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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1703.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
UT Arlington genomic data-mining framework to aid manufacturers discover desired materials
A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Methods
New knowledge of cannabis paves the way for drug development
Revolutionary nanotechnology method could help improve the development of new medicine and reduce costs. Researchers from the Nano-Science Center and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new screening method that makes it possible to study cell membrane proteins that bind drugs, such as cannabis and adrenaline, while reducing the consumption of precious samples by a billion times.
Danish Strategic Research Council, Lundbeck Foundation

Contact: Rikke Bøyesen
rb@nano.ku.dk
452-875-0413
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Layered graphene sandwich for next generation electronics
Sandwiching layers of graphene with white graphene could produce designer materials capable of creating high-frequency electronic devices, University of Manchester scientists have found.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Doped graphene nanoribbons with potential
Graphene is a semiconductor when prepared as an ultra-narrow ribbon -- although the material is actually a conductive material. Researchers from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now developed a new method to selectively dope graphene molecules with nitrogen atoms.

Contact: Martina Peter
redaktion@empa.ch
41-587-654-987
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Light detector to revolutionize night vision technology
Researchers have developed a light detector that could revolutionize chemical sensing and night vision technology.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
rachael.fergusson@monash.edu
61-399-034-841
Monash University

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
Nature Chemistry
Continuing Bragg legacy of structure determination
Over 100 years since the Nobel Prize-winning father and son team Sir William and Sir Lawrence Bragg pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structure, University of Adelaide researchers have made significant new advances in the field.

Contact: Chris Sumby
christopher.sumby@adelaide.edu.au
61-046-877-682
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Magnetic nanocubes self-assemble into helical superstructures
Collaborating with nanochemists led by Rafal Klajn at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, who found that magnetite nanocubes can self-assemble into helical superstructures under certain conditions, UIC theoretical chemist Petr Kral and his students simulated the phenomenon and explained the conditions under which it can occur.
Israel Science Foundation, G.M.J. Schmidt-Minerva Center for Supramolecular Architectures, Minerva Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
UCSB researchers develop ultra sensitive biosensor from molybdenite semiconductor
UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrate atomically thin, ultrasensitive and scalable molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistor based biosensors and establish their potential for single-molecule detection
National Science Foundation, California NanoSystems Institute, Materials Research Laboratory

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
A metallic alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures
A multi-element high‐entropy alloy not only tests out as one of the toughest materials on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Optica
Atomically thin material opens door for integrated nanophotonic circuits
Researchers at the University of Rochester describe a new combination of materials that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light.
Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Soft Robotics
Harvard and Cornell researchers develop untethered, autonomous soft robot
A multidisciplinary team detail the innovative composite materials, design features, and fabrication methods they used to develop a soft robot capable of functioning for several hours using a battery pack or for longer periods with a light-weight electrical tether, and able to carry payloads of up to 8 kg.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
European Physical Journal B
Nano-pea pod model widens electronics applications
Periodic chain-like nanostructures are widely used in nanoelectronics. Typically, chain elements include the likes of quantum rings, quantum dots, or quantum graphs. Such a structure enables electrons to move along the chain, in theory, indefinitely. Now, a new study, published in EPJ B, identifies ways of disturbing the periodicity of a model nanostructure to obtain the desired discrete energy spectrum with localized electrons.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Peptoid nanosheets at the oil-water interface
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have developed peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water, opening the door to increased structural complexity and chemical functionality for a broad range of applications.
DOE/Office of Science, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UO-Berkeley Lab unveil new nano-sized synthetic scaffolding technique
Scientists, including University of Oregon chemist Geraldine Richmond, have tapped oil and water to create scaffolds of self-assembling, synthetic proteins called peptoid nanosheets that mimic complex biological mechanisms and processes.
US Department of Energy, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells
Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form across a large number of vertical nanowires, known as a 'nano-forest'.

Contact: Aleksandra Dabkowska
aleksandra.dabkowska@fkem1.lu.se
46-462-228-148
Lund University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lan Yang, Ph.D., the Das Family Career Development Associate Professor in Electrical & Systems Engineering, and their collaborators at Tsinghua University in China have developed a new sensor that can detect and count nanoparticles, at sizes as small as 10 nanometers, one at a time. The researchers say the sensor could potentially detect much smaller particles, viruses and small molecules.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Julie Flory
Julie.Flory@WUSTL.EDU
314-935-5408
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Technology
Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles
We systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions. While aggregation is shown to produce significant reductions in both heating and MRI contrast, we also present a new method to quantify and correlate these effects for clinical applications, such as cancer hyperthermia, utilizing sweep imaging with Fourier transform MRI.
University of Minnesota, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology
One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the world have made all sorts of attempts to achieve this, but now scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute have succeeded in creating a steady stream of photons emitted one at a time and in a particular direction.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-28-75-06-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
Copper shines as flexible conductor
By turning instead to copper, both abundant and cheap, researchers at Monash University and the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication have developed a way of making flexible conductors cost-effective enough for commercial application.

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
A new, tunable device for spintronics
Recently, the research group of Professor Jairo Sinova from the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in collaboration with researchers from the UK, Prague, and Japan, has for the first time realised a new, efficient spin-charge converter based on the common semiconductor material GaAs. These results have recently been published in the journal Nature Materials.

Contact: Jairo Sinova
sinova@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-21284
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits
A new research platform uses a laser to measure the 'nanomechanical' properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Lab on a Chip
Nanoscale assembly line
ETH researchers have realized a long-held dream: inspired by an industrial assembly line, they have developed a nanoscale production line for the assembly of biological molecules.

Contact: Viola Vogel
viola.vogel@hest.ethz.ch
41-446-320-887
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Novel 'butterfly' molecule could build new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices
Exciting new work by a Florida State University research team has led to a novel molecular system that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time
One of nature's mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun's rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant's blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes. Researchers at DTU Physics have now managed to successfully 'film' this process.

Contact: Tim Brandt van Driel
tidr@fysik.dtu.dk
45-45-25-31-82
Technical University of Denmark

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1703.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>