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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1794.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Robust new process forms 3-D shapes from flat sheets of graphene
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new approach for forming 3-D shapes from flat, 2-D sheets of graphene, paving the way for future integrated systems of graphene-MEMS hybrid devices and flexible electronics.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research/Asian Office of Aerospace Research Development Nano Bio Info Technology Phase III Program, American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association, and others

Contact: SungWoo Nam
swnam@illinois.edu
217-300-0267
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL
Nanometric sensor designed to detect herbicides can help diagnose multiple sclerosis
A nanobiosensor for the early diagnosis of certain types of cancer, as well as nervous system diseases such as multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica, was developed by researches in São Paulo State, Brazil. The nanometric sensor is capable of identifying biomarkers of these pathological conditions. An article about the nanobiosensor has just been published as a cover feature by IEEE Sensors Journal.
FAPESP - São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits
Toward tiny, solar-powered sensors
Last week, at the Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits, MIT researchers presented a new power converter chip that can harvest more than 80 percent of the energy trickling into it, even at the extremely low power levels characteristic of tiny solar cells. Previous experimental ultralow-power converters had efficiencies of only 40 or 50 percent.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Advanced Materials
'Pick and mix' smart materials for robotics
Researchers have successfully combined multiple functions into a single smart life-like material for the first time. These 'designer' materials could be used in the robotics, automotive, aerospace and security industries.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids
New technique developed by Brookhaven Lab scientists to rapidly create multi-layered, self-assembled grids could transform the manufacture of high-tech coatings for anti-reflective surfaces, improved solar cells, and touchscreen electronics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Nature Physics
With 300 kilometers per second to new electronics
It may be significantly easier to design electronic components in future. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids have discovered that the electrical resistance of a compound of niobium and phosphorus increases enormously when the material is exposed to a magnetic field. The Max Planck researchers, together with colleagues from the High-Field Magnet Laboratories at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and at the Radboud University in the Netherlands, published the new findings on niobium phosphide in the journal Nature Physics.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Soft core, hard shell -- the latest in nanotechnology
Medical science is placing high hopes on nanoparticles as in future they could be used, for example, as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. In collaboration with an international team of researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen have for the first time succeeded in assaying the stability of these particles and their distribution within the body. Their results, which have been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, show that a lot of research is still needed in this field.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, European Commission

Contact: Wolfgang G. Kreyling
kreyling@helmholtz-muenchen.de
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Superslippery islands (but then they get stuck)
It's possible to vary (even dramatically) the sliding properties of atoms on a surface by changing the size and 'compression' of their aggregates: an experimental and theoretical study conducted with the collaboration of SISSA, the Istituto Officina dei Materiali of the CNR (Iom-Cnr-Democritos), ICTP in Trieste, the University of Padua, the University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, and the Istituto Nanoscienze of the CNR (Nano-Cnr) in Modena, has just been published in Nature Nanotechnology.

Contact: Federica Sgorbissa
pressoffice@sissa.it
39-040-378-7644
International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Scientific Reports
Iowa State engineers develop micro-tentacles so tiny robots can handle delicate objects
Iowa State University's Jaeyoun Kim and his research group have developed microrobotic tentacles that can be the hands and fingers of small robots designed to safely handle delicate objects. The engineers describe their micro-tentacles in the journal Scientific Reports.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jaeyoun (Jay) Kim
plasmon@iastate.edu
515-294-4214
Iowa State University

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Engineer develops real-time listeria biosensor prototype
A Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer and a Florida colleague have developed a biosensor that can detect listeria bacterial contamination within two or three minutes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Burns
rd-burns@tamu.edu
903-312-3199
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Professor Andreas Peter Ruediger made an honorary Fellow of the MUAS
Professor Andreas Peter Ruediger of the Energy Materials Telecommunication Research Centre at INRS has been made an honorary Fellow of the Munich University of Applied Sciences. The university also awarded him a fellowship that will enable him to continue his teaching and research activities as a visiting professor in the Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics. He is one of four winners of fellowships offered by the university to international researchers in 2015-2016.
Munich University of Applied Sciences

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
First solar cell made of highly ordered molecular frameworks
Researchers at KIT have developed a material suited for photovoltaics. For the first time, a functioning organic solar cell consisting of a single component has been produced on the basis of metal-organic framework compounds. The material is highly elastic and might also be used for the flexible coating of clothes and deformable components. This development success is presented on the front page of the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
ICFO and Cambridge University Press announce the release of 'The Wonders of Light'
ICFO and Cambridge University Press publish a book dedicated to discovering the amazing powers of light. The launch of the book coincides with the celebration of the International Year of Light 2015 proclaimed by UNESCO.

Contact: Alina Hirschmann
alina.hirschmann@icfo.eu
34-935-542-246
ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
NNI publishes workshop report and launches web portal on nanosensors
The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office is pleased to announce the launch of a workshop report and a web portal, efforts coordinated through and in support of the Nanotechnology Signature Initiative 'Nanotechnology for Sensors and Sensors for Nanotechnology: Improving and Protecting Health, Safety, and the Environment' (Sensors NSI).
National Nanotechnology Initiative

Contact: Marlowe Newman
mnewman@nnco.nano.gov
703-292-7128
National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Small
Biomedical breakthrough: Carbon nanoparticles you can make at home
Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body's immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues. The new approach generates the particles in a few hours and uses only a handful of ingredients, including store-bought molasses.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Researchers design placenta-on-a-chip to better understand pregnancy
National Institutes of Health researchers and their colleagues have developed a 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy. The device was designed to imitate, on a micro-level, the structure and function of the placenta and model the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus. This prototype is one of the latest in a series of organ-on-a-chip technologies developed to accelerate biomedical advances.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital Research Fund, National Research Foundation of Korea, National Medical Center & Asan Medical Center in South Korea

Contact: Katie Rush
katie.rush@nih.gov
301-496-9066
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
Staying cool: Saharan silver ants
Researchers have discovered two strategies that enable Saharan silver ants to stay cool in one of the world's hottest environments. They are the first to demonstrate that the ants use a coat of uniquely shaped hairs to control electromagnetic waves over an extremely broad range from the solar spectrum to the thermal radiation spectrum and that different physical mechanisms are used in different spectral bands to realize the same biological function of reducing body temperature.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials
In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights, published in the June 19 issue of the journal Science, could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Fundamentals of materials modeling for metals processing technologies
World Scientific's latest book on 'Fundamentals of Materials Modelling for Metals Processing Technologies: Theories and Applications' comprehensively introduces the unique theory developed over years of research on materials and process modelling and its application in metal forming technologies.

Contact: Jason CJ
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new look at surface chemistry
A multi-institutional team of researchers, including scientists from Berkeley Lab have used a new scanning electron microscopy technique to resolve the unique atomic structure at the surface of a material. This new technique holds promise for the study of catalysis, corrosion and other critical chemical reactions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new way to image surfaces on the nanoscale
A multi-institutional team of scientists, including a Northwestern University professor of materials science and engineering, has taken an important step in understanding where atoms are located on the surfaces of rough materials, information that could be very useful in diverse commercial applications, such as developing green energy and understanding how materials rust. The team has developed a new imaging technique that uses atomic resolution secondary electron images in a quantitative way to determine the arrangement of atoms on the surface.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science, Material Science and Engineering Division

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Toward nanorobots that swim through blood to deliver drugs (video)
Someday, treating patients with nanorobots could become standard practice to deliver medicine specifically to parts of the body affected by disease. But merely injecting drug-loaded nanoparticles might not always be enough to get them where they need to go. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters the development of new nanoswimmers that can move easily through body fluids to their targets.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
New Materials From Trees
Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3-D
A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3-D bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material. The effect is that cellulose and other raw material based on wood will be able to compete with fossil-based plastics and metals in the ongoing additive manufacturing revolution, which started with the introduction of the 3-D printer.

Contact: Paul Gatenholm
paul.gatenholm@chalmers.se
46-707-535-750
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Nanoparticles can be intrinsically left- and right-handed
A team of scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College Dublin published first experimental results showing that ordinary nanocrystals possess intrinsic chirality and can be produced under normal conditions as a half-and-half mixture of mirror images of each other. The discovery of this fundamental property in nanocrystals opens new horizons in nano- and bio-technology and medicine, for instance, for such applications as targeted drug delivery. The results of the study were published in Nano Letters.

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
dvmalkov@corp.ifmo.ru
7-953-377-5508
ITMO University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Diamonds are for temperature
Luminescent signals from green glowing diamond defects could monitor temperature in a range of physical and biological systems with unprecedented versatility.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1794.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>