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News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1805.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists pave way for diamonds to trace early cancers
Physicists from the University of Sydney, Australia, have devised a way to use diamonds to identify cancerous tumours before they become life threatening. Their findings, published today in Nature Communications, reveal how a nanoscale, synthetic version of the precious gem can light up early-stage cancers in non-toxic, non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence Scheme

Contact: Vivienne Reiner
University of Sydney

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Light: Science and Applications
Using optical fiber to generate a two-micron laser
Lasers with a wavelength of two microns could move the boundaries of surgery and molecule detection. Researchers at EPFL have managed to generate such lasers using a simple and inexpensive method.

Contact: Camille Bres
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science Advances
Chance effect of lab's fluorescent lights leads to discovery
An accidental discovery of a 'quantum Etch-a-Sketch' may lead to the next generation of advanced computers and quantum microchips. The lab's fluorescent lights generated surprising effects with potentially important impacts -- a new way of using beams of light to draw and erase quantum-mechanical circuits.
US Office of Naval Research, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
Penn State

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Faster design -- better catalysts
While the cleaning of car exhausts is among the best known applications of catalytic processes, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Practically the entire chemical industry relies on catalytic reactions. Therefore, catalyst design plays a key role in improving these processes. An international team of scientists has now developed a concept, that elegantly correlates geometric and adsorption properties. They validated their approach by designing a new platinum-based catalyst for fuel cell applications.
European Union, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, German Research Council, Helmholtz Energy Alliance

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Frontiers in Neuroscience
Breakthrough for electrode implants in the brain
For nearly nine years, researchers at Lund University have been working on developing implantable electrodes that can capture signals from single neurons in the brain over a long period of time -- without causing brain tissue damage. They are now one big step closer to reaching this goal, and the results are published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.

Contact: Jens Schouenborg
Lund University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Room temperature magnetic skyrmions, a new type of digital memory?
An exotic, swirling object with the sci-fi name of a 'magnetic skyrmion' could be the future of nanoelectronics and memory storage. Physicists at UC Davis and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have now succeeded in making magnetic skyrmions, formerly found at temperatures close to absolute zero, at room temperature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
NIST, UC Davis scientists float new approach to creating computer memory
A research team has created the exotic ring-shaped magnetic effects called skyrmions under ambient room conditions for the first time. The achievement brings skyrmions a step closer to use in real-world data storage as well as other novel magnetic and electronic technologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Chad Boutin
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Energy researchers discover new structure for bimetallic catalysts
Dion Vlachos, who directs the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation at the University of Delaware, uses computational techniques to predict how nanoscale materials will behave and recently made a surprising discovery about the structure of bimetallic catalysts. An imperfect surface may produce a better catalyst.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Bothum
University of Delaware

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
End to contaminated drinking water
As things stand, a suspected contamination of drinking water requires that a technician first be sent out to take samples from the water supply. The samples are then cultured and analysed in the laboratory. Only after several days does it become clear whether the water is contaminated and which bacterium is the offender.

Contact: Erik Gustav Skands
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Journal of Biomedical Optics
New microscopy technology augments surgeon's view for greater accuracy
Researchers at the University of Arizona in Tucson have developed a prototype of a new microscope technology that could help surgeons work with a greater degree of accuracy in diagnosing cancer or performing brain surgery or other procedures. The new technology, call augmented microscopy, is reported today in the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amy Nelson
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Angewandte Chemie
Detecting HIV diagnostic antibodies with DNA nanomachines
An international team of researchers have designed and synthesized a nanometer-scale DNA 'machine' whose customized modifications enable it to recognize a specific target antibody.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Institutes of Health, European Resarch Council, Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
University of Montreal

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
Double the (quantum) fun
A group of researchers in Japan is exploring the behavior of a certain type of SET (single-electron transistor) made from two quantum dots, which are bits of material so small they start to exhibit quantum properties. The group has produced a detailed analysis of the electrical characteristics of the so-called double-quantum-dot SETs, which could help researchers design better devices to manipulate single electrons. They report their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Department of Defense awards nearly $6 million grant to further bone fracture repair research
A collaborative research team led by scientists at Houston Methodist is one step closer to developing technologies that could help mend broken bones faster. The Department of Defense awarded close to $6 million to the Houston Methodist Research Institute for an initiative aimed at studying two new materials to repair complex fractures in long bones.
Department of Defense Medical Research and Development Program, Combat Casualty Care

Contact: Gale Smith
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Professor Nanfang Yu wins DARPA Young Faculty Award for optoelectronics research
Columbia Engineering applied physics professor Nanfang Yu has won the prestigious DARPA Young Faculty Award, which will support his work on metasurface-based flat optical modulators, using strong interactions between light and 2-D-structured materials to control light at will. Yu hopes to demonstrate spatial light modulators -- high-speed and lightweight optoelectronic devices -- that are crucial for light detection and ranging, technology useful for a wide range of applications, including remote sensing, navigation, and surveillance.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Holly Evarts
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
ORNL researchers find 'greener' way to assemble materials for solar applications
The efficiency of solar cells depends on precise engineering of polymers that assemble into films 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. Today, formation of that polymer assembly requires solvents that can harm the environment, but scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a 'greener' way to control the assembly of photovoltaic polymers in water using a surfactant -- a detergent-like molecule -- as a template.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Graphene teams up with two-dimensional crystals for faster data communications
In the recent work published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the research group led by professor at ICFO Frank Koppens has shown that a two-dimensional crystal, combined with graphene, has the capability to detect optical pulses with a response faster than 10 picoseconds, while maintaining a high efficiency.

Contact: Alina Hirschmann
ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Big range of behaviors for tiny graphene pores
Researchers at MIT have created tiny pores in single sheets of graphene that have an array of preferences and characteristics similar to those of ion channels in living cells.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Observing the unobservable: Researchers measure electron orbitals of molecules in 3-D
Electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of the electrons in atoms and molecules. Scientists from the University of Graz, Forschungszentrum Jülich, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt have now succeeded in experimentally recording these structures in all three dimensions. They achieved this by further developing a method they had already applied two years ago to make these orbitals visible in two dimensions. Their findings have now been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

Contact: Tobias Schloesser
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
ACS Nano
Molecular nanoribbons as electronic highways
Physicists at Umeå University have, together with researchers at UC Berkeley, USA, developed a method to synthesise a unique and novel type of material which resembles a graphene nanoribbon but in molecular form. This material could be important for the further development of organic solar cells. The results have been published in the scientific journal ACS Nano.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
Umea University

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Electron tomography with 3,487 images in 3.5 seconds
Scientists from the Ernst Ruska-Centre used a transmission electron microscope to record almost 3,500 images in 3.5 seconds for the reconstruction of a 3-D electron tomogram. Previously, 10 to 60 minutes and a ten-fold greater electron dose were required to record such image sequences. The new capability is particularly suitable for examining cells, bacteria, viruses and dynamic processes, such as chemical reactions and electronic switching phenomena. The findings have been published in Scientific Reports.

Contact: Tobias Schloesser
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing
A team of Australian engineers has built a quantum logic gate in silicon for the first time, making calculations between two qubits of information possible -- and thereby clearing the final hurdle to making silicon quantum computers a reality.
Australian Research Council, US Army Research Office, State Government of New South Wales, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, University of New South Wales, Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and others

Contact: Andrew Dzurak
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
Developing a nanoscale 'clutch'
A model microscopic system to demonstrate the transmission of torque in the presence of thermal fluctuations -- necessary for the creation of a tiny 'clutch' operating at the nanoscale -- has been assembled at the University of Bristol as part of an international collaboration.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
University of Bristol

Public Release: 2-Oct-2015
Micro photosynthetic power cells may be the green energy source for the next generation
A novel micro-technology, which captures the electrical power generated by the photosynthesis and respiration of blue-green algae.

Contact: Philly Lim
World Scientific

Public Release: 2-Oct-2015
NUS making waves in the brave new world of synthetic biology
The National University of Singapore launched a new research initiative called the NUS Synthetic Biology for Clinical and Technological Innovation to further develop research capacity and capabilities in the emerging and fast-growing field, which has the potential to be the next engine for economic growth for technologically advanced countries, including Singapore.

Contact: Carolyn Fong
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 2-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
A necklace of fractional vortices
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have arrived at how what is known as time-reversal symmetry can break in one class of superconducting material. The results have been published in the highly ranked Nature Physics journal, which also put the Chalmers researchers' study on the cover.

Contact: Johanna Wilde
Chalmers University of Technology

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1805.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>