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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1698.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 10-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Pairing old technologies with new for next-generation electronic devices
University College London scientists have discovered a new method to efficiently generate and control currents based on the magnetic nature of electrons in semi-conducting materials, offering a radical way to develop a new generation of electronic devices.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Funai Foundation for Information Technology, European Research Council, Czech Grant Agency, Czech Academy of Sciences PraemiumAcademiae, Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation, JST

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Surface Review and Letters
Which structure has optimal resistive switching characteristics?
Researchers fabricated Pt/TiOx/ZnO/n+-Si structures and investigated the effects of TiOx interlayer with different thickness on the resistance switching of Pt/TiOx/ZnO/n+-Si structures.
Chinese National Natural Science Foundation Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Designing better materials for the 21st century
The US Defense Department recently named Jian Luo, professor of nanoengineering and materials science and engineering at the University of California, San Diego as one of 10 new National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellows. The award provides up to $3 million over five years to develop a new materials design tool called interfacial phase diagrams.
US Department of Defense

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Harry Atwater and Albert Polman receive the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics 2014
This year's Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics will be awarded to Dr. Harry A. Atwater and Dr. Albert Polman for their pioneering achievements in plasmonics and novel nanophotonic routes to ultrahigh-efficiency solar energy conversion. The award, accompanied by US$5,000, will be presented on Sept. 1 at the Muziekgebouw in Amsterdam during the Julius Springer Forum on Applied Physics 2014.

Contact: Renate Bayaz
renate.bayaz@springer.com
49-622-148-78531
Springer

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Nature
Synthesis of structurally pure carbon nanotubes using molecular seeds
For the first time, researchers at Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research have succeeded in 'growing' single-wall carbon nanotubes with a single predefined structure -- and hence with identical electronic properties. And here is how they pulled it off: the CNTs 'assembled themselves,' as it were, out of tailor-made organic precursor molecules on a platinum surface, as reported by the researchers in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

Contact: Martina Peter
redaktion@empa.ch
41-587-654-987
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
6th International Meeting on Origami in Science, Math and Education
Science
Learning from origami to design new materials
A challenge increasingly important to physicists and materials scientists in recent years has been how to design controllable new materials that exhibit desired physical properties rather than relying on those properties to emerge naturally, says University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Christian Santangelo. Now he and physicist Arthur Evans and polymer scientist Ryan Hayward at University Massachusetts Amherst, with others, are using origami-based folding methods for 'tuning' the fundamental physical properties of any type of thin sheet.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Sixth International Meeting on Origami in Science, Mathematics and Education
Science
Origami could lead to exotic materials, tiny transformers
Embracing the pleats, creases and tucks of the Japanese art of decorative paper folding, Cornell University researchers are uncovering how origami principles could lead to exotic materials, soft robots and even tiny transformers. Publishing online in the journal Science Aug. 8.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Science
Small, origami-inspired pop-up robots function autonomously
Inspired by the traditional Japanese art form of origami or 'folding paper,' researchers have developed a way to coax flat sheets of composite materials to self-fold into complex robots that crawl and turn.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Research

Contact: Natasha D. Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Nature
NIST ion duet offers tunable module for quantum simulator
Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have demonstrated a pas de deux of atomic ions that combines the fine choreography of dance with precise individual control. The ion duet, described in the Aug. 7 issue of Nature, is a component for a flexible quantum simulator that could be scaled up in size and configured to model quantum systems of a complexity that overwhelms traditional computer simulations.
Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
The next graphene?
Three University of California, Riverside engineers are part of team recently awarded a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to characterize, analyze and synthesize a new class of ultra-thin film materials that could improve the performance of personal electronics, optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Butterflies could hold key to probes that repair genes
New discoveries about how butterflies feed could help engineers develop tiny probes that siphon liquid out of single cells for a wide range of medical tests and treatments, according to Clemson University researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Konstantin Kornev
kkornev@clemson.edu
864-656-6541
Clemson University

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Nanotechnology
Used-cigarette butts offer energy storage solution
A group of scientists from South Korea have converted used-cigarette butts into a high-performing material that could be integrated into computers, handheld devices, electrical vehicles and wind turbines to store energy.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Diamond defect interior design
By carefully controlling the position of an atomic-scale diamond defect within a volume smaller than what some viruses would fill, researchers have cleared a path toward better quantum computers and nanoscale sensors. They describe their technique in a paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Speedier diagnosis of diseases such as cancer likely thanks to new DNA analysis technique
Researchers from McGill University and the Génome Québec Innovation Centre have achieved a technical breakthrough that should result in speedier diagnosis of cancer and various pre-natal conditions.
National Research and Engineering Council of Canada, Canadian Institute for Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Katherine Gombay
katherine.gombay@mcgill.ca
514-398-2189
McGill University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Bottling up sound waves
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a technique for generating acoustic bottles in open air that can bend the paths of sound waves along prescribed convex trajectories. These self-bending bottle beams hold promise for ultrasonic imaging and therapy, and acoustic cloaking, levitation and particle manipulation.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Langmuir
Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into small clusters
Researchers at HZB in cooperation with Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin have made an astonishing observation: they were investigating the formation of gold nanoparticles in a solvent and observed that the nanoparticles had not distributed themselves uniformly, but instead were self-assembled into small clusters.

Contact: Armin Hoell
hoell@helmholtz-berlin.de
49-308-062-14678
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Nanoscale details of electrochemical reactions in electric vehicle battery materials
Using a new method to track the electrochemical reactions in a common electric vehicle battery material under operating conditions, scientists have revealed new insight into why fast charging inhibits this material's performance. The results could inform battery makers' efforts to optimize materials for faster-charging batteries with higher capacity.
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
On-chip topological light
First came the concept of topological light. Then came images of topological light moving around a microchip. Now full measurements of the transmission of light around and through the chip.
European Research Council, US Army, National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Nature
Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states
As a quantum state collapses from a quantum superposition to a classical state or a different superposition, it will follow a path known as a quantum trajectory. For each start and end state there is an optimal or 'most likely' path, but it is not as easy to predict the path or track it experimentally as a straight-line between two points would be in our everyday, classical world. In a new paper featured on the July 30 cover of Nature, scientists from the Institute for Quantum Studies at Chapman University, the University of Rochester, University of California at Berkeley, and Washington University in St. Louis have shown that it is possible to track these quantum trajectories and compare them to a recently developed theory for predicting the most likely path a system will take between two states.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
European Urology
Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy
Researchers and doctors at A*STAR's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, Singapore General Hospital and National Cancer Centre Singapore have co-developed the first molecular test kit that can predict treatment and survival outcomes in kidney cancer patients. This breakthrough was recently reported in European Urology, the world's top urology journal.
Agency for Science, Technology and Research

Contact: Hiroshi Limmell
hiroshi_limmell@a-star.edu.sg
65-947-41738
Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Carnegie Mellon chemists create nanofibers using unprecedented new method
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a novel method for creating self-assembled protein/polymer nanostructures that are reminiscent of fibers found in living cells. The work offers a promising new way to fabricate materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Carnegie Mellon's Controlled Radical Polymerization, Oregon State University

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Quantum Physics
Chapman University scientists introduce new cosmic connectivity
Recently physicists at Chapman University's Institute for Quantum Studies introduced the Quantum Cheshire Cat. Now they have introduced another quantum animal: the Quantum Pigeon as reported in worldwide media including a feature article in the July 30 issue of New Scientist, Nature, PhysicsWorld, the BBC, and more.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Free pores for molecule transport
Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can take up gases similar to a sponge that soaks up liquids. Hence, these highly porous materials are suited for storing hydrogen or greenhouse gases. However, loading of many MOFs is inhibited by barriers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology now report in Nature Communications that the barriers are caused by corrosion of the MOF surface. This can be prevented by water-free synthesis and storing strategies.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Chemical Communications
Chemists demonstrate 'bricks-and-mortar' assembly of new molecular structures
Chemists at Indiana University Bloomington have described the self-assembly of large, symmetrical molecules in bricks-and-mortar fashion, a development with potential value for the field of organic electronic devices such as field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NSF grant to Wayne State supports new concept for manufacturing nanoscale devices
According to the National Science Foundation, nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of functional materials, devices, and systems with novel properties and functions. A major bottleneck in scaling up nanotechnology is the lack of manufacturing methods that connect different functional materials into one device. A research team led by Dr. Guangzhao Mao, professor of chemical engineering and materials science at Wayne State University, is seeking answers to this problem.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1698.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>