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Portal: Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1650.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science
When nanotechnology meets quantum physics in 1 dimension
Scientists from McGill University and Sandia National Laboratories have succeeded in conducting a new experiment that supports the existence of the long-sought-after Luttinger liquid state. Their findings, published in the Jan. 23 issue of Science Express, validate important predictions of the Luttinger liquid model.
US Department of Energy, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Fonds de recherche du Québec -- Nature et technologies

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Scientific Reports
Detecting chemicals, measuring strain with a pencil and paper
A team of Northwestern University students has proven that pencils and regular office paper can be used to measure strain on an object and detect hazardous gases.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling microprocessors with carbon nanotubes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have developed a "process friendly" technique to enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through the use of carbon nanotubes.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Intel Corporation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nano Letters
Atomic-scale catalysts may produce cheap hydrogen
Researchers at North Carolina State University have shown that a one-atom thick film of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) may work as an effective catalyst for creating hydrogen. The work opens a new door for the production of cheap hydrogen.
US Army Research Office

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
From a carpet of nanorods to a thin film solar cell absorber within a few seconds
Research teams at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and at the University of Limerick, Ireland, have discovered a novel solid state reaction which lets kesterite grains grow within a few seconds and at relatively low temperatures. For this reaction, they exploit a transition from a metastable wurtzite compound in the form of nanorods to the more stable kesterite compound. At the EDDI Beamline at BESSY II, the scientists could observe this process in real-time when heating the sample: in a few seconds Kesterite grains formed.

Contact: Dr. Roland Mainz
roland.mainz@helmholtz-berlin.de
49-030-806-242-737
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Journal of Non-Linear Dynamics
Researcher proves mass important at nano-scale, matters in calculations and measurements
A University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor has proven that the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements at the sub-micrometer scale.

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Live feed into our bodies
A device that can monitor the levels of specific drugs as they flow through the bloodstream may soon take the guesswork out of drug dosing and allow physicians to tailor prescriptions to their patients' specific biology. Developed by UC Santa Barbara researchers Tom Soh, Kevin Plaxco and Scott Ferguson, the biosensor combines engineering and biochemistry and has far-reaching potential.

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Liquid crystal turns water droplets into 'gemstones,' Penn materials research shows
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Swarthmore College describe new research into a type of liquid crystal that dissolves in water rather than avoids it as do the oily liquid crystals found in displays. This property means that these liquid crystals hold potential for biomedical applications, where their changing internal patterns could signal the presence of specific proteins or other biological macromolecules.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers model macroscale plasmonic convection to control fluid and particle motion
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new theoretical model that explains macroscale fluid convection induced by plasmonic (metal) nanostructures. This work is the first to establish both theoretically and experimentally that micron/s fluid velocities can be generated using a plasmonic architecture, and provides important insight into the flows affecting particle dynamics in plasmonic optical trapping experiments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kimani Toussaint
ktoussai@illinois.edu
217-244-4088
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
E-whiskers
Researchers with Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have created e-whiskers -- highly sensitive tactile sensors made from carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles that should have a wide range of applications including advanced robotics, human-machine interfaces, and biological and environmental sensors.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL working to clean air in fracking process
A microbe capable of digesting methane could save countless tons of greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere during the hydraulic fracturing process. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, uses pressurized water to fracture rock to release natural gas. It's been a boon to local economies and a source of inexpensive fuels -- but if nothing is done to capture the byproduct methane, which is typically flared in the air, it can also contribute heftily to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL model licensed to improve accuracy of battery simulations
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has licensed its Equivalent Circuit Battery Model to software developer ThermoAnalytics for use in its recently updated RadTherm software package.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
New transparent display system could provide heads-up data
Transparent displays have a variety of potential applications -- such as the ability to see navigation or dashboard information while looking through the windshield of a car or plane, or to project video onto a window or a pair of eyeglasses.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Staying cool in the nanoelectric universe by getting hot
As smartphones, tablets and other gadgets become smaller and more sophisticated, the heat they generate while in use increases. This is a growing problem because it can cause the electronics inside the gadgets to fail. Conventional wisdom suggests the solution is to keep the guts of these gadgets cool. But a new University at Buffalo research paper hints at the opposite.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Peekaboo... I see through!
A team from the MIT and Harvard departments of Physics, and the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, has developed a new approach to produce transparent projection screens. Their result paves the way for a new class of transparent displays with many attractive features, including wide viewing angle, scalability to large size, and low cost.
Army Research Office, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, National Science Foundation

Contact: Chia Wei Hsu
cwhsu@MIT.EDU
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Novel nanotherapy breakthrough may help reduce recurrent heart attacks and stroke
New report in Nature Communications by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai shows their new statin nanotherapy can target high-risk inflammation inside heart arteries that causes heart attacks or stroke.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Contact: Lauren Woods
lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
212-241-2836
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Solar-power device would use heat to enhance efficiency
New approach developed at MIT could generate power from sunlight efficiently and on demand.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Tiny swimming bio-bots boldly go where no bot has swum before
The alien world of aquatic micro-organisms just got new residents: synthetic self-propelled swimming bio-bots. A team of University of Illinois engineers has developed a class of tiny bio-hybrid machines that swim like sperm, the first synthetic structures that can traverse the viscous fluids of biological environments on their own.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Enhancing bioavailability of healthful components in food using nanoparticle design
"In the last decade, knowledge has been advancing about how to effectively deliver beneficial components in food. This research will allow us to direct the assembly of nano-emulsion droplets to create characteristics that will dictate how they are digested and absorbed," Xiao explains. "This would be a model for nutraceutical delivery in a wide range of food products. Someday prepared foods may help lower our risk of cancer, for example."
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Science
Natural 3-D counterpart to graphene discovered
A natural 3-D counterpart to 2-D graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity has been discovered at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source. This discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers 'detune' a molecule
Rice University scientists discover they can control the bonds between atoms in a molecule.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Nanoscale
Silver nanowire sensors hold promise for prosthetics, robotics
North Carolina State University researchers have used silver nanowires to develop wearable, multifunctional sensors that could be used in biomedical, military or athletic applications, including new prosthetics, robotic systems and flexible touch panels. The sensors can measure strain, pressure, human touch and bioelectronic signals such as electrocardiograms.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Nanotechnology
Carbon nanotube sponge shows improved water clean-up
A carbon nanotube sponge capable of soaking up water contaminants, such as fertilisers, pesticides and pharmaceuticals, more than three times more efficiently than previous efforts has been presented in a new study published today.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Nature Chemistry
2-proton bit controlled by a single copper atom
Just a single foreign atom located in the vicinity of a molecule can change spatial arrangement of its atoms. In a spectacular experiment, an international team of researchers was able to change persistently positions of the nuclei of hydrogen atoms in a porphycene molecule by approaching a single copper atom to the molecule.

Contact: Jacek Waluk
jwaluk@ichf.edu.pl
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Europhysics Letters
A deeper look at interfaces
A technique developed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source makes it possible for the first time to selectively study the electronic structure of buried interfaces in multilayer nanodevices. The technique is called Standing Wave Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1650.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>