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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1672.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
International Journal of Pharmaceutics
Supermaterial gives rejected drugs a new chance
More than 80 percent of all drug candidates in the pharma R&D suffer from poor solubility and are therefore rejected early in the drug discovery process. Now Uppsala University researchers show that the new material Upsalite, has great potential for development of new formulations of these rejected drugs.

Contact: Maria Strømme
maria.stromme@angstrom.uu.se
46-070-167-9104
Uppsala University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Inorganic Chemistry
Oregon chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution
The yield so far is small, but chemists at the University of Oregon have developed a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process to make a precursor to transparent thin films that could find use in electronics and alternative energy devices.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Syracuse University chemist to use NSF grant to study materials chemistry, nanoscience
Mathew M. Maye, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The award supports his ongoing work with metal stainless alloy nanostructures, the results of which may impact gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. 

National Science Foundation

Contact: Rob Enslin
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Carbyne morphs when stretched
Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator. The research has implications for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics.
Robert Welch Foundation, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon. These gases are used in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, one that can be hazardous when it accumulates in buildings. Research appearing on July 20th in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out. The results might lead to cheaper, less energy intensive ways to extract these gases.
Department of Energy, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Highly charged ions
Why can't neodymium be more like tin? Well it can, if you ionize it enough. Why strip atoms of a dozen or more electrons? To make them more amenable for use in atomic clocks and quantum computers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
'Nanocamera' takes pictures at distances smaller than light's own wavelength
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light. A standard optical microscope acts as a 'nanocamera' whereas the pillar-bowtie nanoantennas are the analogous film.

Contact: Kimani Toussaint
ktoussai@illinois.edu
217-244-4088
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
First ab initio method for characterizing hot carriers
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed the first ab initio method for characterizing the properties of 'hot carriers' in semiconductors. This should help clear a major road block to the development of new, more efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Modern Physics Letters B
Plasmon-enhanced Polarization-selective filter
This structure composed of multiple holes array by filling it with nonlinear medium combines the characteristics of selectable wavelength, enhanced transmission, polarization separation and output control by the intensity of incident light. This result is useful for integrated optical circuits and on-chip optical interconnects.
National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis
Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier.
Cancer Research UK, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council, Department of Health

Contact: Gail Wilson
gail.wilson@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage
A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University.
Rice University, National Institutes of Health, IBM, CISCO, Qlogic, Adaptive Computing, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Rice nanophotonics experts create powerful molecular sensor
Nanophotonics experts at Rice University have created a unique sensor that amplifies the optical signature of molecules by about 100 billion times. Newly published tests found the device could accurately identify the composition and structure of individual molecules containing fewer than 20 atoms.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Smallest Swiss cross -- Made of 20 single atoms
The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Together with teams from Finland and Japan, physicists from the University of Basel were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest 'Swiss cross', thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices. The academic journal Nature Communications has published their results.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
PNNL scientists win 3 R&D 100 awards for visual display, analytics and energy technologies
Technologies that rival electronic screens, enable new molecular analysis and reduce dependence on fossil fuels received recognition for their innovation today.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Illinois researchers demonstrate novel, tunable nanoantennas
A University of Illinois research team has developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems, whereby plasmonic field enhancement can actuate mechanical motion. The team's fabrication process shows for the first time an innovative way of fabricating plasmonic nanoantenna structures under the SEM, which avoids complications such as proximity effects from conventional lithography techniques.

Contact: Kimani Toussaint
ktoussai@illinois.edu
217-244-4088
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Science
The world's first photonic router
Weizmann Institute scientists have demonstrated for the first time a photonic router -- a quantum device based on a single atom that enables routing of single photons by single photons. This achievement, as reported in Science magazine, is another step toward overcoming the difficulties in building quantum computers.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Rutgers chemists develop technology to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel
Rutgers researchers have developed a technology that could overcome a major cost barrier to make clean-burning hydrogen fuel -- a fuel that could replace expensive and environmentally harmful fossil fuels. The new technology is a novel catalyst that performs almost as well as cost-prohibitive platinum for so-called electrolysis reactions, which use electric currents to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. The Rutgers technology is also far more efficient than less-expensive catalysts investigated to-date.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2014
Nature Chemistry
Researchers discover boron 'buckyball'
The discovery of buckyballs -- soccer-ball-shaped molecules of carbon -- helped usher in the nanotechnology era. Now, researchers from Brown University and universities in China have shown that boron, carbon's neighbor on the periodic table, can form a cage-like molecule similar to the buckyball. Until now, such a boron structure had only been a theoretical speculation. The researchers dubbed their new-found nanostructure 'borospherene.'
National Science Foundation, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research
Sophisticated radiation detector designed for broad public use
Nuclear engineers have developed a small, portable and inexpensive radiation detection device that should help people all over the world better understand the radiation around them, its type and intensity, and whether or not it poses a health risk.

Contact: Abi Farsoni
abi.farsoni@oregonstate.edu
541-737-9645
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Universities of Surrey and Strathclyde selected as strategic partners in the future operation of the National Physical Laboratory
The Universities of Strathclyde and Surrey have been identified as preferred partners to enter into a new strategic partnership with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the world-renowned National Physical Laboratory (NPL), a global center of excellence in measurement and materials science. This new partnership will help to provide future leadership of NPL.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
01-483-686-141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Illinois study advances limits for ultrafast nano-devices
A recent study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale, and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
Army Research Office, US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: David G. Cahill
d-cahill@illinois.edu
217-333-6753
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Projecting a 3-dimensional future
A team of Tel Aviv University researchers has developed highly efficient holography based on nanoantennas, using the parameters of light itself to create dynamic and complex holographic images. Their research could be used for security as well as medical and recreational purposes, improving laser-based radars and advancing anti-counterfeiting techniques to safeguard against theft.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Physical Review E
Even geckos can lose their grip
Not even geckos and spiders can sit upside down forever. Nanophysics makes sure of that. Mechanics researchers at Linköping University have demonstrated this in an article just published in Physical Review E. Knowledge that can be of great industrial benefit.

Contact: Stefan Lindström
stefan.lindstrom@liu.se
46-013-281-127
Linköping University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Using sand to improve battery performance
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1672.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>