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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1685.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Physical Review E
Even geckos can lose their grip
Not even geckos and spiders can sit upside down forever. Nanophysics makes sure of that. Mechanics researchers at Linköping University have demonstrated this in an article just published in Physical Review E. Knowledge that can be of great industrial benefit.

Contact: Stefan Lindström
stefan.lindstrom@liu.se
46-013-281-127
Linköping University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Using sand to improve battery performance
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
International Union of Crystallography Journal
A possible pathway for inhibiting liver and colon cancer is found
A group of scientists from Spain, the UK and the United States has revealed the structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers.
National Institutes of Health, Plan Nacional of I+D, Diputación de Vizcaya

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance
A sponge-like silicon material could help lithium-ion batteries run longer on a single charge by giving the batteries' electrodes the space they need to expand without breaking.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Smart paint signals when equipment is too hot to handle
NJIT researchers have developed a paint for use in coatings and packaging that changes color when exposed to high temperatures, delivering a visual warning to people handling material or equipment with the potential to malfunction, explode, or cause burns when overheated.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UGA researchers use nanoparticles to enhance chemotherapy
University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug's ability to target and destroy cancerous cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shanta Dhar
shanta@uga.edu
706-542-1012
University of Georgia

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
The new atomic age: Building smaller, greener electronics
A University of Alberta research team is developing atom-scale, ultra-low-power computing devices to replace transistor circuits.

Contact: Bryan Alary
bryan.alary@ualberta.ca
780-492-0436
University of Alberta

Public Release: 6-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Nanojuice' could improve how doctors examine the gut
University at Buffalo researchers are developing a new imaging technique involving nanoparticles suspended in liquid to form 'nanojuice' that patients would drink. Upon reaching the small intestine, doctors would strike the nanoparticles with a harmless laser light, providing an unparalleled, non-invasive, real-time view of the organ.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science, Institute for Creative Technologies

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
With 'ribbons' of graphene, width matters
A novel method for producing ultra-narrow ribbons of graphene and then tuning the material's electrical properties holds promise for use in nano-devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lian Li
lianli@uwm.edu
414-229-5108
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science
Columbia researchers observe tunable quantum behavior in bilayer graphene
Columbia researchers have observed the fractional quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene and shown that this exotic state of matter can be tuned by an electric field.
Department of Defense, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, DARPA

Contact: Beth Kwon
byk2102@columbia.edu
212-854-6581
Columbia University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nature
A million times better
Nonlinear optical materials are widely used in laser systems. However, high light intensity and long propagation are required to produce strong nonlinear optical effects. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and the Technische Universitaet Muenchen created metamaterials with a million times stronger nonlinear optical response, compared to the traditional nonlinear materials, and demonstrated frequency conversion in films 100 times thinner than human hair using light intensity comparable to that of a laser pointer.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nanoscale
Making dreams come true: Making graphene from plastic?
A carbon material is developed without artificial defects commonly found during the production process of graphene while maintaining its original characteristics.
Korea Institute of Science and Technology

Contact: Dr. Han-Ik Joh
hijoh@kist.re.kr
82-102-732-5608
Korea Institute of Science and Technology

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Superconducting-silicon qubits
Theorists propose a way to make superconducting quantum devices such as Josephson junctions and qubits, atom-by-atom, inside a silicon crystal. Such systems could combine the most promising aspects of silicon spin qubits with the flexibility of superconducting circuits.
Laboratory for Physical Sciences

Contact: Phillip Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
UH chemical engineer makes device fabrication easier, thanks to NSF grant
University of Houston chemical and biomolecular engineer Gila Stein received a $279,411, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation to build models that can explain the complex physical and chemical reactions that take place in lithography systems used for device fabrication.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Audrey Grayson
aagrayson@uh.edu
713-743-4217
University of Houston

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New NIST metamaterial gives light a one-way ticket
NIST researchers have built a silver, glass and chromium nanostructure that can all but stop visible light cold in one direction while giving it a pass in the other. The device could someday play a role in optical information processing and in novel biosensing schemes.

Contact: Mark Esser
mark.esser@nist.gov
301-975-8735
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Carnegie awarded $10 million for innovative energy research
The Department of Energy has awarded Carnegie $10 million over four years for basic research that could lead to the discovery of new energy materials through its program to support Energy Frontier Research Centers. The Carnegie center, Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments, will be headquartered at Carnegie's Geophysical Laboratory and directed by Russell J. Hemley.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Russell Hemley
rhemley@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
NREL bolsters batteries with nanotubes
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory are turning to extremely tiny tubes and rods to boost power and durability in lithium-ion batteries, the energy sources for cell phones, laptops, and electric vehicles. If successful, the batteries will last longer and perform better, leading to a cost advantage for electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on command
A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated a class of walking 'bio-bots' powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nanotechnology for a sustainable future, new book offers insights
A newly released book, Nanotechnology Environmental Health and Safety: Risk, Regulation and Management, offers insights into how these new technologies may be applied to build a sustainable future and provides practical strategies for identifying and mitigating the potential risks that accompany emerging nanotechnology.

Contact: Ishani Hewage
ishanih@umich.edu
734-249-3723
University of Michigan Risk Science Center

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
How do ants get around? Ultra-sensitive machines measure their every step…
How do ants manage to move so nimbly whilst coordinating three pairs of legs and a behind that weighs up to 60 percent of their body mass? German scientists have recently developed a device that may reveal the answer and could even help design micro-robots in the future.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study helps unlock mystery of high-temp superconductors
A Binghamton University physicist and his colleagues say they have unlocked one key mystery surrounding high-temperature superconductivity. Their research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found a remarkable phenomenon in copper-oxide (cuprate) high-temperature superconductors. Michael Lawler, assistant professor of physics at Binghamton, is part of an international team of physicists with an ongoing interest in the mysterious pseudogap phase, the phase situated between insulating and superconducting phases in the cuprate phase diagram.

Contact: Ryan Yarosh
ryarosh@binghamton.edu
607-777-2174
Binghamton University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Cellular team players
Many enzymes work only with a co-trainer, of sorts. Scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and the Cluster of Excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich show what this kind of cooperation looks like in detail using a novel methodology applied to the heat shock protein Hsp90.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Researchers unzip nanotubes by shooting them at 15,000 mph
Rice University scientists discover they can unzip nanotubes into graphene nanoribbons without chemicals by firing them at a target at 15,000 miles per hour.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Interlayer distance in graphite oxide gradually changes when water is added
Physicists from Umeå University and Humboldt University in Berlin have solved a mystery that has puzzled scientists for half a century. They show with the help of powerful microscopes that the distance between graphite oxide layers gradually increases when water molecules are added. That is because the surface of graphite oxide is not flat, but varies in thickness with 'hills' and 'valleys' of nanosize. The new findings are published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Contact: Alexandr Talyzin
alexandr.talyzin@physics.umu.se
46-907-866-320
Umea University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
ACS Nano
Silver in the washing machine
The antibacterial properties of silver-coated textiles are popular in the fields of sport and medicine. A team at Empa has now investigated how different silver coatings behave in the washing machine, and they have discovered something important: textiles with nano-coatings release fewer nano-particles into the washing water than those with normal coatings.

Contact: Cornelia Zogg
cornelia.zogg@empa.ch
41-587-654-599
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1685.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>