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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 776-800 out of 1733.

<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
On the road to Mottronics
At Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers controlled the conducting/insulating phases of ultra-thin films of Mott materials by applying an epitaxial strain to the crystal lattice. This is an important step on the road to Mottronics.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
ACS Nano
A fast and effective mechanism to combat an aggressive cancer
Professor Dan Peer of Tel Aviv University has developed a new strategy to tackle an aggressive subtype of ovarian cancer using a new nanoscale drug-delivery system designed to target specific cancer cells. He and his team have devised a cluster of nanoparticles called gagomers, made of fats and coated with a kind of polysugar. When filled with chemotherapy drugs, these clusters accumulate in tumors, producing dramatically therapeutic benefits.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Physical Review Letters
Penn researchers 'design for failure' with model material
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have devised a method to study stress at the macro and micro scales at the same time, using a model system in which microscopic particles stand in for molecules. This method has allowed the researchers to demonstrate an unusual hybrid behavior in their model material: a reversible rearrangement of its particles that nevertheless has the characteristics of plastic deformation on the macroscale.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Analytical Chemistry
NIST microanalysis technique makes the most of small nanoparticle samples
Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Food and Drug Administration have demonstrated that they can make sensitive chemical analyses of minute samples of nanoparticles by, essentially, roasting them on top of a quartz crystal. The National Institute of Standards and Technology-developed technique, 'microscale thermogravimetric analysis,' holds promise for studying nanomaterials in biology and the environment, where sample sizes often are quite small and larger-scale analysis won't work.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Environmental Science Processes and Impacts
Nanotracer tester tells about wells
A tabletop device invented at Rice University can tell how efficiently a nanoparticle would travel through a well and may provide a wealth of information for oil and gas producers.
Robert A. Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Frontiers in Materials
Frontiers launches a new open-access journal: Frontiers in Materials
Frontiers -- a community driven open-access publisher and research networking platform -- is pleased to announce the launch of a new open-access journal: Frontiers in Materials.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
gozde.zorlu@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
New process uses recyclable catalyst to create porous materials
University of Connecticut chemists have discovered a new way of making monomodal mesoporous metal oxides that allows for greater manufacturing controls and has significantly broader applications than the longtime industry standard.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Steven L. Suib
steven.suib@uconn.edu
860-486-2797
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 23-Feb-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists unlock a 'microbial Pompeii'
An international team of researchers have discovered a 'microbial Pompeii' preserved on the teeth of skeletons around 1,000 years old. The key to the discovery is the dental calculus (plaque) which preserves bacteria and microscopic particles of food on the surfaces of teeth, effectively creating a mineral tomb for microbiomes.

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-077-953-15029
University of York

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Science
New, inexpensive production materials boost promise of hydrogen fuel
In a study published last week in the journal Science, Choi and postdoctoral researcher Tae Woo Kim combined cheap, oxide-based materials to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gases using solar energy with a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 1.7 percent, the highest reported for any oxide-based photoelectrode system.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kyoung-Shin Choi
kschoi@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-5859
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Microparticles show molecules their way
A team of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Michigan/USA has produced novel microparticles, whose surface consists of three chemically different segments. These segments can be provided with different (bio-) molecules. Thanks to the specific spatial orientation of the attached molecules, the microparticles are suited for innovative applications in medicine, biochemistry, and engineering. The researchers now report about their development in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
'Mission of firsts' showcased new range-safety technology at NASA Wallops
Range safety officers used the ORS-3 mission, run by the US military's Operationally Responsive Space Office, to carry out the first of three planned certification tests of a new technology that promises to eventually eliminate the need for expensive down-range tracking and command infrastructure to manually terminate rockets if they veer off course.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Advanced Energy Materials
Vibration energy the secret to self-powered electronics
A multi-university team of engineers has developed what could be a promising solution for charging smartphone batteries on the go -- without the need for an electrical cord.

Contact: Xudong Wang
xudong@engr.wisc.edu
608-890-2667
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Physical Review Letters
Nanoscale pillars could radically improve conversion of heat to electricity
University of Colorado Boulder scientists have found a creative way to radically improve thermoelectric materials, a finding that could one day lead to the development of improved solar panels, more energy-efficient cooling equipment, and even the creation of new devices that could turn the vast amounts of heat wasted at power plants into more electricity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mahmoud Hussein
mih@colorado.edu
303-492-3177
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Engineer honored for pioneering graphene research
Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering, has been elected a fellow of the Materials Research Society. He is the first fellow from UC Riverside.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Science
Scientists create powerful artificial muscle with fishing line
Researchers are using fibers from fishing line and sewing thread to create inexpensive artificial muscles that could be used in medical devices, humanoid robots, prosthetic limbs, or woven into fabrics.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Science
UT Dallas-led team makes powerful muscles from fishing line and sewing thread
An international team led by the University of Texas at Dallas has discovered that ordinary fishing line and sewing thread can be cheaply converted to powerful artificial muscles. The new muscles can lift a hundred times more weight and generate a hundred times higher mechanical power than the same length and weight of human muscle. Per weight, they can generate 7.1 horsepower per kilogram, about the same mechanical power as a jet engine.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Using holograms to improve electronic devices
A team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering and Russian Academy of Science have demonstrated a new type of holographic memory device that could provide unprecedented data storage capacity and data processing capabilities in electronic devices.
National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nano Letters
Making nanoelectronics last longer for medical devices, 'cyborgs'
The debut of cyborgs who are part human and part machine may be a long way off, but researchers say they now may be getting closer. In a study published in American Chemical Society's journal Nano Letters, they report development of a coating that makes nanoelectronics much more stable in conditions mimicking those in the human body. The advance could also aid in the development of very small implanted medical devices for monitoring health and disease.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
ACS Nano
Advance in energy storage could speed up development of next-gen electronics
Electronics are getting smaller all the time, but there's a limit to how tiny they can get with today's materials. Researchers now say, however, that they have developed a way to shrink capacitors -- key components that store energy -- even further, which could accelerate the development of more compact, high-performance next-gen devices. The study appears in the journal ACS Nano.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Gecko-inspired adhesion: Self-cleaning and reliable
Geckos outclass adhesive tapes in one respect: Even after repeated contact with dirt and dust do their feet perfectly adhere to smooth surfaces. Researchers of KIT and the Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, have developed the first adhesive tape that does not only adhere to a surface as reliably as the toes of a gecko, but also possesses similar self-cleaning properties. The results are published in the Interface journal of the British Royal Society.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
eLife
Nitrogen-tracking tools for better crops and less pollution
As every gardner knows, nitrogen is crucial for a plant's growth. But nitrogen absorption is inefficient. This means that on the scale of food crops, adding significant levels of nitrogen to the soil through fertilizer presents a number of problems, particularly river and groundwater pollution. As a result, finding a way to improve nitrogen uptake in agricultural products could improve yields and decrease risks to environmental and human health.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Wolf Frommer
wfrommer@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x208
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Nature Chemistry
Artificial cells and salad dressing
A University of California, Riverside assistant professor of engineering is among a group of researchers that have made important discoveries regarding the behavior of a synthetic molecular oscillator, which could serve as a timekeeping device to control artificial cells.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Nature Chemistry
Artificial leaf jumps developmental hurdle
Along with colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory, ASU scientists have reported advances toward perfecting an artificial leaf that uses solar energy to convert water cheaply and efficiently into hydrogen and oxygen. This development has the potential to sustainably harness the energy needed to provide the food, fuel and fiber that human needs are increasingly demanding.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, MGE@MSA

Contact: Jenny Green
jenny.green@asu.edu
480-965-1430
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
ACS Nano
Nanodiamond-embedded contact lenses may improve glaucoma treatment
Glaucoma is a pervasive disorder that occurs when there is a buildup of pressure in the eye. If left untreated, this can damage the optic nerve, resulting in vision loss. Bioengineers at the University of California Los Angeles School of Dentistry have developed a nanodiamond-embedded contact lens that may improve glaucoma treatment by localizing and sustaining drug release that can be triggered using tears. The researchers showed that the nanodiamonds even improved lens durability while maintaining wear comfort.

Contact: Brianna Deane
bdeane@dentistry.ucla.edu
310-206-0835
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Nano Letters
Ion beams pave way to new kinds of valves for use in spintronics
Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf tested a new approach to fabricating spin valves. Using ion beams, they structured an iron aluminium alloy in such a way as to subdivide the material into individually magnetizable regions at the nanometer scale. The alloy functions as a spin valve, which is of interest for use in spintronics. Not only does this technology use electron charge for purposes of information storage and processing, it also draws on its inherent magnetic properties (that is, its spin).

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Showing releases 776-800 out of 1733.

<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>