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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 651-675 out of 1782.

<< < 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Journal of Agricultural Economics
Nutrition, safety key to consumer acceptance of nanotech, genetic modification in foods
New research shows that the majority of consumers will accept the presence of nanotechnology or genetic modification (GM) technology in foods -- but only if the technology enhances the nutrition or improves the safety of the food.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
eLife
Revealed: How bacteria drill into our cells and kill them
A team of scientists has revealed how certain harmful bacteria drill into our cells to kill them. Their study shows how bacterial 'nanodrills' assemble themselves on the outer surfaces of our cells, and includes the first movie of how they then punch holes in the cells' outer membranes.

Contact: Siobhan Pipa
siobhan.pipa@ucl.ac.uk
44-207-679-9041
University College London

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
'Smart dust' technology could reshape space telescopes
Scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory are exploring a new type of space telescope with an aperture made of swarms of particles released from a canister and controlled by a laser. These floating lenses would be larger, cheaper and lighter than apertures on conventional space-based imaging systems like NASA's Hubble and James Webb space telescope.
NASA

Contact: Susan Gawlowicz
smguns@rit.edu
585-475-5061
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Nature Materials
Penn research shows way to design 'digital' metamaterials
Figuring out the necessary composition and internal structure to create the unusual properties of metamaterials is a challenge but new Penn research, borrowing concepts from binary computing, presents a way of simplifying things.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Possible read head for quantum computers
Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamonds could be used to construct vital components for quantum computers. But hitherto it has been impossible to read optically written information from such systems electronically. Using a graphene layer, a team of scientists headed by Professor Alexander Holleitner of the Technische Universität München has now implemented just such a read unit.
German Research Foundation, European Research Council, EU Marie Curie Program

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Science
Microbullet hits confirm graphene's strength
Rice University scientists use microbullets in experiments to show graphene is 10 times better than steel at absorbing the energy of a penetrating projectile.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
Scanning tunneling microscopy: Computer simulations sharpen insights into molecules
The resolution of scanning tunneling microscopes can be improved dramatically by attaching small molecules or atoms to their tip. The resulting images were the first to show the geometric structure of molecules and have generated a lot of interest among scientists over the last few years. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Prague have now used computer simulations to gain deeper insights into these new imaging techniques.

Contact: Tobias Schloesser
t.schloesser@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-4771
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Advanced Energy Materials
New electrolyte for the construction of magnesium-sulfur batteries
The Helmholtz Institute Ulm established by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology is pushing research relating to batteries of the next and next-but-one generations: A research team has now developed an electrolyte that may be used for the construction of magnesium-sulfur battery cells. With magnesium, higher storage densities could be achieved than with lithium. Moreover, magnesium is abundant in nature, it is non-toxic, and does not degrade in air. The new electrolyte is now presented in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Particles, waves and ants
Particles or waves traveling through disordered media are scattered at small impurities. Surprisingly, the density of these impurities does not affect the overall dwell time the particle -- or wave -- spends inside the medium. This remarkable finding applies not only to particles and waves, but also to crawling ants or drunken sailors hitting streetlamps.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Protons fuel graphene prospects
Graphene, impermeable to all gases and liquids, can easily allow protons to pass through it, University of Manchester researchers have found.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
The mysterious 'action at a distance' between liquid containers
For several years, it has been known that superfluid helium housed in reservoirs located next to each other acts collectively, even when the channels connecting the reservoirs are too narrow and too long to allow for substantial flow. A new theoretical model reveals that the phenomenon of mysterious communication 'at a distance' between fluid reservoirs is much more common than previously thought.

Contact: Anna Maciołek
maciolek@is.mpg.de
49-711-689-1903
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Van der Waals force re-measured
Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. They demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast. Their findings could help to improve simulation methods for chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science.

Contact: Tobias Schloesser
t.schloesser@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-4771
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
'Giant' charge density disturbances discovered in nanomaterials
Scientists in Jülich have, with the help of computer simulations, discovered a combination of materials that strengthens the so-called Friedel oscillations and bundles them, as if with a lens, in different directions. With a range of 50 nanometers, these 'giant anisotropic charge density oscillations' are many times greater than normal and open up new possibilities in the field of nanoelectronics to exchange or filter magnetic information.
Helmholtz Young Investigators Groups

Contact: Angela Wenzik
a.wenzik@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-6048
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Stanford engineers invent high-tech mirror to beam heat away from buildings into space
Stanford engineers have invented a material designed to help cool buildings. The material reflects incoming sunlight, and it sends heat from inside the structure directly into space as infrared radiation.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
NASA's Webb Telescope mirror tripod in action
Setting up NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's secondary mirror in space will require special arms that resemble a tripod. NASA recently completed a test of the tripod to ensure it would function properly in space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals
Nanoporous metals -- foam-like materials that have some degree of air vacuum in their structure -- have a wide range of applications because of their superior qualities.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists bind single-atom sheets with the same force geckos use to climb walls
The approach is to design synergistic materials by combining two single-atom thick sheets, for example, that act as a photovoltaic cell as well as a light-emitting diode, converting energy between electricity and radiation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Two Rutgers professors named fellows of top national science association
Two Rutgers professors are among 401 members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science who have been elevated to the rank of fellow. The pre-eminent national organization selects its fellows based on their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists and chemists work to improve digital memory technology
A team led by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers study graphene and ammonia to develop high-speed, high-capacity random access memory.

Contact: Alexei Gruverman
alexei_gruverman@unl.edu
402-472-4788
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Two Kansas State University researchers named AAAS fellows
A physicist and an entomologist have been named 2014 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, or AAAS, the world's largest scientific society.
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Greg Tammen
gtammen@k-state.edu
785-532-4486
Kansas State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-727-0369
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Research reveals how our bodies keep unwelcome visitors out of cell nuclei
The structure of pores found in cell nuclei has been uncovered by a UCL-led team of scientists, revealing how they selectively block certain molecules from entering, protecting genetic material and normal cell functions. The discovery could lead to the development of new drugs against viruses that target the cell nucleus and new ways of delivering gene therapies, say the scientists behind the study.
European Molecular Biology Organization, Kazakh Ministry of Education and Science, Sackler Foundation, UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Siobhan Pipa
siobhan.pipa@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-767-99041
University College London

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Showing releases 651-675 out of 1782.

<< < 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>