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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1775.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Lab on a Chip
Made-in-Singapore rapid test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva
Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology of A*STAR has developed a paper-based disposable device that will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.
Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

Contact: Nidyah Sani
nidyah@ibn.a-star.edu.sg
65-682-47005
Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency.

Contact: Vanessa Wood
wood@iis.ee.ethz.ch
41-446-326-654
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Award-winning research on DNA probes just published in Canadian Journal of Chemistry
The 2014 Fred Beamish Award was awarded to professor Juewen Liu (Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo). The Award Lecture titled 'Lanthanide-dependent RNA-cleaving DNAzymes as metal biosensors' is published today in the Canadian Journal of Chemistry.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@cdnsciencepub.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA/Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Physics
Researchers use sound to slow down, speed up, and block light
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced Transparency (BSIT), which can be used to slow down, speed up, and block light in an optical waveguide. The BSIT phenomenon permits light to travel in the forward direction while light traveling in the backward direction is strongly absorbed. This non-reciprocal behavior is essential for building isolators and circulators.
University of Illinois, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office for Scientific Research

Contact: Gaurav Bahl
bahl@illinois.edu
217-300-2194
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
CWRU researcher on the clock to improve early Ebola detection
To reduce or eliminate false positive results from the quickest and most sensitive Ebola test, researchers will make a positive control for processing Ebola DNA. The control will be made of non-infectious sequences of Ebola Virus nucleic acid tucked inside a plant virus' protective protein shell.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
ORNL researchers tune friction in ionic solids at the nanoscale
Experiments conducted by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered a way of controlling friction on ionic surfaces at the nanoscale using electrical stimulation and ambient water vapor.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Engineer receives NSF CAREER award for nanotechnology research, educational outreach
Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering at Kansas State University, has received a $500,000 National Science Foundation CAREER award for his nanotechnology research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gurpreet Singh
gurpreet@k-state.edu
785-532-7085
Kansas State University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
ACS Nano
Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors. The experiment is the first to show that these micromotors can operate safely in a living animal.

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Science
New pathway to valleytronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have uncovered a promising new pathway to valleytronics, a potential quantum computing technology in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2-D semiconductors.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Chinese government awards INRS professor Federico Rosei
Professor Federico Rosei of the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre has won the Chang Jiang Scholars Award, a highly prestigious distinction for world-class researchers given by the Chinese government. Professor Rosei was honored for his work in the field of organic and inorganic nanomaterials. This is the first time the award has been given to an INRS faculty member.

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
INRS

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
The laser pulse that gets shorter all by itself
A new method of creating ultra short laser pulses has been created: Just by sending a pulse through a cleverly designed fiber, it can be compressed by a factor of 20.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Advanced Materials
Carbon nanoballs can greatly contribute to sustainable energy supply
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have discovered that the insulation plastic used in high-voltage cables can withstand a 26 percent higher voltage if nanometer-sized carbon balls are added. This could result in enormous efficiency gains in the power grids of the future, which are needed to achieve a sustainable energy system.
Chalmers University of Technology/Materials Science Area of Advance, Chalmers University of Technology/Energy Area of Advance, Borealis AB

Contact: Johanna Wilde
johanna.wilde@chalmers.se
46-317-722-029
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Researchers at Penn, UC Berkeley and Illinois use oxides to flip graphene conductivity
A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania; University of California, Berkeley; and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has demonstrated a new way to change the amount of electrons that reside in a given region within a piece of graphene, they have a proof-of-principle in making the fundamental building blocks of semiconductor devices using the 2-D material.
Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
ACS Nano
Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers
Nature has many examples of self-assembly, and bioengineers are interested in copying these systems to create useful new materials or devices. Amyloid proteins, for example, can self-assemble into the tangled plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease -- but can also form very useful materials, such as spider silk, or biofilms around living cells. Researchers at UC Davis and Rice University have now come up with methods to manipulate natural proteins so that they self-assemble into amyloid fibrils.
UC Davis RISE

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Chromium-centered cycloparaphenylene rings for making functionalized nanocarbons
A team of chemists at Nagoya University has synthesized novel transition metal-complexed cycloparaphenylenes (CPPs) that enable selective monofunctionalization of CPPs for the first time, opening doors to the construction of unprecedented nanocarbons.

Contact: Dr. Ayako Miyazaki
press@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp
81-527-894-999
Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age
As nanomachine design advances, researchers are moving from wondering if the nanomachine works to how long it will work -- an important question as there are so many potential applications, e.g., for medical uses including drug delivery and early diagnosis. Columbia Engineering Professor Henry Hess observed a molecular shuttle powered by kinesin motor proteins and found it to degrade when operating, marking the first time degradation has been studied in detail in an active, autonomous nanomachine.
National Science Foundation, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Labs

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Optica
Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers
A team of scientists has developed, for the first time, a microscopic component that is small enough to fit onto a standard silicon chip that can generate a continuous supply of entangled photons.

Contact: Jack Hanley
jh@ecius.net
202-296-2002
The Optical Society

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Nanoscale
The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made
Rice University theorists show it may be possible to tune graphene edges by varying heat and force as graphene is fractured. Edge configurations affect graphene's electronic and mechanical properties, which are important for applications.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, NASA

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Nano Letters
Silver nanowires demonstrate unexpected self-healing mechanism
Northwestern University researchers find that silver nanowires can withstand strong cyclic loads, which is a key attribute needed for flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Advanced Functional Materials
New technique helps probe performance of organic solar cell materials
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the role that a material's structure has on the efficiency of organic solar cells, which are candidates for low-cost, next generation solar power. The researchers used the technique to determine that materials with a highly organized structure at the nanoscale are not more efficient at creating free electrons than poorly organized structures -- a finding which will guide future research and development efforts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists 'bend' elastic waves with new metamaterials that could have commercial applications
Sound waves passing through the air, objects that break a body of water and cause ripples, or shockwaves from earthquakes all are considered 'elastic' waves. These waves travel at the surface or through a material without causing any permanent changes to the substance's makeup. Now, engineering researchers at the University of Missouri have developed a material that has the ability to control these waves, creating possible medical, military and commercial applications with the potential to greatly benefit society.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
VCU researcher receives NSF grant to extend lifespan of Li-ion batteries
A Virginia Commonwealth University professor has received a five-year, $505,000 award from the National Science Foundation to make lithium-ion batteries -- which power electric vehicles and portable electronic devices -- far more efficient, sustainable and environmentally friendly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian McNeill
bwmcneill@vcu.edu
804-827-0889
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
What is the current development in nanomedicine for clinical diagnosis and treatment?
Nanomedicine has been advancing rapidly, particularly in the development of novel nano tools for medicine. This requires multiple nano functionalities for cell targeting, drug storage, optical imaging, and effective treatment. 'Bio-inspired Nanomaterials and Devices' summarizes the most recent developments in nanomaterials, biotechnology, and medical diagnosis and therapy for researchers from diverse fields of chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering, biology, and medicine. Not only does the book touch up on the most fundamental topics, but also deal with critical clinical issues.

Contact: Jason CJ
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
HiSIM-SOTB, compact transistor model, selected as international industry standard
A new compact transistor model was developed and the framework for realizing a faster design support process and product development for integrated circuits in the ultra-low voltage category was established. This new compact model, HiSIM-SOTB (Hiroshima University STARC IGFET Model Silicon-on-Thin BOX), was selected as an international industry standard during a meeting in Washington D.C., which was held by the Compact Modeling Coalition of the Silicon Integration Initiative.

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1775.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>