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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1881.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
System may help treat rare genetic disorder, reduce severe side effects
Researchers have discovered a type of drug delivery system that may offer new hope for patients with a rare, ultimately fatal genetic disorder -- and make what might become a terrible choice a little easier.
Oregon State University/College of Pharmacy

Contact: Gaurav Sahay
sahay@ohsu.edu
503-346-4698
Oregon State University

Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Swarm Intelligence
Researchers discover machines can learn by simply observing
It is now possible for machines to learn how natural or artificial systems work by simply observing them, without being told what to look for, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield.

Contact: Kirsty Bowen
kirsty.bowen@sheffield.ac.uk
44-011-422-21034
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter
Meteorite impact on a nano scale
Trenches, craters and hillocks: shapes and structures which are observed after meteorite impacts can also be found on a nanoscale, when crystals are bombarded with heavy ions. Understanding the physics of those nano-impacts helps scientists to create new nanostructures and to understand problems with electronics under extreme conditions -- for instance computer chips in space.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Irish researchers join international team to make a breakthrough in fundamental physics
An international team of researchers have for the first time, discovered that in a very high magnetic field an electron with no mass can acquire a mass. Understanding why elementary particles, e.g. electrons, photons, neutrinos have a mass is a fundamental question in Physics and an area of intense debate. This discovery by Professor Stefano Sanvito, Trinity College Dublin and collaborators in Shanghai was published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications this month.

Contact: Mary Colclough
mary.colclough@tcd.ie
353-189-63022
AMBER Centre

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Nature Methods
A new window to understanding the brain
A team of researchers has demonstrated that syringe-injectable mesh electronics can stably record neural activity in mice for eight months or more, with none of the inflammation produced by traditional implanted probes.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science Advances
Crystal unclear: Why might this uncanny crystal change laser design?
New research suggests that the relatively large crystals used to change several properties of light in lasers -- changes that are crucial for making lasers into practical tools -- might be created by stacking up far smaller, rod-shaped microcrystals that can be grown easily and cheaply.

Contact: Chad Boutin
boutin@nist.gov
301-975-4261
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Current Organic Chemistry
Nanocatalysis for organic chemistry
Nanocatalysis has attracted much attention in the past few years. Functionalized materials with a nano-/submicro-dimension display a significant and dramatically powerful catalytic capability than traditional catalysts in organic chemical reactions due to the increased surface area which they provide and multiple catalytic centers in their structures.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Electrons at the speed limit
Electronic components have become faster and faster over the years, thus making powerful computers and other technologies possible. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now investigated how fast electrons can ultimately be controlled with electric fields. Their insights are of importance for the petahertz electronics of the future.
National Center of Competence in Research Molecular Ultrafast Science and Technology, Swiss National Science Foundation, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Contact: Dr. Ursula Keller
keller@phys.ethz.ch
41-446-332-146
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Chemistry of Materials
Important advance made with new approach to 'control' cancer, not eliminate it
Researchers have created a new drug delivery system that could improve the effectiveness of an emerging concept in cancer treatment -- to dramatically slow and control tumors on a long-term, sustained basis, not necessarily aiming for their complete elimination.
Medical Research Foundation of Oregon

Contact: Adam Alani
adam.alani@oregonstate.edu
503-346-4702
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
ACS Nano
Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins
Protein engineering techniques might one day lead to colorful ultrasound images of cells deep within our bodies.

Contact: Whitney Clavin
wclavin@caltech.edu
626-395-1856
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
A nanoscale wireless communication system via plasmonic antennas
A nanoscale wireless communication system developed by researchers at Boston College uses plasmonic antennas to produce greater control and increased efficiency to an approach eyed for next-generation 'on-chip' communications technologies.
W. M. Keck Foundation

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Forces of nature: Interview with microscopy innovators Gerd Binnig and Christoph Gerber
The inventors of one of the most versatile tools in modern science -- the atomic force microscope, or AFM -- tell their story in an interview published online this week. The AFM was invented in the mid 1980s by Gerd Binnig, Christoph Gerber and Calvin Quate, three physicists who are sharing the 2016 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience.

Contact: Jim Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
805-278-7495
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
A promising route to the scalable production of highly crystalline graphene films
Researchers discovered a procedure to restore defective graphene oxide structures that cause the material to display low carrier mobility. By applying a high-temperature reduction treatment in an ethanol environment, defective structures were restored, leading to the formation of a highly crystalline graphene film with excellent band-like transport. These findings are expected to come into use in scalable production techniques of highly crystalline graphene films.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Saori Obayashi
saori_obayashi@mail.osaka-u.ac.jp
81-661-055-886
Osaka University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Graphene under pressure
Small balloons made from one-atom-thick material graphene can withstand enormous pressures, much higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean, scientists at the University of Manchester report.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
ACS Central Science
New electrical energy storage material shows its power
A new material developed by Northwestern University chemist William Dichtel and his team could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. The modified covalent organic framework (COF) material combines the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy or charge, like a battery, and the ability to charge and discharge rapidly, like a supercapacitor, into one device. The researchers built a prototype device capable of powering an LED for 30 seconds.
National Science Foundation, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
50 years after the release of the film 'Fantastic Voyage,' science upstages fiction
Fifty years to the day after the film 'Fantastic Voyage' was first shown in theaters, the Polytechnique Montréal Nanorobotics Laboratory is unveiling a unique medical interventional infrastructure devoted to the fight against cancer. The outcome of 15 years of research conducted by Professor Sylvain Martel and his team, it enables microscopic nanorobotic agents to be guided through the vascular systems of living bodies, delivering drugs to targeted areas.

Contact: Annie Touchette
annie.touchette@polymtl.ca
514-231-8133
Polytechnique Montréal

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Bio-inspired tire design: Where the rubber meets the road
Anand Jagota, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and director of Lehigh's bioengineering program, and his team recently published a paper in Scientific Reports outlining their work creating new bio-inspired film-terminated structures with unique friction characteristics that could have positive industrial implications for, among other things, tires. The paper was co-written by Jagota and lead author Zhenping He along with Ying Bai, Chung-Yuen Hui of Cornell University and Benjamin Levrard, a researcher at Michelin Corporation.
Michelin® International Corporation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Journal of the Electrochemical Society
Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
Doctoral student Charles McLaren and Professor Himanshu Jain from Lehigh University -- along with colleagues at the University of Marburg in Germany -- have published new findings in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Electrochemical Society about the process involving transformations in glass that occur under intense electrical and thermal conditions. New understanding of these mechanisms could lead the way to more energy-efficient glass manufacturing, and even glass supercapacitors that leapfrog the performance of batteries now used for electric cars and solar energy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
ACS Photonics
Silicon nanoparticles trained to juggle light
Silicon nanoparticles based devices would allow to transmit, reflect, or scatter incident light in a specified direction, depending on its intensity. They could be integrated into microchips that would enable ultrafast all-optical signal processing in optical communication lines and the next generation optical computers.

Contact: Asya Shepunova
shepunova@phystech.edu
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
ACS Synthetic Biology
Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube
Duke University researchers have created strands of synthetic DNA that, when mixed together in a test tube in the right concentrations, form an analog circuit that can add, subtract and multiply as the molecules form and break bonds. While most DNA circuits are digital, their device performs calculations in an analog fashion by measuring the varying concentrations of specific DNA molecules directly, without requiring special circuitry to convert them to zeroes and ones first.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in the behavior of stem and cancer cells
A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. Novel scaffolds are shown enabling cells to behave in a different but controlled way in vitro due to the presence of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of an ultra-high anisotropy ratio augmented into graphene shells.

Contact: Michael Gasik
michael.gasik@aalto.fi
358-505-609-511
Aalto University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Chemistry 2.0: KIT participates in INERATEC spinoff
Apart from teaching and research, innovation is one of the three core tasks of KIT. Consequently, technology transfer from fundamental research to trendsetting products is supported with adequate tools. Now, KIT has decided to participate as a partner in INERATEC GmbH. KIT will invest in this innovative spinoff that may revolutionize chemical process engineering and contribute to the success of the energiewende in the area of chemical energy storage systems.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
Nanofur for oil spill cleanup
Some water ferns can absorb large volumes of oil within a short time, because their leaves are strongly water-repellent and, at the same time, highly oil-absorbing. Researchers of KIT, together with colleagues of Bonn University, have found that the oil-binding capacity of the water plant results from the hairy microstructure of its leaves. It is now used as a model to further develop the new Nanofur material for the environmentally friendly cleanup of oil spills.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-604-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Nature Chemistry
LiH mediates low-temperature ammonia synthesis
The Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics research group led by Professor Chen Ping demonstrates, for the first time, that the scaling relations on catalytic NH3 synthesis can be 'broken.' Thus, NH3 synthesis under mild reaction conditions can be achieved at an unprecedentedly high rate over a new set of catalysts.

Contact: Lu Xinyi
luxinyi@dicp.ac.cn
86-411-843-79201
Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Stretchy supercapacitors power wearable electronics
A future of soft robots or smart T-shirts may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid -- not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1881.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>