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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1718.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
RIT student wins coveted SMART Scholarship from Department of Defense
Kyle Crompton, a doctoral student at the Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a prestigious SMART scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense. SMART -- the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation 'Scholarship for Service' Program -- awards scholarships to students pursuing advanced degrees in STEM fields. Upon graduation these scholars are hired as research staff at defense laboratories around the country to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers in this capacity.

Contact: Michelle Cometa
macuns@rit.edu
585-475-4954
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
New experiment provides route to macroscopic high-mass superpositions
University of Southampton scientists have designed a new experiment to test the foundations of quantum mechanics at the large scale.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Tackling blindness, deafness through neuroengineering
The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects. This is a further strengthening of the partnership between Harvard and Swiss scientists begun in 2010.
The Bertarelli Foundation

Contact: David J Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nanoparticle technology triples the production of biogas
Researchers of the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, a Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence, and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have developed the new BiogàsPlus, a technology which allows increasing the production of biogas by 200 percent with a controlled introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles to the process of organic waste treatment.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling with molecules
An international team of scientists have become the first ever researchers to successfully reach temperatures below minus 272.15 degrees Celsius -- only just above absolute zero -- using magnetic molecules. The physicists and chemists are presenting their new investigation on Oct. 22, 2014, in the scientific journal Nature Communications. It was developed by six scientists from Bielefeld University, the University of Manchester, and the Universidad de Zaragoza.

Contact: Dr. Jürgen Schnack
jschnack@uni-bielefeld.de
49-521-106-619-36901
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nano Letters
Sopping up proteins with thermosponges
A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed and tested a novel nanoparticle platform that efficiently delivers clinically important proteins in vivo in initial proof-of-concept tests.
Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, David Koch-Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Nicole Davis
nmdavisphd@gmail.com
617-823-3468
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Producing solar power with impure silicon
Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have developed a new method of producing solar cells could reduce the amount of silicon per unit area by 90 percent compared to the current standard. With the high prices of pure silicon, this will help cut the cost of solar power.
Research Council of Norway, NorFab, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Discovery Program

Contact: Ursula Gibson
ursula.gibson@ntnu.no
47-735-93336
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Interface
New feather findings get scientists in a flap
Scientists from the University of Southampton have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fiber, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UT Arlington researcher's device could detect vapors in environment or a person's breath
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes
University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.
National Science Foundation, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Could I squeeze by you?
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Science
Queen's in international 'attosecond' science breakthrough
Scientists from Queen's University Belfast have been involved in a groundbreaking discovery in the area of experimental physics that has implications for understanding how radiotherapy kills cancer cells, among other things.

Contact: Una Bradley
u.bradley@qub.ac.uk
44-289-097-5320
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.
National Institutes of Health, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Mirowski Family Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Springer and Tsinghua University Press award Nano Research Award
Professor Charles M. Lieber -- the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University -- has been presented with the first-ever Tsinghua University Press-Springer Nano Research Award.

Contact: Alexander K. Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D., elected to Institute of Medicine
Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner Department of Surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine.

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section A
Towards controlled dislocations
Klie and co-workers have used atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to explore dislocations in the binary II-VI semiconductor CdTe, commercially used in thin-film photovoltaics. The results may lead to eventual improvement in the conversion efficiency of CdTe solar cells. These novel insights into atomically resolved chemical structure of dislocations have potential for understanding many more defect-based phenomena.
US Department of Energy Sunshot Program

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Science
Winning by losing
The more energy you put in, the more light you get out -- this general rule does not apply to the coupled laser systems studied at the Vienna University of Technology and Washington University in St. Louis. Increasing the energy can switch the laser off, reducing its energy may switch it on. Paradoxical laser coupling effects could be used for opto-electronics or opto-mechanics.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Photonics
Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
Physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam, bright around the edges and dark in its center. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam, 100 times larger than previous.

Contact: Dr. Cyril Hnatovsky
cyril.hnatovsky@anu.edu.au
61-420-526-032
Australian National University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Physics
1980s American aircraft helps quantum technology take flight
The X-29, an American experimental aircraft has inspired University of Sydney quantum computing researchers in a development which will bring the technology out of the lab.
US Army Research Office, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-293-514-312
University of Sydney

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
UMass Amherst physicists working with Derek Lovley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive man-made material.
Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Chemistry
Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream
For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. The team built 32 DNA crystals with precisely-defined depth and an assortment of sophisticated three-dimensional features, an advance reported in Nature Chemistry.
Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Nano Letters
Superconducting circuits, simplified
New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips.
National Science Foundation, Director of National Intelligence

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1718.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>