News Tips from ACS NANO DOE Research News Site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
20-Nov-2014 21:14
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Options

Portal Home

Glossary

Background Articles

Research Papers

Meetings

Links & Resources

Essays

Online Chats

RSS Feed

Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 551-575 out of 1716.

<< < 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 > >>

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Mantis shrimp, toucan and trilobite, oh my
A team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside professor of engineering have been selected to receive a $7.5 million Department of Defense grant to uncover fundamental design rules and develop simple and basic scientific foundations for the predictable design of light-weight, tough and strong advanced materials inspired by a wide diversity of structures from plants and animals, including the mantis shrimp, toucan and bamboo.
Department of Defense

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
New state-of-the-art biotech and nanotech equipment for INRS
Professor Marc André Gauthier and Professor Luca Razzari of the Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre have each been awarded large grants from the John R. Evans Leaders Fund of the Canada Foundation for Innovation for the acquisition of state-of-the-art biotech and nanophotonics equipment. To this funding will be added matching grants from the Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche, de la Science et de la Technologie.
Canada Foundation for Innovation, Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche, de la Science et de la Technologie du Québec

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
INRS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Chiral breathing: Electrically controlled polymer changes its optical properties
Electrically controlled glasses with continuously adjustable transparency, new polarisation filters, and even chemosensors capable of detecting single molecules of specific chemicals could be fabricated thanks to a new polymer unprecedentedly combining optical and electrical properties.

Contact: Wlodzimierz Kutner
wkutner@ichf.edu.pl
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Applied Crystallography
More effective kidney stone treatment, from the macroscopic to the nanoscale
Researchers in France have hit on a novel method to help kidney stone sufferers ensure they receive the correct and most effective treatment possible.
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Thinnest feasible membrane produced
A new nano-membrane made out of the 'super material' graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The membrane produced by the researchers at ETH Zurich is as thin as is technologically possible.

Contact: Hyung Gyu Park
parkh@ethz.ch
41-446-329-460
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds
A new preclinical study by teams at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's/Harvard and James A. Haley VA Hospital/University of South Florida suggests that a combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly.
National Institutes of Health, US Deptartment of Veterans Affairs, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Scientists capture ultrafast snapshots of light-driven superconductivity
A new study pins down a major factor behind the appearance of superconductivity -- the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency -- in a promising copper-oxide material.
DOE's Office of Science, Stanford University, University of Hamburg

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Global scientific team 'visualizes' a new crystallization process
By combining a synchrotron's bright X-ray beam with high speed X-ray cameras, scientists from Stanford University in California and KAUST in Saudi Arabia shot a 'movie' showing how organic molecules form into crystals. This is a first. Their new techniques will improve our understanding of crystal packing and should help lead to better electronic devices as well as pharmaceuticals -- indeed any product whose properties depend on precisely controlling crystallization, as this paper describes.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists achieve first direct observations of excitons in motion
Technique developed at MIT reveals the motion of energy-carrying quasiparticles in solid material.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
Relieving electric vehicle range anxiety with improved batteries
A new, PNNL-developed nanomaterial called a metal organic framework could extend the lifespan of lithium-sulfur batteries, which could be used to increase the driving range of electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
Repeated self-healing now possible in composite materials
Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a 3-D vascular system that allows for high-performance composite materials such as fiberglass to heal autonomously, and repeatedly.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Army Research Laboratory, and others

Contact: August Cassens
acassens@illinois.edu
217-300-4181
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Targeting cancer with a triple threat
MIT chemists design nanoparticles that can deliver three cancer drugs at a time.
Royal Society of Chemistry, Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award, National Institutes of Health, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canad, Koch Institute Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Biomacromolecules
Nanocrystalline cellulose modified into an efficient viral inhibitor
Researchers at Aalto University and the University of Eastern Finland have succeeded in creating a surface on nano-sized cellulose crystals that imitates a biological structure. The surface adsorbs viruses and disables them. The results can prove useful in the development of antiviral ointments and surfaces, for instance.
Aalto University, University of Eastern Finland

Contact: Minna Hölttä
minna.holtta@aalto.fi
358-505-396-229
Aalto University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Materials research partnership renewed between UC Santa Barbara and Mitsubishi Chemical
Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation of Tokyo and University of California, Santa Barbara are extending their successful materials research partnership -- the Mitsubishi Chemical Center for Advanced Materials at UCSB -- with a nearly $6 million reinvestment over the next four years.

Contact: Melissa Van De Werfhorst
melissa@engineering.ucsb.edu
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Nano shake-up
Researchers in the University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have shown that routine procedures in handling and processing can have a significant influence on the size, shape and delivery of drug nano carriers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Photonics
Shiny quantum dots brighten future of solar cells
A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
British-American experimental physicist Stuart Parkin receives Millennium Technology Prize
Professor Stuart Parkin of the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California, USA, received the 2014 Millennium Technology Prize for his contributions to interdisciplinary materials research. The British-American experimental physicist is a Fellow of the Gutenberg Research College and an external member of the Graduate School of Excellence 'Materials Science in Mainz' at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

Contact: Dr. Matthias Neubert
gfk@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-23681
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pioneering findings on the dual role of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis
Scientists at Umea University in Sweden have found that carbon dioxide, in its ionic form bicarbonate, has a regulating function in the splitting of water in photosynthesis. This means that carbon dioxide has an additional role to being reduced to sugar. The pioneering work is published in the latest issue of the scientific journal PNAS.

Contact: Johannes Messinger
johannes.messinger@umu.se
46-090-786-5933
Umea University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Better solar cells, better LED light and vast optical possibilities
NTNU-researchers have discovered that by tuning a small strain on single nanowires they can become more effective in LEDs and solar cells.

Contact: Steinar Brandslet
steinar.brandslet@ntnu.no
479-321-4333
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
ASU leads new national research network to study impacts of nanomaterials
The Environmental Protection Agency is establishing a new national research network to assess the potential environmental impacts of the engineered nanomaterials that are increasingly used in consumer products. The agency has awarded a $5 million grant to support the consortium, which will be based at Arizona State University.
US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Joe Kullman
joe.kullman@asu.edu
480-965-8122
Arizona State University

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
New self-healing plastics developed
Scratches in the car finish or cracks in polymer material: self-healing materials can repair themselves by restoring their initial molecular structure after the damage. Scientists of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Evonik Industries have developed a chemical crosslinking reaction that ensures good short-term healing properties of the material under mild heating. The research results have now been published in the Advanced Materials journal.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
Researchers develop ErSb nanostructures with applications in infrared and terahertz ranges
UC Santa Barbara have created a compound semiconductor of nearly perfect quality with embedded nanostructures containing ordered lines of atoms that can manipulate light energy in the mid-infrared range. More efficient solar cells, less risky and higher resolution biological imaging, and the ability to transmit massive amounts of data at higher speeds are only a few applications that this unique semiconductor will be able to support.

Contact: Melissa Van De Werfhorst
melissa@engineering.ucsb.edu
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section A
Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles
Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. It occurs in gemstones and snowflakes and even in biology, an area typically associated with complexity and diversity. There are striking examples: the shapes of virus particles, such as those causing the common cold, are highly symmetrical and look like tiny footballs.
Leverhulme Research Leadership Award

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The motion of the medium matters for self-assembling particles, Penn research shows
Earlier work assumed that the liquid medium in which certain self-assembling particles float could be treated as a placid vacuum, but a University of Pennsylvania team has shown that fluid dynamics play a crucial role in the kind and quality of the structures that can be made in this way.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
No compromises: JILA's short, flexible, reusable AFM probe
JILA researchers have engineered a short, flexible, reusable probe for the atomic force microscope that enables state-of-the-art precision and stability in picoscale force measurements. Shorter, softer and more agile than standard and recently enhanced AFM probes, the JILA tips will benefit nanotechnology and studies of folding and stretching in biomolecules such as proteins and DNA.
National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Showing releases 551-575 out of 1716.

<< < 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 > >>