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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1877.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Berkeley Lab scientists grow atomically thin transistors and circuits
In an advance that helps pave the way for next-generation electronics and computing technologies -- and possibly paper-thin gadgets -- scientists with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a way to chemically assemble transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick.
Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Setting the gold standard
A team of University of Florida researchers has figured out how gold can be used in crystals grown by light to create nanoparticles, a discovery that has major implications for industry and cancer treatment and could improve the function of pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and solar panels.
Air Force Office of Science Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Wei David Wei
wwei@mail.ufl.edu
352-392-2050
University of Florida

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nano Letters
Atomic bits despite zero-point energy?
Scientists at Jülich have found out that zero-point energy plays an important role in the stability of nanomagnets. These are of great technical interest for the magnetic storage of data, but so far have never been sufficiently stable. Researchers are now pointing the way to making it possible to produce nanomagnets with low zero-point energy and thus a higher degree of stability (Nanoletters).

Contact: Angela Wenzik
a.wenzik@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-6048
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Physicists discover family of tetraquarks
Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-9038
Syracuse University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Science Advances
Scientists simulate tiny bacteria-powered 'windfarm'
A team of scientists from Oxford University has shown how the natural movement of bacteria could be harnessed to assemble and power microscopic 'windfarms' -- or other man-made micromachines such as smartphone components.

Contact: Stuart Gillespie
stuart.gillespie@admin.ox.ac.uk
44-018-652-83877
University of Oxford

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
New Mexico African-American Affairs office honors 2 from Sandia
Two Sandia National Laboratories employees have been named recipients of 2016 Outstanding Service Awards from the New Mexico Office of African-American Affairs. Research engineer Conrad James and Theresa A. Carson, a senior manager in Sandia's Supply Chain Management Center, were recognized for their strong commitment to improving the quality of life for African-Americans in the community. The 13th annual service awards recognize dedication to education, community development, health care advocacy and economic advancement for African-Americans.

Contact: Rebecca Brock
rabrock@sandia.gov
505-844-7772
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
NJIT receives $1 million grant from Keck Foundation for pioneering research in biophysics and nanotechnology
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation for a three-year project titled 'Engineering New Materials Based on Topological Phonon Edge Modes.'

Contact: Tanya Klein
klein@njit.edu
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers harness DNA as the engine of super-efficient nanomachine
Researchers at McMaster University have established a way to harness DNA as the engine of a microscopic 'machine' they can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances that range from viruses and bacteria to cocaine and metals.

Contact: John Brennan
brennanj@mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140 x20706
McMaster University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers improve performance of cathode material by controlling oxygen activity
An international team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to increase the robustness and energy storage capability of a particular class of 'lithium-rich' cathode materials -- by using a carbon dioxide-based gas mixture to create oxygen vacancies at the material's surface. Researchers said the treatment improved the energy density -- the amount of energy stored per unit mass -- of the cathode material by up to 30 to 40 percent.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
On the path toward molecular robots
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots.
PRESTO of Japan Science and Technology Agency, CRIS OPEN FACILITY at Hokkaido University, Japan

Contact: Naoki NAMBA
pr@oia.hokudai.ac.jp
81-117-068-034
Hokkaido University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Nature
Flipping crystals improves solar-cell performance
In a step that could bring perovskite crystals closer to use in the burgeoning solar power industry, researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northwestern University and Rice University have tweaked their crystal production method and developed a new type of two-dimensional layered perovskite with outstanding stability and more than triple the material's previous power conversion efficiency.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
'Origami' is reshaping DNA's future
Ten years after Paul Rothemund knitted tiny smiley faces from strands of DNA, the field of DNA origami is coming of age. Three nanoscience pioneers -- including Rothemund of the California Institute of Technology, William Shih of Harvard Medical School and Shawn Douglas of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine -- discuss the technique's potential.

Contact: Jim Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
805-278-7495
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Integrated trio of 2-D nanomaterials unlocks graphene electronics applications
Titled 'An integrated Tantalum Sulfide--Boron Nitride--Graphene Oscillator: A Charge-Density-Wave Device Operating at Room Temperature,' the paper describes the development of the first useful device that exploits the potential of charge-density waves to modulate an electrical current through a 2-D material. The new technology could become an ultralow power alternative to conventional silicon-based devices, which are used in thousands of applications from computers to clocks to radios.
National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation Nanoelectronic Research Initiative, Semiconductor Research Corporation, Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, others

Contact: Sarah Nightingale
sarah.nightingale@ucr.edu
951-827-4580
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
From super to ultra-resolution microscopy
A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has, for the first time, been able to tell apart features distanced only 5 nanometers from each other in a densely packed, single molecular structure and to achieve the so far highest resolution in optical microscopy. Reported on July 4 in a study in Nature Nanotechnology, the technology, also called 'discrete molecular imaging', enhances the team's DNA nanotechnology-powered super-resolution microscopy platform with an integrated set of new imaging methods.

Contact: Benjamin Boettner
Benjamin.Boettner@wyss.harvard.edu
917-913-8051
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature
Penn chemists establish fundamentals of ferroelectric materials
Chemists from the University of Pennsylvania are enabling the next generation of research into ferroelectric materials. In a new study, published in Nature, they demonstrate a multiscale simulation of lead titanate oxide that provides new understanding about what it takes for polarizations within these materials to switch.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 4-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
A little impurity makes nanolasers shine: ANU media release
Scientists at The Australian National University have improved the performance of tiny lasers by adding impurities, in a discovery which will be central to the development of low-cost biomedical sensors, quantum computing, and a faster internet. Researcher Tim Burgess added atoms of zinc to lasers one hundredth the diameter of a human hair and made of gallium arsenide -- a material used extensively in smartphones and other electronic devices,.

Contact: Tim Burgess
tim.burgess@anu.edu.au
61-408-400-036
Australian National University

Public Release: 3-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Building a better bowtie
Bowtie-shaped nanostructures may advance the development of quantum devices.

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
2016 Dirac Medal for Physics to Chapman University's Visiting Professor Sandu Popescu
Professor Sandu Popescu from the University of Bristol and Distinguished Visiting Professor and founding member of the Institute for Quantum Studies (IQS) at Chapman University in California, has won the 2016 Dirac Medal in Physics for his research on fundamental aspects of quantum physics.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
Researcher pursues new applications for 'hot' electrons
Three years after his discovery of porous gold nanoparticles -- gold nanoparticles that offer a larger surface area because of their porous nature -- a University of Houston researcher is continuing to explore the science and potential applications.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 29-Jun-2016
Nature
A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed a system that enables them to switch back and forth the adhesion and stiction (static friction) of a water drop on a solid surface. The change in voltage is expressed macroscopically in the contact angle between the drop and the surface. This effect can be attributed to the change in the surface properties on the nanometer scale.

Contact: Thomas Greber
greber@physik.uzh.ch
41-446-355-744
University of Zurich

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
NSF grants IU $525,000 to advance research on molecular transformation, carbon recycling
Two Indiana University chemists have received $525,000 from the National Science Foundation to advance research with applications to the emerging field of carbon recycling.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
812-856-2988
Indiana University

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Optica
New mid-infrared laser system could detect atmospheric chemicals
MIT researchers have found a way to use mid-infrared lasers to turn molecules in the open air into glowing filaments of electrically charged gas, or plasma. The method could make possible remote environmental monitoring to detect chemicals with high sensitivity.
US Air Force/Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Karl-Lydie
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Engineers to use cyborg insects as biorobotic sensing machines
A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis wants to capitalize on the sense of smell in locusts to create new biorobotic sensing systems that could be used in homeland security applications.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Erika Ebsworth-Goold
eebsworth-goold@wustl.edu
314-935-2914
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Small
One giant leap for the future of safe drug delivery
By using an innovative 3-D inkjet printing method, researchers from Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Sheffield have taken the biggest step yet in producing microscopic silk swimming devices that are biodegradable and harmless to a biological system.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Sophie Hylands
s.hylands@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-222-166
University of Sheffield - Faculty of Engineering

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Journal of Chemical Physics
Tiniest imperfections make big impacts in nano-patterned materials
A research team at Clarkson University reports an interesting conclusion that could have major impacts on the future of nano-manufacturing. Their analysis for a model of the process of random sequential adsorption shows that even a small imprecision in the position of the lattice landing sites can dramatically affect the density of the permanently formed deposit.

Contact: AIP Media Line
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1877.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>