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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1664.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study helps unlock mystery of high-temp superconductors
A Binghamton University physicist and his colleagues say they have unlocked one key mystery surrounding high-temperature superconductivity. Their research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found a remarkable phenomenon in copper-oxide (cuprate) high-temperature superconductors. Michael Lawler, assistant professor of physics at Binghamton, is part of an international team of physicists with an ongoing interest in the mysterious pseudogap phase, the phase situated between insulating and superconducting phases in the cuprate phase diagram.

Contact: Ryan Yarosh
ryarosh@binghamton.edu
607-777-2174
Binghamton University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Cellular team players
Many enzymes work only with a co-trainer, of sorts. Scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and the Cluster of Excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich show what this kind of cooperation looks like in detail using a novel methodology applied to the heat shock protein Hsp90.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Researchers unzip nanotubes by shooting them at 15,000 mph
Rice University scientists discover they can unzip nanotubes into graphene nanoribbons without chemicals by firing them at a target at 15,000 miles per hour.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Interlayer distance in graphite oxide gradually changes when water is added
Physicists from Umeå University and Humboldt University in Berlin have solved a mystery that has puzzled scientists for half a century. They show with the help of powerful microscopes that the distance between graphite oxide layers gradually increases when water molecules are added. That is because the surface of graphite oxide is not flat, but varies in thickness with 'hills' and 'valleys' of nanosize. The new findings are published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Contact: Alexandr Talyzin
alexandr.talyzin@physics.umu.se
46-907-866-320
Umea University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
ACS Nano
Silver in the washing machine
The antibacterial properties of silver-coated textiles are popular in the fields of sport and medicine. A team at Empa has now investigated how different silver coatings behave in the washing machine, and they have discovered something important: textiles with nano-coatings release fewer nano-particles into the washing water than those with normal coatings.

Contact: Cornelia Zogg
cornelia.zogg@empa.ch
41-587-654-599
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Computational Materials Science
Scientists develop force sensor from carbon nanotubes
A group of researchers from Russia, Belarus and Spain, including Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology professor Yury Lozovik, have developed a microscopic force sensor based on carbon nanotubes. The device is described in an article published in the journal Computational Materials Science.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borisova.ao@mipt.ru
7-495-408-6445
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists engineer nanoparticles to prevent bone cancer, strengthen bones
A research collaboration between Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has utilized nanomedicine technologies to develop a drug-delivery system that can precisely target and attack cancer cells in the bone, as well as increase bone strength and volume to prevent bone cancer progression.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Clot-building nanoparticles raise survival rate following blast trauma
In preclinical tests led by a Case Western Reserve University researcher, artificial platelets, called 'hemostatic nanoparticles,' when injected after blast trauma increased survival rates to 95 percent from 60 percent, and showed no signs of interfering with healing or causing other complications weeks afterward.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Researchers create quantum dots with single-atom precision
A team of physicists from the Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik in Berlin, Germany, NTT Basic Research Laboratories in Atsugi, Japan, and the US Naval Research Laboratory has used a scanning tunneling microscope to create quantum dots with identical, deterministic sizes.

Contact: Donna McKinney
donna.mckinney@nrl.navy.mil
202-404-3322
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Physics
Bending the rules
For his doctoral dissertation in the Goldman Superconductivity Research Group at the University of Minnesota, Yu Chen, now a postdoctoral researcher at UC Santa Barbara, developed a novel way to fabricate superconducting nanocircuitry. However, the extremely small zinc nanowires he designed did some unexpected -- and sort of funky -- things.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Photonics
Single-pixel 'multiplex' captures elusive terahertz images
In an effort that advances attempts to generate images using terahertz light waves, researchers from Boston College, Duke University and the University of New Mexico report in Nature Photonics that they've developing a single-pixel 'multiplex' device that uses boutique metamaterials to capture images in the terahertz realm, which scientists say could play a crucial role in future medical and security imaging initiatives.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Diamond plates create nanostructures through pressure, not chemistry
Mechanical force -- about the same amount that raises the numerals on credit cards -- proves to be a much more varied and ecological creator of nanostructures than the current method of choice, chemistry, with its unvarying results and harmful processes.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Let there be light: Chemists develop magnetically responsive liquid crystals
University of California, Riverside chemists have constructed liquid crystals with optical properties that can be instantly and reversibly controlled by an external magnetic field. The research opens the door to display applications relying on the instantaneous and contactless nature of magnetic manipulation -- such as signage, posters, writing tablets, and billboards. Requiring no electrodes, the liquid crystals have applications in anti-counterfeit technology and optical communication devices for controlling the amplitude, phase, polarization, propagation direction of light.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Laboratory

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
NNI releases progress review on environmental, health, & safety research
The National Nanotechnology Initiative released today a Progress Review on the Coordinated Implementation of the National Nanotechnology Initiative 2011 Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Strategy, a document that demonstrates the wide range of research activities, accomplishments, and collaborations of Federal agencies working toward the responsible development of nanotechnology.

Contact: Marlowe Newman
info@nnco.nano.gov
703-292-7128
National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Eco-friendly versatile nanocapsules developed
The Institute for Basic Science has announced that the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity have succeeded in developing a new technology that introduces metal nanoparticles on the surface of polymer nanocapsules made of cucurbit[6]uril.
Institute for Basic Science

Contact: Mr. Hanbin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Shaken, not stirred -- mythical god's capsules please!
Everything depends on how you look at them. Looking from one side you will see one face; and when looking from the opposite side -- you will see a different one. So appear Janus capsules, miniature, hollow structures, in different fragments composed of different micro- and nanoparticles. Theoreticians were able to design models of such capsules, but a real challenge was to produce them. Now, Janus capsules can be produced easily and at low cost.

Contact: Dr. Zbigniew Rozynek
zrozynek@ichf.edu.pl
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
New technology to treat sepsis, a global killer
Engineers are developing a new technology that they believe could revolutionize the treatment and prevention of sepsis. This 'hidden killer' in the United States actually kills more people every year than AIDS, prostate cancer and breast cancer combined.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Adam Higgins
adam.higgins@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6245
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Physical Review Letters
Advanced light source provides new look at skyrmions
At Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers for the first time have used x-rays to observe and study skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Mathematical models explain how a wrinkle becomes a crease
Wrinkles, creases and folds are everywhere in nature, from the surface of human skin to the buckled crust of the Earth. They can also be useful structures for engineers. Wrinkles in thin films, for example, can help make durable circuit boards for flexible electronics. A new mathematical model developed by researchers from Brown University could help engineers control the formation of wrinkle, crease, and fold structures in a wide variety of materials. It may also help scientists understand how these structures form in nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Physical Review Letters
World's first magnetic hose created
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Department of Physics of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona has developed a material which guides and transports a magnetic field from one location to the other, similar to how an optical fiber transports light or a hose transports water. The creation could open up a wide field of applications, as happened with optical fibers.

Contact: Àlvar Sánchez
alvar.sanchez@uab.cat
34-935-811-132
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Nanoscale velcro used for molecule transport
Biological membranes separate the cell from the environment and at the same time control the import and export of molecules. The nuclear membrane can be crossed via many tiny pores. Scientists at the Biozentrum and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel, together with an international team of researchers, have discovered that proteins found within the nuclear pore function similar to a velcro. Nature Nanotechnology has published their results.

Contact: Katrin Bühler
Katrin.Buehler@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
UT Arlington nanoparticles could provide easier route for cell therapy
UT Arlington physics researchers may have developed a way to use laser technology to deliver drug and gene therapy at the cellular level without damaging surrounding tissue. The method eventually could help patients suffering from genetic conditions, cancers and neurological diseases.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-272-9208
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Pew awards research funding to 10 Latin American scientists
Ten researchers were named Pew Latin American Fellows in the Biomedical Sciences today by The Pew Charitable Trusts. By providing flexible funding and networking opportunities, the program allows early-career scientists to train in top U.S. laboratories and to develop skills and connections that will help them become scientific leaders in their home countries.
The Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Chelsea Toledo
ctoledo@pewtrusts.org
202-540-6846
Pew Health Group

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Pew and the Stewart Trust launch scholars program targeting cancer
The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust announced the inaugural class of Pew-Stewart Scholars for Cancer Research. Five promising early-career scientists will receive funding for research aimed at finding cures for cancer using approaches that include genetics, pharmacology, and structural biology.
The Pew Charitable Trusts, Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust

Contact: Chelsea Toledo
ctoledo@pewtrusts.org
202-540-6846
Pew Health Group

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
NSF grant funds UTA electrical engineer's bladder cancer detection device
A multi-institutional research team has received a $480,000 National Science Foundation grant to build an inexpensive device that uses nanotechnology and a simple urine test to detect the most miniscule amount of bladder cancer cells in a patient.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1664.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>