple and reliable way to monitor for liver damage at a cost of only pennies per test, say researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Diagnostics For All (DFA), a Cambridge, MA nonprofit dedicated to improving the health of people living in the developing world.
Department of Defence, National Institutes of Health, Gates Foundation

Contact: Kelly Lawman
klawman@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7305
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2012
Neuron
Autism symptoms could arise from unreliable neural responses
Diverse symptoms associated with autism could be explained by unreliable activity of neurons in the brain in response to basic, nonsocial sensory information, according to a study published by Cell Press on September 19th in the journal Neuron. The new findings suggest that autism is a disorder of general neural processing and could potentially provide an explanation for the origins of a range of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

Contact: Elisabeth (Lisa) Lyons
elyons@cell.com
617-386-2121
Cell Press

Showing releases 651-675 out of 890.

<< < 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>