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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1878.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Chemistry of Materials
Ensuring the future affordability of wind turbines, computers and electric cars
Technologies from wind turbines to electric vehicles rely on critical materials called rare-earth elements. These elements, though often abundant, can be difficult and increasingly costly to come by. Now, scientists looking for alternatives have reported in ACS' journal Chemistry of Materials a new way to make nanoparticles that could replace some rare-earth materials and help ensure the continued supply of products people have come to depend on.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
Nanocars taken for a rough ride
Rice University and North Carolina State University researchers characterize how single-molecule nanocars move in open air. The research will help the kinetics of molecular machines in ambient conditions over time.
National Science Foundation, North Carolina State University

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Journal of Applied Physics
Tiny probe could produce big improvements in batteries and fuel cells
The key to needed improvements in the quest for better batteries and fuels cells likely lies in the nanoscale, a realm so tiny that the movement of a few atoms or molecules can shift the landscape. A team of American and Chinese researchers has built a new window into this world to help scientists better understand how batteries really work. They describe their nanoscale probe in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Contact: AIP Media Line
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 30-May-2016
Nature Chemistry
Seeing 'living' nanofibers in real time
Japanese scientists observe artificial nanofibers self-sorting into organized structures in real-time. This brings scientists closer toward developing intelligent, next-generation biomimics that possess the flexibility and diversity of functions that exist in a living cell.
Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Anna Ikarashi
comms@mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp
075-753-5728
Kyoto University

Public Release: 29-May-2016
The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Using solid-state materials with gold nanoantennas for more durable solar cells
Hokkaido University scientists are testing the development of solar cells made of solid materials to improve their ability to function under harsh environmental conditions.
The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan, Hokkaido University/Nanotechnology Platform, Nano-Macro Materials, Devicesand System Research Alliance of MEXT

Contact: Hiroaki MISAWA
misawa@es.hokudai.ac.jp
Hokkaido University

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Science
Automating DNA origami opens door to many new uses
MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for building DNA nanoparticles automatically, paving the way to many more applications for 'DNA origami.'

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Cyborgs closer to becoming a reality of human evolution
Our excitement with and rapid uptake of technology -- and the growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement -- are putting humans more firmly on the path to becoming cyborgs, according to evolution experts from the University of Adelaide.

Contact: Maciej Henneberg
maciej.henneberg@adelaide.edu.au
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Science Advances
Simple attraction: Researchers control protein release from nanoparticles without encapsulation
A U of T Engineering team has designed a simpler way to keep therapeutic proteins where they are needed for long periods of time. The discovery is a potential game-changer for the treatment of chronic illnesses or injuries that often require multiple injections or daily pills.

Contact: Marit Mitchell
marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca
416-978-4498
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Physical Review Letters
Engineers discover a new gatekeeper for light
Imagine a device that is selectively transparent to various wavelengths of light at one moment, and opaque to them the next, following a minute adjustment. Researchers report a discovery that brings us one step closer to this imagined future.

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Archives of Toxicology
PETA science group publishes a review on pulmonary effects of nanomaterials
A scientist from the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. is the lead author of a review on pulmonary fibrosis that results from inhaling nanomaterials, which has been published in Archives of Toxicology. The coauthors are scientists from Health Canada, West Virginia University, and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland.

Contact: Tasgola Bruner
tasgolab@peta.org
404-907-4172
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Public Release: 26-May-2016
eLife
Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription
Gene transcription is the process by which DNA is copied and synthesized as messenger RNA (mRNA) -- which delivers its genetic blueprints to the cell's protein-making machinery. Now researchers at MIT and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have identified a hidden, ephemeral phenomenon in cells that may play a major role in jump-starting mRNA production and regulating gene transcription.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Construction and Building Materials
Finding a new formula for concrete
Researchers at MIT are seeking to redesign concrete -- the most widely used human-made material in the world -- by following nature's blueprints. In a paper published online in the journal Construction and Building Materials, the team contrasts cement paste -- concrete's binding ingredient -- with the structure and properties of natural materials such as bones, shells, and deep-sea sponges.
Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences through the Kuwait-MIT Center for Natural Resources and the Environment, National Institute of Standards and Technology, DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-May-2016
UH researcher recognized for work in clean energy
Debora Rodrigues, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Houston, has received the 2016 C3E Research Award. Her work focuses on developing bio- and nanotechnologies to reduce energy costs in water and wastewater treatment.

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Science
Top-down design brings new DNA structures to life
In new research appearing in the advance online edition of the journal Science, Hao Yan, along with colleagues from MIT and Baylor College of Medicine describe a new method for designing geometric forms built from DNA. They present a novel variant on a technique known as DNA origami, in which the base-pairing properties of DNA are exploited for the construction of tiny structures in 2 and 3 dimensions.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-May-2016
Wayne State aims to improve imaging and chemical sensing of disease biomarkers
With the help of a $341,694 grant from the National Science Foundation, 'Establishing the Crystallochemical Principles Governing Energy-Transfer Processes in Upconversion Nanocrystals,' a Wayne State University researcher aims to improve upconversion nanocrystals' composition and atomic structure to expand the library of bright and multicolor upconverters, while also generating fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 25-May-2016
ACS Sensors
The next generation of carbon monoxide nanosensors
Researchers propose a new method for building gas sensors that integrates nanowires on a micro-hotplate.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 25-May-2016
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Australian cricket team uses guided missile technology to improve bowling
Australian researchers have developed a revolutionary algorithm using submarine and guided missile technology to reduce injury and improve performance in cricket fast bowlers. The 'torpedo technology' is being used by the Australian team in preparations for the upcoming Sri Lanka Series. Sports scientists at Australian Catholic University's School of Exercise Science developed the algorithm as the current manual reporting of professional cricketers' workloads -- which only measures how many deliveries a bowler balls, and not the intensity of the effort -- was inadequate.

Contact: Rajiv Maharaj
rajiv.maharaj@acu.edu.au
Australian Catholic University

Public Release: 24-May-2016
Top international award for UNSW Australia quantum computing chief
For her world-leading research in the fabrication of atomic-scale devices for quantum computing, UNSW Australia's Michelle Simmons has been awarded a prestigious Foresight Institute Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology. Professor Simmons is director of the UNSW-based Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-478-492-060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 24-May-2016
Nature Communications
Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials
Now, a team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere say they have made significant inroads toward understanding a process for improving perovskites' performance, by modifying the material using intense light. The new findings are being reported in the journal Nature Communications, in a paper by Samuel Stranks, a researcher at MIT; Vladimir Bulovic, the Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Professor of Emerging Technology and associate dean for innovation; and eight colleagues at other institutions in the US and the UK.
European Union, National Science Foundation, Center for Excitonics, US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ivy's powerful grasp could lead to better medical adhesives, stronger battle armor
English ivy's natural glue might hold the key to new approaches to wound healing, stronger armor for the military and maybe even cosmetics with better staying power.
US Army, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mingjun Zhang
Zhang.4882@osu.edu
614-292-3181
Ohio State University

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Physical Review A
Dartmouth team creates new method to control quantum systems
Dartmouth College researchers have discovered a method to design faster pulses, offering a new way to accurately control quantum systems.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 23-May-2016
EPJ E
Traveling wave drives magnetic particles
As our technology downsizes, scientists often operate in microscopic-scale jungles, where modern-day explorers develop new methods for transporting microscopic objects of different sizes across non uniform environments, without losing them. Now, Pietro Tierno and Arthur Straube from the University of Barcelona, Spain, have developed a new method for selectively controlling the aggregation or disaggregation of magnetically interacting particles of two distinct sizes in suspension in a liquid and published their results in Springer's EPJ E.
ERC Starting Grant, Mineco, Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca

Contact: Sabine Lehr
sabine.lehr@springer.com
49-622-148-78336
Springer

Public Release: 23-May-2016
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties
Rice University scientists have modified their graphene-based de-icer to resist the formation of ice well below the freezing point and added superhydrophobic capabilities. The robust film is intended for use in extreme environments as well as on aircraft, power lines and ships.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 23-May-2016
KIT brings outstanding experimental physicist back to Germany
Germany's award in the highest amount for researchers from abroad was handed over to Professor Wolfgang Wernsdorfer May 3 in Berlin. The pioneer of molecular spin electronics will now return from France to Germany: From June 1, 2016, Wernsdorfer will continue his research for the development of future quantum computers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.
German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Scientific Reports
Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis
Scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College have designed an optically active nanosized supercrystal whose novel architecture can help separate organic molecules, thus considerably facilitating the technology of drug synthesis. The study was published in Scientific Reports.
Ministry of Education, Science of the Russian Federation, Dynasty Foundation Support Program for Physicists, Science Foundation Ireland

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
dvmalkov@corp.ifmo.ru
7-953-377-5508
ITMO University

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1878.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>