News Tips from ACS NANO DOE Research News Site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-May-2016 01:59
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Options

Portal Home

Glossary

Background Articles

Research Papers

Meetings

Links & Resources

Essays

Online Chats

RSS Feed

Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1845.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Science
A metal that behaves like water
In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Harvard and Raytheon BBN Technology have made a breakthrough in our understanding of graphene's basic properties, observing for the first time electrons in a metal behaving like a fluid. This research could lead to novel thermoelectric devices as well as provide a model system to explore exotic phenomena like black holes and high-energy plasmas.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Lasers rewired': Scientists find a new way to make nanowire lasers
Scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have found a simple new way to produce nanoscale wires that can serve as bright, stable and tunable lasers -- an advance toward using light to transmit data.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Nano Letters
Silicon chip with integrated laser: Light from a nanowire
Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a nanolaser, a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Thanks to an ingenious process, the nanowire lasers grow right on a silicon chip, making it possible to produce high-performance photonic components cost-effectively. This will pave the way for fast and efficient data processing with light in the future.
DFG, IBM

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Here be dragons: Science, technology and the future of humanity
The 21st century will most likely see even more revolutionary changes than the 20th, due to advances in science, technology and medicine. The potential benefits of all these technologies are enormous, but so are the risks, including the possibility of human extinction. This book is a passionate plea for doing our best to map the territories ahead of us, and for acting with foresight.

Contact: Johanna Wilde
johanna.wilde@chalmers.se
46-317-722-029
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Science
Research reveals carbon films can give microchips energy storage capability
After more than half a decade of speculation, fabrication, modeling and testing, an international team of researchers led by Drexel University's Dr. Yury Gogotsi and Dr. Patrice Simon of Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse, France, have confirmed that their process for making carbon films and micro-supercapacitors will allow microchips and their power sources to become one and the same.

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
ACS Nano
Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature
From dot-matrix to 3-D, printing technology has come a long way in 40 years. But all of these technologies have created hues by using dye inks, which can be taxing on the environment. Now a team reports in ACS Nano the development of a colorless, non-toxic ink for use in inkjet printers. Instead of relying on dyes, the team exploits the nanostructure of this ink to create color on a page with inkjet printing.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology
In a new study, Hao Yan, director of the Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute presents a clever means of localizing and confining enzymes and the substrate molecules they bind with, speeding up reactions essential for life processes.

Contact: Richard Harth
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices
An engineering research team at the University of Alberta has invented a new transistor that could revolutionize thin-film electronic devices. Their findings, published in Nature Communications, could open the door to the development of flexible electronic devices with applications as wide-ranging as display technology to medical imaging and renewable energy production. The transistor is easily scaled and has power-handling capabilities at least 10 times greater than commercially produced thin film transistors.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, University of Alberta

Contact: Richard Cairney
richard.cairney@ualberta.ca
780-492-4514
University of Alberta

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Acta Crystallographica Section A
Twisted X-rays unravel the complexity of helical structures
Since the discovery of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals just over 100 years ago, X-ray diffraction as a method of structure determination has dominated structural research in materials science and biology. However, many of the most important materials whose structures remain unknown do not readily crystallize as three-dimensional periodic structures.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Partnerships for International Research and Education, Office of Navel Research, MURI Program

Contact: D.r Jonathan K. Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Making sense of metallic glass
Vitrified metals, or metallic glasses, are at the frontier of materials science research. But much about them remains poorly understood. A team is trying to figure out the rules that govern metallic glass's creation. They are doing this by looking at metallic glasses under extreme pressures. High-pressure research can be used to probe structure on an atomic level and understand a material's state of order or disorder.

Contact: Qiaoshi "Charles" Zeng
qzeng@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineers 3-D-print a new lifelike liver tissue for drug screening
A team led by engineers at the University of California, San Diego has 3-D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. The new model could be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling. Researchers said the advance could help pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs. The work was published the week of Feb. 8 in the online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles
Scientists have created a crystal structure that boosts the interaction between tiny bursts of light and individual electrons, an advance that could be a significant step toward establishing quantum networks in the future.

Contact: Edo Waks
edowaks@ece.umd.edu
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes
Pollens, the bane of allergy sufferers, could represent a boon for battery makers: Recent research has suggested their potential use as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: emil venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
The iron stepping stones to better wearable tech without semiconductors
The way to better wearable electronics is dotted with iron steppingstones. Check out how Michigan Tech researcher Yoke Khin Yap's nanotubes bridge the gap with quantum tunneling.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Yoke Khin Yap
ykyap@mtu.edu
906-487-2900
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories
Scientists have for the first time reengineered a building block of a geometric nanocompartment that occurs naturally in bacteria to give it a new function.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Stanford's GCEP awards $7.6 million for energy research
The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University has awarded $7.6 million for research on advanced energy technologies for industrialized countries and the developing world. The funding will be shared by six research teams at Stanford and three other universities.
Global Climate and Energy Project, Stanford University

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Physical Review Letters
A fast solidification process makes material crackle
Researchers from the Centre of Excellence in Computational Nanoscience at Aalto University and their colleagues at Brown University and the University of California, Irvine, have developed a theory that answers this question by combining for the first time the understanding of vibrations in solid material and the solidification of liquid at a microscopic level. The results were published in the renowned scientific publication Physical Review Letters in January.

Contact: Vili Heinonen
vili.heinonen@aalto.fi
358-504-332-834
Aalto University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Science
Scientists guide gold nanoparticles to form 'diamond' superlattices
Using bundled strands of DNA to build Tinkertoy-like tetrahedral cages, scientists have devised a way to trap and arrange nanoparticles in a way that mimics the crystalline structure of diamond. The achievement of this complex yet elegant arrangement may open a path to new materials that take advantage of the optical and mechanical properties of this crystalline structure for applications such as optical transistors, color-changing materials, and lightweight yet tough materials.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Nanomedicine
Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment
UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research.
National Institutes of Health, Academia Sinica

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
IUPUI chemist receives $1.1 million for research, training of future minority researchers
Supported by an NSF CAREER award, Lisa M. Jones of IUPUI is developing a novel approach to study of cell membrane proteins in their native cellular environment -- work fundamental to gaining a better understanding of protein misfolding, which has been linked to life-limiting human diseases including cystic fibrosis. Her work provides state-of-the-art research training for undergraduate students from historically black colleges and universities as well as both undergraduate and graduate students from IUPUI.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
International Solid-State Circuits Conference
Researchers develop hack-proof RFID chips
Researchers at MIT and Texas Instruments have developed a new type of radio frequency identification (RFID) chip that is virtually impossible to hack. If such chips were widely adopted, it could mean that an identity thief couldn't steal your credit card number or key card information by sitting next to you at a café, and high-tech burglars couldn't swipe expensive goods from a warehouse and replace them with dummy tags.
Denso

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
APL Materials
Researchers discover new phase of boron nitride and a new way to create pure c-BN
Researchers have discovered a new phase of the material boron nitride, which has potential applications for both manufacturing tools and electronic displays. The researchers have also developed a new technique for creating cubic boron nitride (c-BN) at ambient temperatures and air pressure, which has a suite of applications, including the development of advanced power grid technologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Heliophysics CubeSat to launch on NASA's SLS
Just a bit bigger than a box of cereal, one of the first CubeSats to travel in interplanetary space will be NASA's miniature space science station, dedicated to studying the dynamic particles and magnetic fields that stream from the sun.
NASA

Contact: Karen Fox
Karen.c.fox@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
NASA's ICESat-2 equipped with unique 3-D manufactured part
NASA's follow-on to the successful ICESat mission will employ a never-before-flown technique for determining the topography of ice sheets and the thickness of sea ice, but that won't be the only first for this mission.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
Lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Nanoscale
Novel nanoparticle made of common mineral may help keep tumor growth at bay
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Erika Ebsworth-Goold
eebsworth-goold@wustl.edu
314-935-2914
Washington University in St. Louis

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1845.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>