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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1755.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information
Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and Forschungszentrum Jülich together with a colleague at the French CNRS in Strasbourg have found a new way to electrically read out the orientation of magnetic vortices in nanodisks. Their method relies on measuring characteristic microwaves emanating from the vortices. Knowledge about these signals could be used for constructing extremely small components for novel memory technology or wireless data transmission. The results are published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Materials
The rub with friction
In a new paper in Nature Materials, Brandeis University professor Zvonomir Dogic and his lab explored friction at the microscopic level. They discovered that the force generating friction is much stronger than previously thought. The discovery is an important step toward understanding the physics of the cellular and molecular world and designing the next generation of microscopic and nanotechnologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@brandeis.edu
781-736-4027
Brandeis University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New nanodevice defeats drug resistance
A nanodevice from MIT researchers can disable drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nanoscale
Glass coating improves battery performance
Researchers in the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside have investigated a strategy to prevent this 'polysulfide shuttling' phenomenon by creating nano-sized sulfur particles, and coating them in silica, otherwise known as glass.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
ACS Nano
Colon + septic tank = unique, at times stinky, study
What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Advanced Healthcare Materials
Pens filled with high-tech inks for do-it-yourself sensors
A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. The team from the University of California, San Diego, developed high-tech inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They tested the sensors to measure glucose and pollution.

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Smart crystallization
The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This 'smart material' is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Councils UK, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
American Physical Society 2015 March Meeting
International research partnership tricks the light fantastic
A manipulation of light through tiny technology could lead to big benefits for everything from TVs to microscopes.
Australian Research Council, Hanna Fellowship, University of Cincinnati Research Council

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Chemistry of Materials
Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum
Aerogels made of graphene nanoribbons and modified with boron and nitrogen are more efficient catalysts for fuel cells and air-metal batteries than expensive platinum is, according to researchers at Rice University.
The Welch Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Army Research Office/Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, and others

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Breakthrough in OLED technology
A new study from a team of researchers in California and Japan shows that organic light emitting diodes made with finely patterned structures can produce bright, low-power light sources, a key step toward making organic lasers. The results are reported in a paper appearing this week on the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
ACS Nano
Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer
Researchers have long sought an efficient way to untangle DNA to study its structure -- neatly unraveled and straightened out -- under a microscope. Now, researchers at KU Leuven have devised a simple and effective solution: they inject genetic material into a droplet of water and use a pipet tip to drag it over a glass plate covered with a sticky polymer.

Contact: Johan Hofkens
johan.hofkens@chem.kuleuven.be
32-163-27804
KU Leuven

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Science Advances
CWRU researchers bring clean energy a step closer
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have made an inexpensive metal-free catalyst that performs as well as costly metal catalysts at speeding the oxygen reduction reaction in an acidic fuel cell, and is more durable. The catalyst is made of sheets of nitrogen-doped graphene that provides great surface area, carbon nanotubes that enhance conductivity, and carbon black particles that separate the layers allowing the electrolyte and oxygen to flow freely, which greatly increased performance and efficiency.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Looking into the light
Jon Schuller, professor of electrical and computer engineering, receives an NSF CAREER award to investigate the interactions between light and organic materials.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Moving molecule writes letters
High performance materials for gas storage, thermal insulators or nanomachines need a thorough understanding of the behavior of the material down to the molecular level. Thermodynamics, which have been developed two hundred years ago to increase the efficiency of steam engines, typically observes and averages over a large number of molecules. Now a team of scientists has developed a methodology, to investigate the equilibrium thermodynamics of single molecules.
European Research Council, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Physical Review Letters
New research signals big future for quantum radar
A prototype quantum radar that has the potential to detect objects which are invisible to conventional systems has been developed by an international research team led by a quantum information scientist at the University of York.
Leverhulme Trust, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Scientific Reports
The building blocks of the future defy logic
Wake up in the morning and stretch; your midsection narrows. Pull on a rubber band and it becomes thinner. One might assume that materials will always stretch and thin. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider when stretched. After confounding scientists for decades, University of Malta researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials, unlocking applications from better skin grafts to new smart materials.
University of Malta, Malta Council for Science and Technology

Contact: Edward Duca
edward.duca@um.edu.mt
356-992-39974
University of Malta

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Journal of Medical Ethics
Study shows troubling rise in use of animals in experiments
Despite industry claims of reduced animal use as well as federal laws and policies aimed at reducing the use of animals, the number of animals used in leading US laboratories increased a staggering 73 percent from 1997 to 2012, according to a new study by PETA to be published Feb. 25 11:30 p.m. UK time in the peer-reviewed Journal of Medical Ethics, the world's leading bioethics journal.

Contact: Tasgola Bruner
tasgolab@peta.org
404-907-4172
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Advanced Energy Materials
Magnetic nanoparticles enhance performance of solar cells
Magnetic nanoparticles can increase the performance of solar cells made from polymers -- provided the mix is right. This is the result of an X-ray study at DESY's synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. Adding about 1 percent of such nanoparticles by weight makes the solar cells more efficient, according to the findings published in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

Contact: Thomas Zoufal
presse@desy.de
49-408-998-1666
Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
ACS Nano
Cutting-edge technology optimizes cancer therapy with nanomedicine drug combinations
Designing optimized combination therapies for cancer is remarkably difficult due to the infinite possible drug dose ratios and variable patient-specific response to treatment. In a landmark advance for personalized medicine, University of California Los Angeles bioengineers have developed a novel technology that, for the first time, overcomes these challenges. By assessing phenotype, or physical biological traits as they respond to chemotherapy to drive a powerful analytics platform, the most effective and safe drug combinations possible can be systematically designed.

Contact: Brianna Aldrich
baldrich@dentistry.ucla.edu
310-206-0835
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
ACS Nano
Together, nanotechnology and genetic interference may tackle 'untreatable' brain tumors
There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. Now a new Tel Aviv University study may offer hope to the tens of thousands diagnosed with gliomas every year, using a nanomedical treatment first engineered to tackle ovarian cancer tumors.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Physical Review Letters
Ultra-thin nanowires can trap electron 'twisters' that disrupt superconductors
Superconductor materials carry electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled by tiny tornado-like formations of electrons called vortices. To keep supercurrents flowing, scientists have figured out how to constrain troublesome vortices by trapping them within extremely short, ultra-thin nanowires.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-997-9907
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
International Journal of Energy Optimization and Engineering
Detecting defects at the nanoscale will profit solar panel production
Research at the University of Huddersfield will lead to major efficiency gains and cost savings in the manufacture of flexible solar panels. The project is called NanoMend and is funded by the EU's Framework Seven Research Programme. The goal is to develop new technologies for the detection, cleaning and repair of micro and nanoscale defects in thin films that are vital in products such as printed electronics and solar panels.
European Union

Contact: Nicola Werritt
n.c.werritt@hud.ac.uk
01-484-473-315
University of Huddersfield

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Lab on a Chip
Quick test for Ebola
Using a simple paper strip similar to a pregnancy test, MIT researchers have found a way to rapidly diagnose Ebola, as well as other viral hemorrhagic fevers such as yellow fever and dengue fever.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
Optical nanoantennas set the stage for a NEMS lab-on-a-chip revolution
Newly developed tiny antennas, likened to spotlights on the nanoscale, offer the potential to measure food safety, identify pollutants in the air and even quickly diagnose and treat cancer, according to the Australian scientists who created them. In the Journal of Applied Physics, they describe these and other envisioned applications for their nanocubes in 'laboratories-on-a-chip.'

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Chemistry
Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step
Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block -- a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be used in applications such as optical and electronic devices or smart drug-delivery systems.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Foundation for Innovation, NanoQuébec, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Fonds de recherche; du Quebec - Nature et technologies

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1755.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>