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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 926-933 out of 933.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38

Public Release: 28-Nov-2012
Report finds Big Pharma is doing more for access to medicine in developing countries
The latest Access to Medicine Index, which ranks the top 20 pharmaceutical companies on their efforts to improve access to medicine in developing countries, finds that the industry is doing more than it was two years ago. Seventeen out of the 20 companies perform better than they did at the time of the last Index report in 2010.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, UK Department for International Development, and others

Contact: Suzanne Wolf
swolf@atmindex.org
31-235-339-187
Access to Medicine Foundation

Public Release: 27-Nov-2012
Vaccine
Measles vaccine given with a microneedle patch could boost immunization programs
Measles vaccine given with painless and easy-to-administer microneedle patches can immunize against measles at least as well as vaccine given with conventional hypodermic needles, according to research done by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Nov-2012
ACS Nano
New method for diagnosing malaria
Danish researchers have developed a new and sensitive method that makes it possible to diagnose malaria from a single drop of blood or saliva. The method might eventually be used in low-resource areas without the need for specially trained personnel, expensive equipment, clean water or electricity. With the development of this method, the researchers hope to go one step further in identifying and treating all patients suffering from malaria.

Contact: Birgitta R. Knudsen
brk@mb.au.dk
45-60-20-26-73
Aarhus University

Public Release: 27-Nov-2012
Evolution, Medicine and Public Health
Malaria study suggests drugs should target female parasites
Fresh insight into the parasite that causes malaria suggests a new way to develop drugs and vaccines to tackle the disease.
Wellcome Trust

Contact: Eleanor Cowie
eleanor.cowie@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Glasgow

Public Release: 22-Nov-2012
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
'Repurposed' anti-parasite drug shows promise as new TB treatment: UBC research
A well-established family of drugs used to treat parasitic diseases is showing surprising potential as a therapy for tuberculosis, according to new research from University of British Columbia microbiologists. The findings, published online this week in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, are based on in vitro tests of the avermectin family of drugs. Discovered nearly 40 years ago, the drugs are commonly used in the developing world to eliminate the parasitic worms that cause river blindness and elephantiasis.
Canadian Institute of Health Research, British Columbia Lung Association, Grand Challenges Canada

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 22-Nov-2012
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
'Repurposed' anti-parasite drug shows promise as new TB treatment: UBC research
A well-established family of drugs used to treat parasitic diseases is showing surprising potential as a therapy for tuberculosis, according to new research from University of British Columbia microbiologists.

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 22-Nov-2012
Science
Study reveals the proteins expressed by human cytomegalovirus
New findings reveal the surprisingly complex protein-coding capacity of the human cytomegalovirus and provide the first steps toward understanding how the virus manipulates human cells during infection. The related study appears in the Nov. 23 issue of the journal Science, which is published by AAAS, the nonprofit science society.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Nov-2012
Inspired: Canada funds 68 bold, inventive ways to improve health, save lives in developing countries
Some 51 innovators in 18 low and middle income countries and 17 in Canada will share $7 million in Canadian grants to pursue bold, creative ideas for tackling health problems in resource-poor parts of the world. The projects will be implemented worldwide: 38 in Africa, 23 in Asia, five in Latin America/Caribbean, and two in the Middle East
Grand Challenges Canada

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
Sandra Rotman Centre for Global Health

Showing releases 926-933 out of 933.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38