News Tips from ACS NANO DOE Research News Site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
26-Apr-2015 15:29
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Options

Portal Home

Glossary

Background Articles

Research Papers

Meetings

Links & Resources

Essays

Online Chats

RSS Feed

Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1771.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Nature Materials
Seeing tiny twins
To fully understand how nanomaterials behave, one must also understand the atomic-scale deformation mechanisms that determine their structure and, therefore, their strength and function.

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
Nano Letters
ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites in batteries
Scientists have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Graphene meets heat waves
EPFL researchers have shed new light on the fundamental mechanisms of heat dissipation in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. They have shown that heat can propagate as a wave over very long distances. This is key information for engineering the electronics of tomorrow.

Contact: Andrea Cepellotti
andrea.cepellotti@epfl.ch
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Nature
Fluid-filled pores separate materials with fine precision
A team of Harvard scientists has developed an entirely new, highly versatile mechanism for controlling passage of materials through micropores, using fluid to modulate their opening and closing.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Cell
Biomolecular force generation based on the principle of a gas spring
Scientists at Technische Universität Dresden have now been able to add another piece to the puzzle of cell biological mechanisms, as they report in the latest issue of the renowned scientific journal Cell on March 5, 2015.

Contact: Dr. Stefan Diez
stefan.diez@tu-dresden.de
49-351-463-43010
Technische Universität Dresden

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
ACS Nano
Medical nanoparticles: Local treatment of lung cancer
Nanoparticles can function as carriers for medicines to combat lung cancer: working in a joint project, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich have developed nanocarriers that site-selectively release medicines/drugs at the tumor site in human and mouse lungs. In the journal, ACS Nano, the scientists reported that this approach led to a significant increase in the effectiveness of current cancer medicines in lung tumor tissue.

Contact: Dr. Silke Meiners
silke.meiners@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-089-318-74673
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
New paint makes tough self-cleaning surfaces
A new paint that makes robust self-cleaning surfaces has been developed by a team led by UCL researchers. The coating can be applied to clothes, paper, glass and steel and when combined with adhesives, maintains its self-cleaning properties after being wiped, scratched with a knife and scuffed with sandpaper.

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Breakthrough in nonlinear optics research
A method to selectively enhance or inhibit optical nonlinearities in a chip-scale device has been developed by scientists, led by the University of Sydney. The researchers from the Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems, based at the University of Sydney, Australia, published their results in Nature Communications today.
Australian Research Council, Laureate Fellowship, ARC Future Fellowship Centre of Excellence

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
International Electron Device Meeting
UT Dallas technology could make night vision, thermal imaging affordable
This technology reaches nearly 10 terahertz, the highest frequency manufactured in CMOS.
Texas Analog Center of Excellence, Semiconductor Research Corporation

Contact: LaKisha Ladson
lakisha.ladson@UTDallas.edu
972-883-4183
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Applied Physics Letters
First scientific publication from data collected at NSLS-II
Just weeks after NSLS-II achieved first light, a team of scientists at the X-Ray Powder Diffraction beamline tested a setup that yielded data on thermoelectric materials and resulted in science published in Applied Physics Letters - Materials.
Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
New incubator network to help clean-energy entrepreneurs
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute have launched the Clean Energy Incubator Network. The program, funded by the Energy Department, aims to improve the performance of clean energy business incubators, connect critical industry and energy sector partners, and advance clean energy technologies emerging from universities and federal laboratories.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Nature Materials
The taming of magnetic vortices
Magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, could in future store and process information very efficiently. They could also be the basis for high-frequency components. For the first time, a team of physicists succeeded in characterizing the electromagnetic properties of insulating, semiconducting and conducting skyrmion-materials and developed a unified theoretical description of their behavior. This lays the foundation for future electronic components with purpose-designed properties.
European Research Council, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, TUM Graduate School

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information
Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and Forschungszentrum Jülich together with a colleague at the French CNRS in Strasbourg have found a new way to electrically read out the orientation of magnetic vortices in nanodisks. Their method relies on measuring characteristic microwaves emanating from the vortices. Knowledge about these signals could be used for constructing extremely small components for novel memory technology or wireless data transmission. The results are published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Materials
The rub with friction
In a new paper in Nature Materials, Brandeis University professor Zvonomir Dogic and his lab explored friction at the microscopic level. They discovered that the force generating friction is much stronger than previously thought. The discovery is an important step toward understanding the physics of the cellular and molecular world and designing the next generation of microscopic and nanotechnologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@brandeis.edu
781-736-4027
Brandeis University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New nanodevice defeats drug resistance
A nanodevice from MIT researchers can disable drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nanoscale
Glass coating improves battery performance
Researchers in the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside have investigated a strategy to prevent this 'polysulfide shuttling' phenomenon by creating nano-sized sulfur particles, and coating them in silica, otherwise known as glass.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
ACS Nano
Colon + septic tank = unique, at times stinky, study
What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Advanced Healthcare Materials
Pens filled with high-tech inks for do-it-yourself sensors
A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. The team from the University of California, San Diego, developed high-tech inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They tested the sensors to measure glucose and pollution.

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Smart crystallization
The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This 'smart material' is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Councils UK, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
American Physical Society 2015 March Meeting
International research partnership tricks the light fantastic
A manipulation of light through tiny technology could lead to big benefits for everything from TVs to microscopes.
Australian Research Council, Hanna Fellowship, University of Cincinnati Research Council

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Chemistry of Materials
Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum
Aerogels made of graphene nanoribbons and modified with boron and nitrogen are more efficient catalysts for fuel cells and air-metal batteries than expensive platinum is, according to researchers at Rice University.
The Welch Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Army Research Office/Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, and others

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Breakthrough in OLED technology
A new study from a team of researchers in California and Japan shows that organic light emitting diodes made with finely patterned structures can produce bright, low-power light sources, a key step toward making organic lasers. The results are reported in a paper appearing this week on the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
ACS Nano
Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer
Researchers have long sought an efficient way to untangle DNA to study its structure -- neatly unraveled and straightened out -- under a microscope. Now, researchers at KU Leuven have devised a simple and effective solution: they inject genetic material into a droplet of water and use a pipet tip to drag it over a glass plate covered with a sticky polymer.

Contact: Johan Hofkens
johan.hofkens@chem.kuleuven.be
32-163-27804
KU Leuven

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Science Advances
CWRU researchers bring clean energy a step closer
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have made an inexpensive metal-free catalyst that performs as well as costly metal catalysts at speeding the oxygen reduction reaction in an acidic fuel cell, and is more durable. The catalyst is made of sheets of nitrogen-doped graphene that provides great surface area, carbon nanotubes that enhance conductivity, and carbon black particles that separate the layers allowing the electrolyte and oxygen to flow freely, which greatly increased performance and efficiency.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Looking into the light
Jon Schuller, professor of electrical and computer engineering, receives an NSF CAREER award to investigate the interactions between light and organic materials.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1771.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>