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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1716.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal E
Ion adsorption matter in biology
Biological membranes are mainly composed of lipid bilayers. Gaining a better understanding of adsorption of solution ions onto lipid membranes helps clarify functional processes in biological cells. A new study, published in EPJ E, provides a quantitative description of the equilibria between lipid membranes and surrounding solution ions. In addition to shedding some light on biological processes, these results could also have implications for, among other things, the future development of medical diagnostics.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing
What does it take to fabricate electronic and medical devices tinier than a fraction of a human hair? Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego recently invented a new method of lithography in which nanoscale robots swim over the surface of light-sensitive material to create complex surface patterns that form the sensors and electronics components on nanoscale devices. Their research was published recently in the journal Nature Communications.

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard
Empa toxicologist Harald Krug has lambasted his colleagues in the journal Angewandte Chemie. He evaluated several thousand studies on the risks associated with nanoparticles and discovered no end of shortcomings: poorly prepared experiments and results that don't carry any clout. Instead of merely leveling criticism, however, Empa is also developing new standards for such experiments within an international network.
German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, CCMX Initiative, Swiss Federal Office for Environment, Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, German VCI

Contact: Harald F. Krug
harald.krug@empa.ch
41-587-657-248
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers
CU Denver study says upgrading infrastructure could reduce flood damage
The severe flooding that devastated a wide swath of Colorado last year might have been less destructive if the bridges, roads and other infrastructure had been upgraded or modernized, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Denver.

Contact: David Kelly
david.kelly@ucdenver.edu
303-315-6374
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists' simple solution for quantum technology challenge
A solution to one of the key challenges in the development of quantum technologies has been proposed by University of Sussex physicists.

Contact: Jacqui Bealing
press@sussex.ac.uk
University of Sussex

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Science
Watching the hidden life of materials
Researchers at McGill University have succeeded in simultaneously observing the reorganizations of atomic positions and electron distribution during the transformation of the 'smart material' vanadium dioxide from a semiconductor into a metal -- in a timeframe a trillion times faster than the blink of an eye. This marks the first time experiments have been able to distinguish changes in a material's atomic-lattice structure from the relocation of the electrons in such a blazingly fast process.
Canada Foundation for Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Research Chairs program, Fonds du Recherche du Québec-Nature et Technologies

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Analytical Methods
Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot
New device screens for kidney disease, prostate cancer on the spot. The tiny tube is lined with DNA sequences that latch onto disease markers in urine. While healthy samples flow freely, a diseased sample gets clogged and stops short of the mark.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joe Hadfield
joe_hadfield@byu.edu
801-422-9206
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Biosensors and Bioelectronics
New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring
In less than a minute, a miniature device developed at the University of Montreal can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug. Just as accurate and ten times less expensive than equipment currently used in hospitals.
National Science and Engineering Research Council, Centre for self-assembled chemical structures, Fonds québécois de recherche – Nature et technologies, Institut Mérieux

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
RIT student wins coveted SMART Scholarship from Department of Defense
Kyle Crompton, a doctoral student at the Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a prestigious SMART scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense. SMART -- the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation 'Scholarship for Service' Program -- awards scholarships to students pursuing advanced degrees in STEM fields. Upon graduation these scholars are hired as research staff at defense laboratories around the country to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers in this capacity.

Contact: Michelle Cometa
macuns@rit.edu
585-475-4954
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
New experiment provides route to macroscopic high-mass superpositions
University of Southampton scientists have designed a new experiment to test the foundations of quantum mechanics at the large scale.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Tackling blindness, deafness through neuroengineering
The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects. This is a further strengthening of the partnership between Harvard and Swiss scientists begun in 2010.
The Bertarelli Foundation

Contact: David J Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nanoparticle technology triples the production of biogas
Researchers of the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, a Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence, and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have developed the new BiogàsPlus, a technology which allows increasing the production of biogas by 200 percent with a controlled introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles to the process of organic waste treatment.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling with molecules
An international team of scientists have become the first ever researchers to successfully reach temperatures below minus 272.15 degrees Celsius -- only just above absolute zero -- using magnetic molecules. The physicists and chemists are presenting their new investigation on Oct. 22, 2014, in the scientific journal Nature Communications. It was developed by six scientists from Bielefeld University, the University of Manchester, and the Universidad de Zaragoza.

Contact: Dr. Jürgen Schnack
jschnack@uni-bielefeld.de
49-521-106-619-36901
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nano Letters
Sopping up proteins with thermosponges
A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed and tested a novel nanoparticle platform that efficiently delivers clinically important proteins in vivo in initial proof-of-concept tests.
Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, David Koch-Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Nicole Davis
nmdavisphd@gmail.com
617-823-3468
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Producing solar power with impure silicon
Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have developed a new method of producing solar cells could reduce the amount of silicon per unit area by 90 percent compared to the current standard. With the high prices of pure silicon, this will help cut the cost of solar power.
Research Council of Norway, NorFab, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Discovery Program

Contact: Ursula Gibson
ursula.gibson@ntnu.no
47-735-93336
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Interface
New feather findings get scientists in a flap
Scientists from the University of Southampton have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fiber, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UT Arlington researcher's device could detect vapors in environment or a person's breath
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes
University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.
National Science Foundation, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Could I squeeze by you?
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Science
Queen's in international 'attosecond' science breakthrough
Scientists from Queen's University Belfast have been involved in a groundbreaking discovery in the area of experimental physics that has implications for understanding how radiotherapy kills cancer cells, among other things.

Contact: Una Bradley
u.bradley@qub.ac.uk
44-289-097-5320
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.
National Institutes of Health, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Mirowski Family Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Springer and Tsinghua University Press award Nano Research Award
Professor Charles M. Lieber -- the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University -- has been presented with the first-ever Tsinghua University Press-Springer Nano Research Award.

Contact: Alexander K. Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1716.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>