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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1451-1475 out of 1807.

<< < 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 > >>

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Flexible battery, no lithium required
A Rice University laboratory has created a thin, flexible film that combines the best qualities of batteries and supercapacitors.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology

Contact: David Ruth
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Physics
Beyond graphene: Controlling properties of 2-D materials
Researchers at the University of Manchester have shown how they can control the properties of stacks of two-dimensional materials, opening up opportunities for new, previously-unimagined electronic devices.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
University of Manchester

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Multilayer, microscale solar cells enable ultrahigh efficiency power generation
A printing approach, developed by John Rogers and colleagues at the University of Illinois, allows manipulation of ultrathin, small semiconductor elements that can be stacked on top of one another to yield an unusual type of solar cell capable of operating across the entire solar spectrum at exceptionally high efficiency.

Contact: John A. Rogers
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
How to create nanowires only 3 atoms wide with an electron beam
A Vanderbilt graduate student who is a visiting scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used a focused beam of electrons to create some of the smallest nanowires ever made. The discovery gives a boost to efforts aimed at creating electrical circuits on mono-layered materials, raising the possibility of flexible, paper-thin tablets and television displays.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Protecting olive oil from counterfeiters
Who guarantees that expensive olive oil isn't counterfeit or adulterated? An invisible label, developed by ETH Zurich researchers, could perform this task. The tag consists of tiny magnetic DNA particles encapsulated in a silica casing and mixed with the oil.

Contact: Robert Grass
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Your T-shirt's ringing: Telecommunications in the spaser age
A new version of 'spaser' technology being investigated could mean that mobile phones become so small, efficient, and flexible they could be printed on clothing.

Contact: Glynis Smalley
Monash University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Gold nanoparticles help target, quantify breast cancer segments in a living cell
Purdue University researchers have developed a way to detect and measure cancer levels in a living cell by using tiny gold particles with tails of synthetic DNA.
National Science Foundation, Indiana Clinical Transitional Sciences Institute, Purdue Center for Cancer Research, Samsung

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
Purdue University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Physical Review X
Steering chemical reactions with laser pulses
Ultra short laserpulses in the femtosecond-range give scientists a powerful new method of controlling chemical reactions. A team of researchers could now show that the fragmentation of carbohydrates can be controlled by these pulses.

Contact: Florian Aigner
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Nanoreporters tell 'sour' oil from 'sweet'
Scientists at Rice University have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence and concentration of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they're still in the ground.
Advanced Energy Consortium

Contact: David Ruth
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
7th International Nanotoxicology Congress
PETA science consortium to present hazard testing strategy at nanotoxicology meeting
PETA International Science Consortium will present a non-animal tiered-testing strategy for nanomaterial hazard assessment at the 7th International Nanotoxicology Congress being held in Antalya, Turkey on April 23-26, 2014. The proposed strategy will generate meaningful information on nanomaterial properties and their interaction with biological systems. It's cost-effective, reduces animal use, and can be applied for assessing risk and making intelligent regulatory decisions regarding the use and disposal of nanomaterials.

Contact: Tasgola Bruner
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
APL Materials
Vacuum ultraviolet lamp of the future created in Japan
A team of researchers in Japan has developed a solid-state lamp that emits high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light at the shortest wavelengths ever recorded for such a device, from 140 to 220 nanometers. This is within the range of vacuum-UV light -- so named because while light of that energy can propagate in a vacuum, it is quickly absorbed by oxygen in the air.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Cloaked DNA nanodevices survive pilot mission
By mimicking a viral strategy, scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have created the first cloaked DNA nanodevice that survives the body's immune defenses. Their success opens the door to smart DNA nanorobots that use logic to spot cancerous tissue and manufacture drugs on the spot to cripple it, as well as artificial microscopic containers called protocells that detect pathogens in food or toxic chemicals in drinking water.

Contact: Dan Ferber
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Nanomaterial outsmarts ions
Ions are an essential tool in chip manufacturing, but they can also be used to produce nano-sieves. A large number of electrons must be removed from the atoms for this purpose. Such ions either lose a large amount of energy or almost no energy at all as they pass through a membrane that measures one nanometer in thickness. Researchers report in the journal Physical Review Letters that this discovery is an important step towards developing novel types of electronic components made of graphene.

Contact: Simon Schmitt
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Like a hall of mirrors, nanostructures trap photons inside ultrathin solar cells
'We want to make sure light spends more quality time inside a solar cell,' said Mark Brongersma, a professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford. He and two co-authors surveyed 109 scientific papers involving ways to maximize the collisions between photons and electrons in the thinnest possible layer of photovoltaic material. The goal is to reveal trends and best practices that will help lower solar energy costs.

Contact: Tom Abate
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
RNA shows potential as boiling-resistant anionic polymer material for nanoarchitectures
Nanotechnology researchers at the University of Kentucky have discovered new methods to build boiling-resistant nanostructures and arrays using a new RNA triangle scaffold. These new RNA nanoarchitechtures can be used to form arrays with a controllable repeat number of the scaffold, resembling monomer units in a polymerization reaction. Their enhanced structural stability and controllability at the nano scale offer key advantages over traditional chemical polymers.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Keith Hautala
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
High-performance, low-cost ultracapacitors built with graphene and carbon nanotubes
By combining the powers of two single-atom-thick carbon structures, researchers at the George Washington University's Micro-propulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory have created a new ultracapacitor that is both high performance and low cost. The device, described in the Journal of Applied Physics, capitalizes on the synergy brought by mixing graphene flakes with single-walled carbon nanotubes, two carbon nanostructures with complementary properties.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Grant to fund research on possible cell contaminants
Scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas have received a federal grant to investigate how tiny carbon structures used in the manufacture of many everyday products might affect human health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Progress made in developing nanoscale electronics
Alexander Shestopalov, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rochester, has figured out how to reliably control the current that flows through a circuit that is the width of a single molecule.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
University of Rochester

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
MRI, on a molecular scale
A team of scientists, led by professor of physics and of applied physics Amir Yacoby, have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nano-scale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules.

Contact: Peter Reuell
Harvard University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin
Researchers from Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate, from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
Cornell University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair
A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matiere Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur from the Laboratoire Recherche Vasculaire Translationnelle (INSERM/Universites Paris Diderot and Paris 13), has just demonstrated that the principle of adhesion by aqueous solutions of nanoparticles can be used in vivo to repair soft-tissue organs and tissues.

Contact: Didier Letourneur
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Mantis shrimp, toucan and trilobite, oh my
A team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside professor of engineering have been selected to receive a $7.5 million Department of Defense grant to uncover fundamental design rules and develop simple and basic scientific foundations for the predictable design of light-weight, tough and strong advanced materials inspired by a wide diversity of structures from plants and animals, including the mantis shrimp, toucan and bamboo.
Department of Defense

Contact: Sean Nealon
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
New state-of-the-art biotech and nanotech equipment for INRS
Professor Marc André Gauthier and Professor Luca Razzari of the Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre have each been awarded large grants from the John R. Evans Leaders Fund of the Canada Foundation for Innovation for the acquisition of state-of-the-art biotech and nanophotonics equipment. To this funding will be added matching grants from the Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche, de la Science et de la Technologie.
Canada Foundation for Innovation, Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche, de la Science et de la Technologie du Québec

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Chiral breathing: Electrically controlled polymer changes its optical properties
Electrically controlled glasses with continuously adjustable transparency, new polarisation filters, and even chemosensors capable of detecting single molecules of specific chemicals could be fabricated thanks to a new polymer unprecedentedly combining optical and electrical properties.

Contact: Wlodzimierz Kutner
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1451-1475 out of 1807.

<< < 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 > >>