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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1712.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
NRL scientists discover novel metamaterial properties within hexagonal boron nitride
Researchers have demonstrated that confined surface phonon polaritons within hexagonal boron nitride exhibit unique metamaterial properties that enable novel nanoscale optical devices.

Contact: Daniel Parry
daniel.parry@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Universities of Mainz and Nagoya finalize exchange program for students, researchers in physics
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and Nagoya University finalize exchange program for students and researchers in physics

Contact: Klaus Wendt
klaus.wendt@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-22882
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Optica
A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays
University of Utah engineers have developed a polarizing filter that allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Utah Science Technology and Research Economic Development Initiative

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Small
NTU Singapore develops novel 2-in-1 biomarker and drug delivery system
Nanyang Technological University has invented a unique biomarker with two exceptional functions.

Contact: Lester Kok
lesterkok@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Thin film produces new chemistry in 'nanoreactor'
Physicists at the University of Groningen led by Professor of Functional Nanomaterials Beatriz Noheda have discovered a new manganese compound that is produced by tension in the crystal structure of terbium manganese oxide. The technique they used to create this new material could open the way to new nanoscale circuits. Their findings were published on Nov. 20, 2014 in the journal Nature.
NanoNextNl, FOM Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter.

Contact: Beatriz Noheda
b.noheda@rug.nl
31-503-634-440
University of Groningen

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Chemistry
UCLA biochemists build largest synthetic molecular 'cage' ever
University of California Los Angeles biochemists have created the largest protein ever that self-assembles into a molecular cage. Their designed protein, which does not exist in nature, is hundreds of times smaller than a human cell. The research could lead to 'synthetic vaccines' that protect people from the flu, HIV and perhaps other diseases. It could also lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells and the creation of new nano-scale materials.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Two sensors in one
MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
University of Houston researcher honored for work in nanomaterials
Debora Rodrigues, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Houston, has received the Emerging Investigator award from the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization. Rodrigues has worked with nanomaterials since arriving at UH in 2010, using the technology to develop new methods for water purification and treatment. In addition to her research, she was recognized for her work with students and her outreach to other educators.
Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Clean energy 'bio batteries' a step closer
University of East Anglia researchers are a step closer to enhancing the generation of clean energy from bacteria. Research shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulating areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of electrically conductive 'stepping stones.' This natural process could be used to improve 'bio batteries' for portable technology such as mobile phones and laptops powered by human or animal waste.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Better micro-actuators to transport materials in liquids
Researchers have developed improved forms of tiny magnetic actuators thanks to new materials and a microscopic 3-D printing technology.

Contact: Press Office
mediarelations@hk.ethz.ch
41-446-324-141
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Thomas Gaborski named 2014 Young Innovator by international Biomedical Engineering Society
Thomas Gaborski, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology, and his research team are developing ways to use ultra-thin nano-membranes and adipose stem cells to create the vascular network necessary in engineering tissue, skin and organs. For his work with thin membranes and cell culture on membranes, Gaborski received the 2014 Young Innovator Award in Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering given by the Biomedical Engineering Society.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michelle Cometa
macuns@rit.edu
585-475-4954
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Graphene/nanotube hybrid benefits flexible solar cells
Rice University scientists create a graphene/nanotube cathode that may make cheap, flexible dye-sensitized solar cells more practical.
Welch Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin LANCER IV program, Sandia National Laboratory, Office of Naval Research MURI

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Penn engineers efficiently 'mix' light at the nanoscale
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have engineered a nanowire system that could pave the way for photonic computing, combining two light waves to produce a third with a different frequency and using an optical cavity to amplify the intensity of the output to a usable level.
US Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions
Lawrence Livermore develops method to measure residual stress in 3-D printed metal parts
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed an efficient method to measure residual stress in metal parts produced by powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Biomicrofluidics
New advance in cryopreservation could change management of world blood supplies
Engineers have identified a method to rapidly prepare frozen red blood cells for transfusions, which may offer an important new way to manage the world's blood supply.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Adam Higgins
adam.higgins@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4600
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Scientific Reports
Advances in electron microscopy reveal secrets of HIV and other viruses
UC Davis researchers are getting a new look at the workings of HIV and other viruses thanks to new techniques in electron microscopy developed on campus.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Jennifer Lewis named 2014 Global Thinker by Foreign Policy magazine
Wyss Institute Core Faculty Member Jennifer Lewis, Sc.D., has been selected as one of Foreign Policy's 100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2014 for her disruptive research in 3D bioprinting. Honorees were selected internationally for their efforts to impact the world through transformative ideas and actions.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpie@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood
Northwestern University scientists have demonstrated the first genetic-based approach that is able to detect live circulating tumor cells out of the complex matrix that is human blood -- no easy feat. The NanoFlare technology potentially could detect cancer cells long before they could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor. In a breast cancer study, the NanoFlares easily entered cells and lit up the cell if a biomarker target was present, even if only a trace amount.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers discern the shapes of high-order Brownian motions
For the first time, scientists have vividly mapped the shapes and textures of high-order modes of Brownian motions -- in this case, the collective macroscopic movement of molecules in microdisk resonators. Case Western Reserve University engineers used a record-setting scanning optical interferometry technique.

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
Spiral laser beam creates quantum whirlpool
Physicists have engineered a spiral laser beam and used it to create a whirlpool of hybrid light-matter particles called polaritons, hybrid particles that have properties of both matter and light and could link electronics with photonics.

Contact: Dr. Elena Ostrovskaya
elena.ostrovskaya@anu.edu.au
61-261-253-798
Australian National University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
New form of crystalline order holds promise for thermoelectric applications
A team of researchers from Vanderbilt University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports that it has discovered an entirely new form of crystalline order that simultaneously exhibits both crystal and polycrystalline properties and holds promise for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices.
National Science Foundation, United States Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Nature Physics
'Topological insulators' promising for spintronics, quantum computers
Researches have uncovered 'smoking-gun' evidence to confirm the workings of an emerging class of materials that could make possible 'spintronic' devices and practical quantum computers far more powerful than today's technologies.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, US Army Research Office, Welch Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
Bio-inspired bleeding control
Stanching the free flow of blood from an injury remains a holy grail of clinical medicine. Controlling blood flow is a primary concern and first line of defense for patients and medical staff in many situations, from traumatic injury to illness to surgery. If control is not established within the first few minutes of a hemorrhage, further treatment and healing are impossible.

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
New process isolates promising material
Northwestern University's Mark Hersam is working to isolate atomically thin layers of molybdenum disulfide, a material with applications in electronics, optoelectronics, solar cells, and catalysis.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1712.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>