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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1721.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Nanoscale
Southampton scientists grow a new challenger to graphene
A team of researchers from the University of Southampton's Optoelectronics Research Centre has developed a new way to fabricate a potential challenger to graphene.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Cell Reports
Massachusetts General study reveals gene expression patterns in pancreatic CTCs
Analysis of circulating tumor cells in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of CTCs, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to the ability to generate metastases. The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center investigators identified several different classes of pancreatic CTCs and found unexpected factors that may prove to be targets for improved treatment of the deadly tumor.
Stand Up to Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Affymetrix, Inc.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Journal of Controlled Release
New chip promising for tumor-targeting research
Researchers have developed a chip capable of simulating a tumor's 'microenvironment' and plan to use the new system to test the effectiveness of nanoparticles and drugs that target cancer.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene imperfections key to creating hypersensitive 'electronic nose'
Researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.
National Science Foundation, DOE/National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, NSF/Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
University of Minnesota electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. The discovery could have major implications for creating faster and more efficient optical devices for computation and communication.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Chemistry
New 'star' shaped molecule breakthrough
Scientists at The University of Manchester have generated a new star-shaped molecule made up of interlocking rings, which is the most complex of its kind ever created.

Contact: Aeron Haworth
aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk
44-717-788-1563
University of Manchester

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Materials
Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads
For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin 'diamond nanothreads' that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The threads have a structure that has never been seen before.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
Uncovering the forbidden side of molecules
Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have succeeded in observing the 'forbidden' infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time. These extremely weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology. The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.

Contact: Reto Caluori
reto.caluori@unibas.ch
41-612-672-495
University of Basel

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
2D Materials
Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
New research points to graphene as a flexible, low-cost touchscreen solution
New research published today in the journal Advanced Functional Materials suggests that graphene-treated nanowires could soon replace current touchscreen technology, significantly reducing production costs and allowing for more affordable, flexible displays.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
01-483-686-141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Toward optical chips
In the next issue of the journal Nano Letters, researchers from MIT's departments of Physics and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science will describe a new technique for building MoS2 light emitters tuned to different frequencies, an essential requirement for optoelectronic chips. Since thin films of material can also be patterned onto sheets of plastic, the same work could point toward thin, flexible, bright, color displays.

Contact: Kimberly Allen
allenkc@mit.edu
617-253-2702
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
SPIE Optics + Photonics
Proceedings of SPIE
Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies
Solutions required for progress on the frontiers of photonics technology are close at hand: in nature, when viewed through the perspective of engineer, says Montana State University optics researcher Joseph Shaw. Along with Rongguang Liang of the University of Arizona, Shaw chaired the 'Light in Nature' conference presenting new research in the field last month at SPIE Optics + Photonics and being published in the SPIE Digital Library.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Oxides discovered by CCNY team could advance memory devices
The quest for the ultimate memory device for computing may have just taken an encouraging step forward. Researchers at The City College of New York led by chemist Stephen O'Brien have discovered new complex oxides that exhibit both magnetic and ferroelectric properties.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
Nanoscience makes your wine better
One sip of a perfectly poured glass of wine leads to an explosion of flavours in your mouth. Researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, have now developed a nanosensor that can mimic what happens in your mouth when you drink wine. The sensor measures how you experience the sensation of dryness in the wine.

Contact: Associate Professor Duncan Sutherland, Aarhus University
duncan@inano.au.dk
45-23-38-57-89
Aarhus University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Using solar energy to turn raw materials into ingredients for every day life
QUT scientist Dr. Sarina Sarina, who achieved outstanding progress in driving this energy intensive chemical production process at ambient temperature using light instead of fossil fuels, has won the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt fellowship at the famous Max Planck Institute in Berlin.

Contact: Rose Trapnell
rose.trapnell@qut.edu.au
040-758-5901
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Applied Materials and Interfaces
Nanoribbon film keeps glass ice-free
Rice University scientists who created a deicing film for radar domes have now refined the technology to work as a transparent coating for glass.
The Lockheed Martin Aerospace Co., Office of Naval Research/Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature
Water-based nuclear battery developed by MU can be used to generate electrical energy
From cell phones to cars and flashlights, batteries play an important role in everyday life. Scientists and technology companies constantly are seeking ways to improve battery life and efficiency. Now, for the first time using a water-based solution, researchers at the University of Missouri have created a long-lasting and more efficient nuclear battery that could be used for many applications such as a reliable energy source in automobiles and also in complicated applications such as space flight.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
The future face of molecular electronics
The emerging field of molecular electronics could take our definition of portable to the next level, enabling the construction of tiny circuits from molecular components. In these highly efficient devices, individual molecules would take on the roles currently played by comparatively-bulky wires, resistors and transistors. A team of researchers has identified a potential candidate for use in small-scale electronics: a molecule called picene.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Smart Materials and Structures
'Smart material' chin strap harvests energy from chewing
A chin strap that can harvest energy from jaw movements has been created by a group of researchers in Canada.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Science
Cells simply avoid chromosome confusion
Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors. This natural safeguard prevents incorrect chromosome counts and misalignments that lead to infertility, miscarriage, or congenital conditions.
Wellcome Trust, National Institutes of Health, Packard Fellowship, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sidney Kimmel Foundation

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Grant to help commercialize silicon surgical blades
A UC Davis engineering professor has received a grant of $200,000 from the National Science Foundation 'Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research-Technology Translation' program to move his silicon-based blades towards commercial development as surgical and shaving tools.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Northeastern University researchers develop novel method for working with nanotubes
Northeastern University researchers have developed a novel method for controllably constructing precise inter-nanotube junctions and a variety of nanocarbon structures in carbon nanotube arrays. The researchers were able to tailor the physical properties of nanotube networks for use in applications from electronic devices to carbon nanotube-reinforced composite materials found in cars and sports equipment. The findings were published in a Nature Communications paper titled 'Sculpting carbon bonds for allotropic transformation through solid-state re-engineering of –sp2 carbon.'
National Science Foundation, The Republic of Korea Ministry of Industry

Contact: John O'Neill
j.oneill@neu.edu
617-373-5460
Northeastern University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers
Rice University scientists make 'neat' carbon nanotube fibers with an acid-free process.
Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Scientists mapped quantum phase transitions at temperatures colder than interstellar space. The ultra-cold conditions isolated the fluctuations that define the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials. The research provides new methods to identify and understand materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Medicine
Blood-cleansing biospleen device developed for sepsis therapy
Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in a patient's blood -- often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen and developed by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, DOD/Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, Harvard's Wyss Institute

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1721.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>