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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1679.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
UT Arlington receives Walmart, Walmart Foundation innovation grant
UT Arlington has received a $229,214 grant from the Walmart Foundation to build a robotic small motors assembly and testing system that would cut the manufacturing costs of goods, allowing those goods to be produced in the United States that were formerly built overseas.
Walmart Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Scientists fold RNA origami from a single strand
RNA origami is a new method for organizing molecules on the nanoscale, making it possible to fabricate complicated shapes from a single strand of RNA. Unlike existing methods for folding DNA molecules, RNA origamis are produced by enzymes and simultaneously fold into pre-designed shapes. This may allow designer RNA structures to be grown within living cells and used to organize cellular enzymes into biochemical factories. The method is reported in the latest issue of Science.

Contact: Ebbe Sloth Andersen
esa@inano.au.dk
454-117-8619
Aarhus University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard
Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The study may be a breakthrough in understanding how a critical part of the brain, called the thalamic reticular nucleus, influences consciousness.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medicine, National Science Foundation, Mathematical Biosciences Institute

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nano Letters
Novel chip-based platform could simplify measurements of single molecules
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a new approach for studying single molecules and nanoparticles by combining electrical and optical measurements on an integrated chip-based platform. In a paper published July 9 in Nano Letters, the researchers reported using the device to distinguish viruses from similarly sized nanoparticles with 100 percent fidelity.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Scientific Reports
New test reveals purity of graphene
A new test using terahertz waves can check graphene for atmospheric and other contaminants that affect its electronic performance.
National Science Foundation, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology-Japan, Murata Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nano Letters
Eco-friendly 'pre-fab nanoparticles' could revolutionize nano manufacturing
A team of materials chemists, polymer scientists, device physicists and others at the University of Massachusetts Amherst today report a breakthrough technique for controlling molecular assembly of nanoparticles over multiple length scales that should allow faster, cheaper, more ecologically friendly manufacture of organic photovoltaics and other electronic devices. Details are in the current issue of Nano Letters.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Lab on a Chip
Foam favorable for oil extraction
Rice University researchers demonstrate that foam may be a superior fluid to displace and extract tough-to-reach oil.
Department of Energy, Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Abu Dhabi Oil R&D Sub-Committee, Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations, Zakum Development Company, Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Company, Petroleum Institute of the United Arab Emirates

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
2D Materials
Researchers prove stability of wonder material silicene
An international team of researchers has taken a significant step towards understanding the fundamental properties of the two-dimensional material silicene by showing that it can remain stable in the presence of oxygen.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Scientists discover the miracle of how geckos move, cling to ceilings
Researchers have developed a model that explains how geckos, as well as spiders and some insects, can run up and down walls, cling to ceilings, and seemingly defy gravity with such effortless grace.

Contact: Alex Greaney
alex.greaney@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Nanoscale
'Trojan horse' treatment could beat brain tumors
A 'Trojan horse' treatment for an aggressive form of brain cancer, which involves using tiny nanoparticles of gold to kill tumor cells, has been successfully tested by scientists. The ground-breaking technique could eventually be used to treat glioblastoma multiforme, which is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults, and notoriously difficult to treat.

Contact: Tom Kirk
tdk25@cam.ac.uk
01-223-768-377
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Technology
Focal blood-brain-barrier disruption with high-frequency pulsed electric fields
Novel method uses bursts of nanosecond duration electric pulses to open the blood-brain-barrier as a potential therapy for brain cancer and neurological disorders.
National Science Foundation, Golfers Against Cancer, Center for Biomolecular Imaging in the Wake Forest School of Medicine

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Science
Nanocubes get in a twist
Competing forces coax nanocubes into helical structures.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43852
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 10-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Pairing old technologies with new for next-generation electronic devices
University College London scientists have discovered a new method to efficiently generate and control currents based on the magnetic nature of electrons in semi-conducting materials, offering a radical way to develop a new generation of electronic devices.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Funai Foundation for Information Technology, European Research Council, Czech Grant Agency, Czech Academy of Sciences PraemiumAcademiae, Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation, JST

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Surface Review and Letters
Which structure has optimal resistive switching characteristics?
Researchers fabricated Pt/TiOx/ZnO/n+-Si structures and investigated the effects of TiOx interlayer with different thickness on the resistance switching of Pt/TiOx/ZnO/n+-Si structures.
Chinese National Natural Science Foundation Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Designing better materials for the 21st century
The US Defense Department recently named Jian Luo, professor of nanoengineering and materials science and engineering at the University of California, San Diego as one of 10 new National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellows. The award provides up to $3 million over five years to develop a new materials design tool called interfacial phase diagrams.
US Department of Defense

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Harry Atwater and Albert Polman receive the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics 2014
This year's Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics will be awarded to Dr. Harry A. Atwater and Dr. Albert Polman for their pioneering achievements in plasmonics and novel nanophotonic routes to ultrahigh-efficiency solar energy conversion. The award, accompanied by US$5,000, will be presented on Sept. 1 at the Muziekgebouw in Amsterdam during the Julius Springer Forum on Applied Physics 2014.

Contact: Renate Bayaz
renate.bayaz@springer.com
49-622-148-78531
Springer

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Nature
Synthesis of structurally pure carbon nanotubes using molecular seeds
For the first time, researchers at Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research have succeeded in 'growing' single-wall carbon nanotubes with a single predefined structure -- and hence with identical electronic properties. And here is how they pulled it off: the CNTs 'assembled themselves,' as it were, out of tailor-made organic precursor molecules on a platinum surface, as reported by the researchers in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

Contact: Martina Peter
redaktion@empa.ch
41-587-654-987
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
6th International Meeting on Origami in Science, Math and Education
Science
Learning from origami to design new materials
A challenge increasingly important to physicists and materials scientists in recent years has been how to design controllable new materials that exhibit desired physical properties rather than relying on those properties to emerge naturally, says University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Christian Santangelo. Now he and physicist Arthur Evans and polymer scientist Ryan Hayward at University Massachusetts Amherst, with others, are using origami-based folding methods for 'tuning' the fundamental physical properties of any type of thin sheet.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Sixth International Meeting on Origami in Science, Mathematics and Education
Science
Origami could lead to exotic materials, tiny transformers
Embracing the pleats, creases and tucks of the Japanese art of decorative paper folding, Cornell University researchers are uncovering how origami principles could lead to exotic materials, soft robots and even tiny transformers. Publishing online in the journal Science Aug. 8.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Science
Small, origami-inspired pop-up robots function autonomously
Inspired by the traditional Japanese art form of origami or 'folding paper,' researchers have developed a way to coax flat sheets of composite materials to self-fold into complex robots that crawl and turn.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Research

Contact: Natasha D. Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Nature
NIST ion duet offers tunable module for quantum simulator
Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have demonstrated a pas de deux of atomic ions that combines the fine choreography of dance with precise individual control. The ion duet, described in the Aug. 7 issue of Nature, is a component for a flexible quantum simulator that could be scaled up in size and configured to model quantum systems of a complexity that overwhelms traditional computer simulations.
Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
The next graphene?
Three University of California, Riverside engineers are part of team recently awarded a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to characterize, analyze and synthesize a new class of ultra-thin film materials that could improve the performance of personal electronics, optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Butterflies could hold key to probes that repair genes
New discoveries about how butterflies feed could help engineers develop tiny probes that siphon liquid out of single cells for a wide range of medical tests and treatments, according to Clemson University researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Konstantin Kornev
kkornev@clemson.edu
864-656-6541
Clemson University

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Nanotechnology
Used-cigarette butts offer energy storage solution
A group of scientists from South Korea have converted used-cigarette butts into a high-performing material that could be integrated into computers, handheld devices, electrical vehicles and wind turbines to store energy.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Diamond defect interior design
By carefully controlling the position of an atomic-scale diamond defect within a volume smaller than what some viruses would fill, researchers have cleared a path toward better quantum computers and nanoscale sensors. They describe their technique in a paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1679.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>