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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1719.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Using solar energy to turn raw materials into ingredients for every day life
QUT scientist Dr. Sarina Sarina, who achieved outstanding progress in driving this energy intensive chemical production process at ambient temperature using light instead of fossil fuels, has won the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt fellowship at the famous Max Planck Institute in Berlin.

Contact: Rose Trapnell
rose.trapnell@qut.edu.au
040-758-5901
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Applied Materials and Interfaces
Nanoribbon film keeps glass ice-free
Rice University scientists who created a deicing film for radar domes have now refined the technology to work as a transparent coating for glass.
The Lockheed Martin Aerospace Co., Office of Naval Research/Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature
Water-based nuclear battery developed by MU can be used to generate electrical energy
From cell phones to cars and flashlights, batteries play an important role in everyday life. Scientists and technology companies constantly are seeking ways to improve battery life and efficiency. Now, for the first time using a water-based solution, researchers at the University of Missouri have created a long-lasting and more efficient nuclear battery that could be used for many applications such as a reliable energy source in automobiles and also in complicated applications such as space flight.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
The future face of molecular electronics
The emerging field of molecular electronics could take our definition of portable to the next level, enabling the construction of tiny circuits from molecular components. In these highly efficient devices, individual molecules would take on the roles currently played by comparatively-bulky wires, resistors and transistors. A team of researchers has identified a potential candidate for use in small-scale electronics: a molecule called picene.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Smart Materials and Structures
'Smart material' chin strap harvests energy from chewing
A chin strap that can harvest energy from jaw movements has been created by a group of researchers in Canada.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Science
Cells simply avoid chromosome confusion
Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors. This natural safeguard prevents incorrect chromosome counts and misalignments that lead to infertility, miscarriage, or congenital conditions.
Wellcome Trust, National Institutes of Health, Packard Fellowship, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sidney Kimmel Foundation

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Grant to help commercialize silicon surgical blades
A UC Davis engineering professor has received a grant of $200,000 from the National Science Foundation 'Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research-Technology Translation' program to move his silicon-based blades towards commercial development as surgical and shaving tools.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Northeastern University researchers develop novel method for working with nanotubes
Northeastern University researchers have developed a novel method for controllably constructing precise inter-nanotube junctions and a variety of nanocarbon structures in carbon nanotube arrays. The researchers were able to tailor the physical properties of nanotube networks for use in applications from electronic devices to carbon nanotube-reinforced composite materials found in cars and sports equipment. The findings were published in a Nature Communications paper titled 'Sculpting carbon bonds for allotropic transformation through solid-state re-engineering of –sp2 carbon.'
National Science Foundation, The Republic of Korea Ministry of Industry

Contact: John O'Neill
j.oneill@neu.edu
617-373-5460
Northeastern University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers
Rice University scientists make 'neat' carbon nanotube fibers with an acid-free process.
Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Scientists mapped quantum phase transitions at temperatures colder than interstellar space. The ultra-cold conditions isolated the fluctuations that define the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials. The research provides new methods to identify and understand materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Medicine
Blood-cleansing biospleen device developed for sepsis therapy
Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in a patient's blood -- often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen and developed by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, DOD/Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, Harvard's Wyss Institute

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Modern Physics Letters B
New family of materials for energy-efficient information storage and processing
Hexagonal rare earth ferrites have been demonstrated to exhibit both spontaneous electric and magnetic dipole moments (as a rare case), which may enable couplings of the static electric and magnetic fields in these materials, suggesting application in energy-efficient information storage and processing.
Nebraska EPSCoR

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
NSF funds new method for making materials that can make lighter, more efficient vehicles
Diana Lados, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and founding director of the university's Integrative Materials Design Center, has received a three-year, $424,000 award from the National Science Foundation to support the development of a new way to manufacture metal-ceramic composites, which can be used to make vehicles lighter and more energy efficient, while significantly increasing their performance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Dorsey
mwdorsey@wpi.edu
508-831-5609
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
​NTU spin-off achieves breakthrough with innovative multifunction membranes
A young startup at Nanyang Technological University has developed a first-of-its-kind multifunction water filtration membrane.

Contact: Lester Kok
lesterkok@ntu.edu.sg
65-679-06804
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Researchers create world's largest DNA origami
Researchers have created the world's largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Science
New species of electrons can lead to better computing
Electrons that break the rules and move perpendicular to the applied electric field could be the key to delivering next generation, low-energy computers, a collaboration of scientists from the University of Manchester and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene paints a corrosion-free future
A thin layer of graphene paint can make impermeable and chemically resistant coatings which could be used for packaging to keep food fresh for longer and protect metal structures against corrosion, new findings from the University of Manchester show.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Science
The sound of an atom has been captured
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology are first to show the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light. The results will be published in the journal Science.
Swedish Research Council, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, European Research Council, Wenner-Gren Foundations

Contact: Johanna Wilde
johanna.wilde@chalmers.se
46-317-722-029
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature
Excitonic dark states shed light on TMDC atomic layers
Berkeley Lab researchers believe they have uncovered the secret behind the unusual optoelectronic properties of single atomic layers of TMDC materials, the two-dimensional semiconductors that hold great promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
UT Arlington research uses nanotechnology to help cool electrons with no external sources
A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
Advanced light source sets microscopy record
Working at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers used 'soft' X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size. This resolution is the highest ever achieved with X-ray microscopy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Penn engineers advance understanding of graphene's friction properties
On the macroscale, adding fluorine atoms to carbon-based materials makes for water-repellant, non-stick surfaces, such as Teflon. However, on the nanoscale, adding fluorine to graphene had been reported to vastly increase the friction experienced when sliding against the material. Through a combination of physical experiments and atomistic simulations, a University of Pennsylvania team has discovered the mechanism behind this surprising finding, which could help researchers better design and control the surface properties of new materials.
National Science Foundation, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
How skin falls apart: Pathology of autoimmune skin disease is revealed at the nanoscale
University at Buffalo researchers and colleagues studying a rare, blistering disease have discovered new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University at Buffalo

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New method to detect prize particle for future quantum computing
Research published today in the journal Nature Communications uncovers a new method to detect Majorana particles, a key element for a next-generation quantum computing platform.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
44-148-368-6141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
Two-dimensional electron liquids
Using an overlying bath of ionic liquid, a piece of superconductor -- divided by an insulating strip -- supports narrow tunnels which permit currents to flow between.
Air Force Office of Science Research, US Army Research Office, and others

Contact: Philllip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1719.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>