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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1665.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lan Yang, Ph.D., the Das Family Career Development Associate Professor in Electrical & Systems Engineering, and their collaborators at Tsinghua University in China have developed a new sensor that can detect and count nanoparticles, at sizes as small as 10 nanometers, one at a time. The researchers say the sensor could potentially detect much smaller particles, viruses and small molecules.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Julie Flory
Julie.Flory@WUSTL.EDU
314-935-5408
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology
One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the world have made all sorts of attempts to achieve this, but now scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute have succeeded in creating a steady stream of photons emitted one at a time and in a particular direction.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-28-75-06-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
Copper shines as flexible conductor
By turning instead to copper, both abundant and cheap, researchers at Monash University and the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication have developed a way of making flexible conductors cost-effective enough for commercial application.

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
A new, tunable device for spintronics
Recently, the research group of Professor Jairo Sinova from the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in collaboration with researchers from the UK, Prague, and Japan, has for the first time realised a new, efficient spin-charge converter based on the common semiconductor material GaAs. These results have recently been published in the journal Nature Materials.

Contact: Jairo Sinova
sinova@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-21284
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits
A new research platform uses a laser to measure the 'nanomechanical' properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Lab on a Chip
Nanoscale assembly line
ETH researchers have realized a long-held dream: inspired by an industrial assembly line, they have developed a nanoscale production line for the assembly of biological molecules.

Contact: Viola Vogel
viola.vogel@hest.ethz.ch
41-446-320-887
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Novel 'butterfly' molecule could build new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices
Exciting new work by a Florida State University research team has led to a novel molecular system that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time
One of nature's mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun's rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant's blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes. Researchers at DTU Physics have now managed to successfully 'film' this process.

Contact: Tim Brandt van Driel
tidr@fysik.dtu.dk
45-45-25-31-82
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. The collaboration between the Institute of Basic Science/Seoul National University and National Cancer Center Singapore represents an auspicious therapeutic approach about HCC.
Institute for Basic Science, SingHealth Foundation, National Medical Research Council, Biomedical Research Council of Singapore, Millennium Foundation

Contact: Han Bin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Scientists craft atomically seamless, thinnest-possible semiconductor junctions
The University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that two single-layer semiconductor materials can be connected in an atomically seamless fashion known as a heterojunction. This result could be the basis for next-generation flexible and transparent computing, better light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, and solar technologies.
US Department of Energy, UW/Clean Energy Institute, Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, University Grants Committee of Hong Kong, Croucher Foundation, Science City Research Alliance, Higher Education Funding Council for England

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Competition for graphene
Berkeley Lab reports the first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Scientific Reports
Symphony of nanoplasmonic and optical resonators produces laser-like light emission
By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a-chip applications.

Contact: Gary Eden
jgeden@illinois.edu
217-333-4157
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Unmanned Systems
ZigBee in the Sky
Engineers at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have successfully piloted the world's first ZigBee-based inter-satellite communication system.

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 22-Aug-2014
5 UC Riverside scientists among world's most influential scientific minds
Thomson Reuters, a leading source of information for businesses and professionals, has included five researchers at the University of California, Riverside in its 2014 list of some of the best and brightest minds of our times. To generate the list, the company analyzed citation data over 11 years (2002-2012) to identify researchers whose published work has had enormous impact. The researchers are: Roya Bahreini, Julia Bailey-Serres, Robert Haddon, Wei Ren and Yadong Yin.
Thomson Reuters

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Aug-2014
Science
A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy
Nanometer-scale gold particles are intensively investigated for application as catalysts, sensors, drug delivery devices, biological contrast agents and components in photonics and molecular electronics.
University of Jyväskylä

Contact: Hannu Häkkinen
hannu.hakkinen@jyu.fi
Academy of Finland

Public Release: 22-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Stanford scientists develop a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery
Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most fuel cell vehicle run on hydrogen made from natural gas. Now Stanford scientists have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron.
Precourt Institute for Energy and Global Climate & Energy Project, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Shaping the future of nanocrystals
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes in solution, pointing the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and revealing that a nearly 150-year-old scientific law describing crystal growth breaks down at the nanoscale.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal D
Water window imaging opportunity
Ever heard of the water window? It consists of radiations in the 3.3 to 4.4 nanometer range, which are not absorbed by the water in biological tissues. A new theoretical study identifies the physical mechanism needed to efficiently generate harmonic radiations at high laser intensities that occur beyond the saturation threshold of atoms and molecules. These findings, aimed at improving conventional methods of coherent radiation production to reach the water window, were published in EPJ D.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Scientists observe quantum vortices in cold helium droplets
An international research team including DESY scientists has observed tiny quantum vortices in cold droplets of liquid helium. It is the first time that the quantum vortices, which have been observed in larger samples of superfluid helium before, have been detected in nanodroplets, as the team reports in the journal Science. 'The experiment has exceeded our best expectations,' says Andrey Vilesov of the University of Southern California, one of the experiment's three leads.

Contact: Thomas Zoufal
presse@desy.de
49-408-998-1666
Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics
Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel
An Australian National University team has successfully replicated one of the crucial steps in photosynthesis, opening the way for biological systems powered by sunlight which could manufacture hydrogen as a fuel.

Contact: Dr. Kastoori Hingorani
kastoori.hingorani@anu.edu.au
61-415-575-278
Australian National University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature Photonics
Seeing a molecule breathe
For the first time, chemists have succeeded in measuring vibrational motion of a single molecule with a femtosecond time resolution. The study reveals how vibration of a single molecule differs from the behavior of larger molecular groups.
The Academy of Finland

Contact: Eero Hulkko
eero.j.hulkko@jyu.fi
358-458-916-796
Academy of Finland

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
MIPT and RAS scientists made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots
Researchers at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Russian Academy of Sciences made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots discovering a way of enabling them to produce logical calculations using a variety of biochemical reactions.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-926-376-1175
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Training the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists
Northeastern University has received a five-year, $1.15 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to train the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists and clinicians through a unique experiential learning program.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Science
Artificial cells act like the real thing
Weizmann Institute scientists have created an artificial, network-like cell system that is capable of reproducing the dynamic behavior of protein synthesis. This achievement is not only likely to help gain a deeper understanding of basic biological processes, but it may, in the future, pave the way toward controlling the synthesis of both naturally-occurring and synthetic proteins for a host of uses.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1665.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>