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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1712.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Optics Express
'Multi-spectra glasses' for scanning electron microscopy
Reflection zone plates produced by HZB enable lighter elements in material samples will be efficiently and precisely detected using scanning electron microscopy by providing high resolution in the range of 50-1120 eV.

Contact: Alexei Erko
alexei.erko@helmholtz-berlin.de
49-308-062-12945
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Optical Engineering
Single-photon detection, generation, and applications featured in Optical Engineering
A new special section in the SPIE journal Optical Engineering including several open-access papers covers analysis and applications of single-photon detection technology with applications as diverse as space exploration and quantum computing. The peer-reviewed journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in print and in the SPIE Digital Library.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
On the road to artificial photosynthesis
New experimental results from Berkeley Lab have revealed the critical influence of the electronic and geometric effects in the carbon dioxide reduction reaction.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Nanotechnology expert Somenath Mitra to receive NJIT Excellence in Research award
NJIT Distinguished Professor Somenath Mitra, Ph.D., whose pioneering research has spanned a spectrum of applications for carbon nanotechnology that address critical quality-of-life issues, will receive the seventh annual Board of Overseers Excellence in Research Prize and Medal on Oct. 2, 2014.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
World's smallest reference material is big plus for nanotechnology
The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently issued Reference Material 8027, the smallest known reference material ever created for validating measurements of these man-made, ultrafine particles between 1 and 100 nanometers -- billionths of a meter -- in size.

Contact: Michael E. Newman
michael.newman@nist.gov
301-975-3025
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Scripps Research Institute scientists awarded $7.9 million to develop artificial immune system
Scientists from both campuses of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded a total of $7.9 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the US Department of Defense. The two teams will build what is, in essence, an artificial immune system.
DOE/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
NRL researchers develop novel method to synthesize nanoparticles
Oxide nanoparticles have been shown to be crucial components in numerous applications to include electronic and magnetic devices, energy storage and generation, and as magnetic nanoparticles for use in magnetic resonance imaging. An important advantage of this novel method is the capability of creating bulk quantities of materials in a single step.

Contact: Daniel Parry
daniel.parry@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting
Using a new nanoscale structure, the researchers, led by electrical engineering professor Stephen Chou, increased the brightness and efficiency of LEDs made of organic materials -- flexible carbon-based sheets -- by 57 percent. The researchers also report their method should yield similar improvements in LEDs made in inorganic, silicon-based materials used most commonly today.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
2-D materials' crystalline defects key to new properties
Understanding how atoms 'glide' and 'climb' on the surface of 2-D crystals like tungsten disulphide may pave the way for researchers to develop materials with unusual or unique characteristics, according to an international team of researchers.
US Army Research Office, Robert Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
'Greener,' low-cost transistor heralds advance in flexible electronics
As tech company LG demonstrated this summer with the unveiling of its 18-inch flexible screen, the next generation of roll-up displays is tantalizingly close. Researchers are now reporting in the journal ACS Nano a new, inexpensive and simple way to make transparent, flexible transistors -- the building blocks of electronics -- that could help bring roll-up smartphones with see-through displays and other bendable gadgets to consumers in just a few years.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Immune system is key ally in cyberwar against cancer
Research by Rice University scientists who are fighting a cyberwar against cancer finds that the immune system may be a clinician's most powerful ally.
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, National Science Foundation, Tauber Family Funds

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Los Alamos researchers uncover properties in nanocomposite oxide ceramics for reactor fuel
The relationship between the termination chemistry and the dislocation structure of the interface offers potential avenues for tailoring transport properties and radiation damage resistance of oxide nanocomposites.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
Nanotubes help healing hearts keep the beat
Patches to heal pediatric heart defects are improved when infused with carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes serve as bridges for cell-to-cell electrical signals and help cells in the patches beat in sync with surrounding heart muscle.
National Institutes of Health, Welch Foundation, Texas Children's Hospital

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Future flexible electronics based on carbon nanotubes
Researchers have demonstrated a new method to improve the reliability and performance of transistors and circuits based on carbon nanotubes, a semiconductor material that has long been considered by scientists as one of the most promising successors to silicon for smaller, faster and cheaper electronic devices. The result appears in a new paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Lab on a Chip
Airway muscle-on-a-chip mimics asthma
New drugs are urgently needed to treat asthma. Hope may be on the horizon thanks to a team that has developed a human airway muscle-on-a-chip that accurately mimics the way smooth muscle contracts in the human airway, under normal circumstances and when exposed to asthma triggers. As reported in the journal Lab on a Chip, it also offers a window into the cellular and even subcellular responses within the tissue during an asthmatic event.
National Institutes of Health, Harvard SEAS

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Nanoscale
Southampton scientists grow a new challenger to graphene
A team of researchers from the University of Southampton's Optoelectronics Research Centre has developed a new way to fabricate a potential challenger to graphene.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Cell Reports
Massachusetts General study reveals gene expression patterns in pancreatic CTCs
Analysis of circulating tumor cells in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of CTCs, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to the ability to generate metastases. The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center investigators identified several different classes of pancreatic CTCs and found unexpected factors that may prove to be targets for improved treatment of the deadly tumor.
Stand Up to Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Affymetrix, Inc.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Journal of Controlled Release
New chip promising for tumor-targeting research
Researchers have developed a chip capable of simulating a tumor's 'microenvironment' and plan to use the new system to test the effectiveness of nanoparticles and drugs that target cancer.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene imperfections key to creating hypersensitive 'electronic nose'
Researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.
National Science Foundation, DOE/National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, NSF/Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
University of Minnesota electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. The discovery could have major implications for creating faster and more efficient optical devices for computation and communication.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Chemistry
New 'star' shaped molecule breakthrough
Scientists at The University of Manchester have generated a new star-shaped molecule made up of interlocking rings, which is the most complex of its kind ever created.

Contact: Aeron Haworth
aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk
44-717-788-1563
University of Manchester

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Materials
Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads
For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin 'diamond nanothreads' that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The threads have a structure that has never been seen before.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
Uncovering the forbidden side of molecules
Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have succeeded in observing the 'forbidden' infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time. These extremely weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology. The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.

Contact: Reto Caluori
reto.caluori@unibas.ch
41-612-672-495
University of Basel

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
2D Materials
Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
New research points to graphene as a flexible, low-cost touchscreen solution
New research published today in the journal Advanced Functional Materials suggests that graphene-treated nanowires could soon replace current touchscreen technology, significantly reducing production costs and allowing for more affordable, flexible displays.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
01-483-686-141
University of Surrey

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1712.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>