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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1677.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage
A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University.
Rice University, National Institutes of Health, IBM, CISCO, Qlogic, Adaptive Computing, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Rice nanophotonics experts create powerful molecular sensor
Nanophotonics experts at Rice University have created a unique sensor that amplifies the optical signature of molecules by about 100 billion times. Newly published tests found the device could accurately identify the composition and structure of individual molecules containing fewer than 20 atoms.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Smallest Swiss cross -- Made of 20 single atoms
The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Together with teams from Finland and Japan, physicists from the University of Basel were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest 'Swiss cross', thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices. The academic journal Nature Communications has published their results.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
PNNL scientists win 3 R&D 100 awards for visual display, analytics and energy technologies
Technologies that rival electronic screens, enable new molecular analysis and reduce dependence on fossil fuels received recognition for their innovation today.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Illinois researchers demonstrate novel, tunable nanoantennas
A University of Illinois research team has developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems, whereby plasmonic field enhancement can actuate mechanical motion. The team's fabrication process shows for the first time an innovative way of fabricating plasmonic nanoantenna structures under the SEM, which avoids complications such as proximity effects from conventional lithography techniques.

Contact: Kimani Toussaint
ktoussai@illinois.edu
217-244-4088
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Science
The world's first photonic router
Weizmann Institute scientists have demonstrated for the first time a photonic router -- a quantum device based on a single atom that enables routing of single photons by single photons. This achievement, as reported in Science magazine, is another step toward overcoming the difficulties in building quantum computers.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Rutgers chemists develop technology to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel
Rutgers researchers have developed a technology that could overcome a major cost barrier to make clean-burning hydrogen fuel -- a fuel that could replace expensive and environmentally harmful fossil fuels. The new technology is a novel catalyst that performs almost as well as cost-prohibitive platinum for so-called electrolysis reactions, which use electric currents to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. The Rutgers technology is also far more efficient than less-expensive catalysts investigated to-date.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2014
Nature Chemistry
Researchers discover boron 'buckyball'
The discovery of buckyballs -- soccer-ball-shaped molecules of carbon -- helped usher in the nanotechnology era. Now, researchers from Brown University and universities in China have shown that boron, carbon's neighbor on the periodic table, can form a cage-like molecule similar to the buckyball. Until now, such a boron structure had only been a theoretical speculation. The researchers dubbed their new-found nanostructure 'borospherene.'
National Science Foundation, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research
Sophisticated radiation detector designed for broad public use
Nuclear engineers have developed a small, portable and inexpensive radiation detection device that should help people all over the world better understand the radiation around them, its type and intensity, and whether or not it poses a health risk.

Contact: Abi Farsoni
abi.farsoni@oregonstate.edu
541-737-9645
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Universities of Surrey and Strathclyde selected as strategic partners in the future operation of the National Physical Laboratory
The Universities of Strathclyde and Surrey have been identified as preferred partners to enter into a new strategic partnership with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the world-renowned National Physical Laboratory (NPL), a global center of excellence in measurement and materials science. This new partnership will help to provide future leadership of NPL.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
01-483-686-141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Illinois study advances limits for ultrafast nano-devices
A recent study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale, and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
Army Research Office, US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: David G. Cahill
d-cahill@illinois.edu
217-333-6753
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Projecting a 3-dimensional future
A team of Tel Aviv University researchers has developed highly efficient holography based on nanoantennas, using the parameters of light itself to create dynamic and complex holographic images. Their research could be used for security as well as medical and recreational purposes, improving laser-based radars and advancing anti-counterfeiting techniques to safeguard against theft.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Physical Review E
Even geckos can lose their grip
Not even geckos and spiders can sit upside down forever. Nanophysics makes sure of that. Mechanics researchers at Linköping University have demonstrated this in an article just published in Physical Review E. Knowledge that can be of great industrial benefit.

Contact: Stefan Lindström
stefan.lindstrom@liu.se
46-013-281-127
Linköping University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Using sand to improve battery performance
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
International Union of Crystallography Journal
A possible pathway for inhibiting liver and colon cancer is found
A group of scientists from Spain, the UK and the United States has revealed the structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers.
National Institutes of Health, Plan Nacional of I+D, Diputación de Vizcaya

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance
A sponge-like silicon material could help lithium-ion batteries run longer on a single charge by giving the batteries' electrodes the space they need to expand without breaking.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Smart paint signals when equipment is too hot to handle
NJIT researchers have developed a paint for use in coatings and packaging that changes color when exposed to high temperatures, delivering a visual warning to people handling material or equipment with the potential to malfunction, explode, or cause burns when overheated.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UGA researchers use nanoparticles to enhance chemotherapy
University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug's ability to target and destroy cancerous cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shanta Dhar
shanta@uga.edu
706-542-1012
University of Georgia

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
The new atomic age: Building smaller, greener electronics
A University of Alberta research team is developing atom-scale, ultra-low-power computing devices to replace transistor circuits.

Contact: Bryan Alary
bryan.alary@ualberta.ca
780-492-0436
University of Alberta

Public Release: 6-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Nanojuice' could improve how doctors examine the gut
University at Buffalo researchers are developing a new imaging technique involving nanoparticles suspended in liquid to form 'nanojuice' that patients would drink. Upon reaching the small intestine, doctors would strike the nanoparticles with a harmless laser light, providing an unparalleled, non-invasive, real-time view of the organ.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science, Institute for Creative Technologies

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
With 'ribbons' of graphene, width matters
A novel method for producing ultra-narrow ribbons of graphene and then tuning the material's electrical properties holds promise for use in nano-devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lian Li
lianli@uwm.edu
414-229-5108
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science
Columbia researchers observe tunable quantum behavior in bilayer graphene
Columbia researchers have observed the fractional quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene and shown that this exotic state of matter can be tuned by an electric field.
Department of Defense, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, DARPA

Contact: Beth Kwon
byk2102@columbia.edu
212-854-6581
Columbia University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nature
A million times better
Nonlinear optical materials are widely used in laser systems. However, high light intensity and long propagation are required to produce strong nonlinear optical effects. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and the Technische Universitaet Muenchen created metamaterials with a million times stronger nonlinear optical response, compared to the traditional nonlinear materials, and demonstrated frequency conversion in films 100 times thinner than human hair using light intensity comparable to that of a laser pointer.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nanoscale
Making dreams come true: Making graphene from plastic?
A carbon material is developed without artificial defects commonly found during the production process of graphene while maintaining its original characteristics.
Korea Institute of Science and Technology

Contact: Dr. Han-Ik Joh
hijoh@kist.re.kr
82-102-732-5608
Korea Institute of Science and Technology

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Superconducting-silicon qubits
Theorists propose a way to make superconducting quantum devices such as Josephson junctions and qubits, atom-by-atom, inside a silicon crystal. Such systems could combine the most promising aspects of silicon spin qubits with the flexibility of superconducting circuits.
Laboratory for Physical Sciences

Contact: Phillip Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1677.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>