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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1664.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
Northwestern University researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
University of Delaware

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
European Physical Journal B
Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots -- a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study published in European Physical Journal B demonstrates that changing the coupling of three coherently coupled quantum dots with electrical impulses can help better control them.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed
A research team led by group leader Yung-Eun Sung has announced that they have developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells.
Institute for Basic Science, Center for Integrated Smart Sensors, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Hanbin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
ETH student develops filter for clean water around the world
An innovative filter makes it possible to purify water more quickly, simply and economically than ever before. The developers hope the device will soon play a big role development aid, and they are looking for investors to help them achieve this goal.

Contact: Media Releations ETH Zurich
mediareleations@hk.ethz.ch
41-446-324-141
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs
A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor devised by Tel Aviv University's Professor Fernando Patolsky picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion.
Tracense

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nano Research
A crystal wedding in the nanocosmos
Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, the Vienna University of Technology and the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Lublin have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. With this new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units can be accommodated on a single chip in the future. The research results will be published in the journal Nano Research.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Physical Review A
Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals
Physicists Sergei Filippov and Mario Ziman have found a way to preserve quantum entanglement of particles passing through an amplifier and, conversely, when transmitting a signal over long distances.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-498-744-6526
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
UT Dallas professor receives Engineer of the Year award
Dr. Terry Baughn, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering at UT Dallas, has been named Engineer of the Year by the North Texas section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He mentors teams of senior design students with their capstone projects
North Texas Section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Contact: LaKisha Ladson
lakisha.ladson@UTDallas.edu
972-883-4183
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
ACS Nano
NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast
Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they'll spin around their long axes like tiny drill bits. Why? No one yet knows exactly. But NIST researchers have clocked their speed -- and it's fast. At up to 150,000 revolutions per minute, 10 times faster than any nanorotor ever reported.

Contact: Mark Esser
mark.esser@nist.gov
301-975-8735
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Optica
'Comb on a chip' powers new NIST/Caltech atomic clock design
NIST and CalTech researchers have demonstrated a novel design for a small atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale frequency comb, or a microcomb.

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
ACS Nano
NUS scientists use low cost technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials
By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
International Journal of Pharmaceutics
Supermaterial gives rejected drugs a new chance
More than 80 percent of all drug candidates in the pharma R&D suffer from poor solubility and are therefore rejected early in the drug discovery process. Now Uppsala University researchers show that the new material Upsalite, has great potential for development of new formulations of these rejected drugs.

Contact: Maria Strømme
maria.stromme@angstrom.uu.se
46-070-167-9104
Uppsala University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Inorganic Chemistry
Oregon chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution
The yield so far is small, but chemists at the University of Oregon have developed a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process to make a precursor to transparent thin films that could find use in electronics and alternative energy devices.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Syracuse University chemist to use NSF grant to study materials chemistry, nanoscience
Mathew M. Maye, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The award supports his ongoing work with metal stainless alloy nanostructures, the results of which may impact gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. 

National Science Foundation

Contact: Rob Enslin
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Carbyne morphs when stretched
Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator. The research has implications for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics.
Robert Welch Foundation, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon. These gases are used in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, one that can be hazardous when it accumulates in buildings. Research appearing on July 20th in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out. The results might lead to cheaper, less energy intensive ways to extract these gases.
Department of Energy, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Highly charged ions
Why can't neodymium be more like tin? Well it can, if you ionize it enough. Why strip atoms of a dozen or more electrons? To make them more amenable for use in atomic clocks and quantum computers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
'Nanocamera' takes pictures at distances smaller than light's own wavelength
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light. A standard optical microscope acts as a 'nanocamera' whereas the pillar-bowtie nanoantennas are the analogous film.

Contact: Kimani Toussaint
ktoussai@illinois.edu
217-244-4088
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
First ab initio method for characterizing hot carriers
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed the first ab initio method for characterizing the properties of 'hot carriers' in semiconductors. This should help clear a major road block to the development of new, more efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Modern Physics Letters B
Plasmon-enhanced Polarization-selective filter
This structure composed of multiple holes array by filling it with nonlinear medium combines the characteristics of selectable wavelength, enhanced transmission, polarization separation and output control by the intensity of incident light. This result is useful for integrated optical circuits and on-chip optical interconnects.
National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis
Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier.
Cancer Research UK, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council, Department of Health

Contact: Gail Wilson
gail.wilson@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage
A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University.
Rice University, National Institutes of Health, IBM, CISCO, Qlogic, Adaptive Computing, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Rice nanophotonics experts create powerful molecular sensor
Nanophotonics experts at Rice University have created a unique sensor that amplifies the optical signature of molecules by about 100 billion times. Newly published tests found the device could accurately identify the composition and structure of individual molecules containing fewer than 20 atoms.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1664.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>