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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 501-525 out of 1788.

<< < 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 > >>

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
New UT Arlington equipment will stimulate nanoscale-related research, manufacturing
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher will use an Army Research Office grant to purchase a micro-optics assembly and characterization system that will usher in more intricate nanoscale-related research and manufacturing in the College of Engineering.
Army Research Office

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
One-atom-thin silicon transistors hold promise for super-fast computing
Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering have created the first transistors out of silicene, the world's thinnest silicon material. This new 'wonder material' could make computers and other electronics more efficient.
US Army Research Laboratory's Army Research Office, Cockrell School/Southwest Academy of Nanoelectronics, European Commission/Future and Emerging Technologies Programme

Contact: Sandra Zaragoza
zaragoza@utexas.edu
512-471-2129
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rediscovering spontaneous light emission
LEDs could replace lasers for short-range optical communications with the use of an optical antenna that enhances the spontaneous emission of light from atoms, molecules and semiconductor quantum dots.
NSF/Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penta-graphene, a new structural variant of carbon, discovered
Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and universities in China and Japan have discovered a new structural variant of carbon called 'penta-graphene' -- a very thin sheet of pure carbon that has a unique structure inspired by a pentagonal pattern of tiles found paving the streets of Cairo.

Contact: Brian McNeill
bwmcneill@vcu.edu
804-827-0889
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Nature Physics
Physicists observe motion of skyrmions
Small magnetic whirls may revolutionize future data storage and information processing if they can be moved rapidly and reliably in small structures. A team of scientists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and TU Berlin, together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Switzerland, has now been able to investigate the dynamics of these whirls experimentally.

Contact: Mathias Klaui
klaeui@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-23633
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section B
The rarely understood ammonium carbonate monohydrate
New structural studies of the superficially simple ammonium carbonate monohydrate could shed light on industrial processes, biochemistry and even the interstellar building blocks of life.
UK Science and Technology Facilities Council, Spanish Research and Innovation Office

Contact: Dr Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Physics
Team led by UCLA and Columbia engineers uses disorder to control light on a nanoscale
A breakthrough by a team of researchers from UCLA, Columbia University and other institutions could lead to the more precise transfer of information in computer chips, as well as new types of optical materials for light emission and lasers.

Contact: Matthew Chin
mchin@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0680
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Worms lead way to test nanoparticle toxicity
Rice University scientists use roundworm populations in low-cost, high-throughput toxicity tests for a range of nanoparticles. The tests could cut the cost of determining which nanoparticles should be studied further for applications and for their effects on the environment.
National Institutes of Health, Searle Scholar

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Advanced Functional Materials
Winding borders may enhance graphene
Theoretical physicists at Rice University show precise control of grain boundaries in graphene may give it predictable mechanical and semiconducting properties.
US Department of Energy, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Physics
Dance of the nanovortices
It is a familiar phenomenon: if a spinning top is set in rotation on an inclined surface, it scribes a series of small arches. Researchers at Berlin and Mainz together with research teams from the Netherlands and Switzerland have now succeeded in capturing this pattern of movement in a magnetic thin film system -- in the form of small magnetic nanovortices. The researchers made a new discovery: the nanovortices possess mass.

Contact: Antonia Roetger
antonia.roetger@helmholtz-berlin.de
49-308-062-43733
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Methods
Scientists open new chapter in cell biology and medicine
An entirely new approach for the mechanical characterization of cells, developed by scientists of the Technische Universität Dresden, has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases.

Contact: Dr. Jochen Guck
jochen.guck@tu-dresden.de
49-035-146-340-330
Technische Universität Dresden

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
New method allows for greater variation in band gap tunability
By manipulating the ordered arrangement of atoms in layered complex oxide materials, Northwestern University's James Rondinelli has found a way to control their electronic band gaps, which determines the electrical behavior of the material and how it interacts with light.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
UT Arlington awarded DOE grant to develop sensors for real-time evaluation of boilers
A University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor is developing a distributed wireless antenna sensor system to monitor conditions of coal-fired boilers that will lead to making the units safer, more efficient and eventually producing better designed units.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Nature Methods
DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect
'Bio-molecular interaction analysis, a cornerstone of biomedical research, is traditionally accomplished using equipment that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars,' said Wyss Associate Faculty member Wesley P. Wong, Ph.D., senior author of study. 'Rather than develop a new instrument, we've created a nanoscale tool made from strands of DNA that can detect and report how molecules behave, enabling biological measurements to be made by almost anyone, using only common and inexpensive laboratory reagents.'

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
PNNL recognized for moving biofuel, chemical analysis innovations to market
Developing renewable fuel from wet algae and enabling analysis of complex liquids are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully driven to the market with the help of commercial partners.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
Crystal light: New light-converting materials point to cheaper, more efficient solar power
Engineers have shone new light on an emerging family of solar-absorbing materials that could clear the way for cheaper and more efficient solar panels and LEDs. The materials, called perovskites, are particularly good at absorbing visible light, but had never been thoroughly studied in their purest form: as perfect single crystals. Using a new technique, researchers grew large, pure perovskite crystals and studied how electrons move through the material as light is converted to electricity.

Contact: RJ Taylor
rj.taylor@utoronto.ca
647-228-4358
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Lab on a Chip
Made-in-Singapore rapid test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva
Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology of A*STAR has developed a paper-based disposable device that will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.
Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

Contact: Nidyah Sani
nidyah@ibn.a-star.edu.sg
65-682-47005
Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency.

Contact: Vanessa Wood
wood@iis.ee.ethz.ch
41-446-326-654
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Award-winning research on DNA probes just published in Canadian Journal of Chemistry
The 2014 Fred Beamish Award was awarded to professor Juewen Liu (Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo). The Award Lecture titled 'Lanthanide-dependent RNA-cleaving DNAzymes as metal biosensors' is published today in the Canadian Journal of Chemistry.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@cdnsciencepub.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA/Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Physics
Researchers use sound to slow down, speed up, and block light
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced Transparency (BSIT), which can be used to slow down, speed up, and block light in an optical waveguide. The BSIT phenomenon permits light to travel in the forward direction while light traveling in the backward direction is strongly absorbed. This non-reciprocal behavior is essential for building isolators and circulators.
University of Illinois, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office for Scientific Research

Contact: Gaurav Bahl
bahl@illinois.edu
217-300-2194
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
CWRU researcher on the clock to improve early Ebola detection
To reduce or eliminate false positive results from the quickest and most sensitive Ebola test, researchers will make a positive control for processing Ebola DNA. The control will be made of non-infectious sequences of Ebola Virus nucleic acid tucked inside a plant virus' protective protein shell.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
ORNL researchers tune friction in ionic solids at the nanoscale
Experiments conducted by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered a way of controlling friction on ionic surfaces at the nanoscale using electrical stimulation and ambient water vapor.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Engineer receives NSF CAREER award for nanotechnology research, educational outreach
Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering at Kansas State University, has received a $500,000 National Science Foundation CAREER award for his nanotechnology research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gurpreet Singh
gurpreet@k-state.edu
785-532-7085
Kansas State University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
ACS Nano
Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors. The experiment is the first to show that these micromotors can operate safely in a living animal.

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 501-525 out of 1788.

<< < 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 > >>