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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1673.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
Nature Materials
New twist in the graphene story
Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Advanced Light Source, have discovered that in the making of bilayer graphene, a tiny structural twist arises that can lead to surprisingly strong changes in the material's electronic properties.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Aug-2013
Nature Materials
Computer simulations reveal universal increase in electrical conductivity
Computer simulations have revealed how the electrical conductivity of many materials increases with a strong electrical field in a universal way. This development could have significant implications for practical systems in electrochemistry, biochemistry, electrical engineering and beyond.

Contact: David Weston
d.weston@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83844
University College London

Public Release: 11-Aug-2013
Nature Photonics
Device for capturing signatures uses tiny LEDs created with piezo-phototronic effect
Georgia Tech researchers want to put your signature up in lights. Using thousands of nanometer-scale wires, the researchers have developed a sensor device that converts mechanical pressure -- from a signature or a fingerprint -- directly into light signals that can be captured and processed optically.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 9-Aug-2013
Nanodrug targeting breast cancer cells from the inside adds weapon: Immune system attack
A unique nanoscale drug that can carry a variety of weapons and sneak into cancer cells to break them down from the inside has a new component: a protein that stimulates the immune system to attack HER2-positive breast cancer cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Aug-2013
Small
Chemists develop 'fresh, new' approach to making alloy nanomaterials
Chemists at Syracuse University have figured out how to synthesize nanomaterials with stainless steel-like interfaces. Their discovery may change how the form and structure of nanomaterials are manipulated, particularly those used for gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis and lithium-ion batteries.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 9-Aug-2013
ACS Nano
Chemists design 'smart' nanoparticles to improve drug delivery, DNA self-assembly
A team of chemists in SU's College of Arts and Scientists has used a temperature-sensitive polymer to regulate DNA interactions in both a DNA-mediated assembly system and a DNA-encoded drug-delivery system. Their findings, led by associate professor Mathew M. Maye and graduate students Kristen Hamner and Colleen Alexander, may improve how nanomaterials self-assemble into functional devices and how anticancer drugs, including doxorubicin, are delivered into the body.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 9-Aug-2013
New book by Wayne State professor explores health at the nano scale
A Wayne State University School of Medicine professor has published a book that covers new advances in nano cell biology, nano medicine and imaging modalities.

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 8-Aug-2013
Science
A path to better MTV-MOFs
A team of Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers have developed a method for accurately predicting the ability of MTV-MOFs (multivariate metal organic frameworks) to scrub carbon dioxide from the exhaust gases of fossil fuel power plants.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Aug-2013
Scientific Reports
Pass the salt: Common condiment could enable new high-tech industry
Chemists have identified a compound that could significantly reduce the cost and potentially enable the mass commercial production of silicon nanostructures -- materials that have huge potential in everything from electronics to biomedicine and energy storage. This extraordinary compound is called table salt.
Oregon State University

Contact: David Xiulei Ji
david.ji@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6798
Oregon State University

Public Release: 8-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Aug. 8, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Aug. 8, 2013, in the JCI: Engineered rice protects against rotavirus infection;Tumor microenvironment allows cancer cells to hide from the immune system;Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity;Age-dependent hepatic lymphoid organization directs successful immunity to hepatitis B;Increased Fanconi C expression contributes to the emergency granulopoiesis response;Nanoparticle-based flow virometry for the analysis of individual virions
National Institutes of Health, CREST, US Department of Defense, Komen for the Cure

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 8-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Molecules form 2-D patterns never before observed
Tessellation patterns that have fascinated mathematicians since Kepler worked out their systematics 400 years ago -- and that more recently have caught the eye of artists and crystallographers -- can now be seen in the laboratory. They first took shape on a surface more perfectly two-dimensional than any sheet of paper, a single layer of atoms and molecules atop an atomically smooth substrate. Physicists coaxed these so-called Kepler tilings "onto the page" through guided self-assembly of nanostructures.
European Research Council, German Research Foundation, TUM-IAS

Contact: Patrick Regan
regan@tum.de
49-016-242-79876
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 7-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Carbon under pressure exhibits interesting traits
High pressures and temperatures cause materials to exhibit unusual properties, some of which can be special. Understanding such new properties is important for developing new materials for desired industrial uses and also for understanding the interior of Earth, where everything is hot and squeezed.

Contact: Nicole Cassis
ncassis@asu.edu
602-710-7169
Arizona State University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2013
Nature Nanotechnology
DNA nanorobots find and tag cellular targets
Researchers have created a fleet of molecular "robots" that can home in on specific human cells and mark them for drug therapy or destruction. The nanorobots -- a collection of DNA molecules, some attached to antibodies -- were designed to seek a specific set of human blood cells and attach a fluorescent tag to the cell surfaces. Details of the system were published July 28, 2013, in the online edition of Nature Nanotechnology.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Aug-2013
Nature Nanotechnology
Magnetic switching simplified
An international team of researchers has described a new physical effect that could be used to develop more efficient magnetic chips for information processing. The quantum mechanical effect makes it easier to produce spin-polarized currents necessary for the switching of magnetically stored information.
European Research Council, European Commission Under the Seventh Framework Programme and others

Contact: Angela Wenzik
a.wenzik@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-6048
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 7-Aug-2013
Scientific Reports
Self-healing solar cells 'channel' natural processes
To understand how solar cells heal themselves, look no further than the nearest tree leaf or the back of your hand. The "branching" vascular channels that circulate life-sustaining nutrients throughout leaves and hands serve as the inspiration for NC State University solar cells that can restore themselves efficiently and inexpensively.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Dr. Orlin Velev
odvelev@ncsu.edu
919-513-4318
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2013
Grant to support commercialization of technology to repair skin injuries
A Marshall University scientist has been awarded a $20,000 grant to help bring to market a technology he has developed for repairing skin injuries.
Chemical Alliance Zone Chemicals and Materials Commercialization Fund

Contact: Ginny Painter
ginny.painter@marshall.edu
304-746-1964
Marshall University Research Corporation

Public Release: 6-Aug-2013
Nature Materials
Size matters in nanocrystals' ability to adsorb/release gases
More efficient catalytic converters on autos, improved batteries and more sensitive gas sensors are some of the potential benefits of a new system that can directly measure the manner in which nanocrystals adsorb and release hydrogen and other gases.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 6-Aug-2013
Advanced Materials
Battery design gets boost from aligned carbon nanotubes
A flexible nano-scaffold could help make rechargeable lithium ion batteries last longer. Applications range from improved cell phone batteries to electric cars that can travel farther on a charge.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund

Contact: Dr. Philip Bradford
philip_bradford@ncsu.edu
919-515-1866
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 6-Aug-2013
High temperature capacitor could pave the way for electric vehicle
Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory are helping to create electronics capabilities for electric vehicles, with the development of a high temperature capacitor.

Contact: David Lewis
david@proofcommunication.com
44-845-680-1865
National Physical Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2013
Review of Scientific Instruments
Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors push timing envelope
The Large Area Picosecond Photodetector collaboration has developed big detectors that push the timing envelope, measuring the speed of particles with a precision down to trillionths of a second.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 6-Aug-2013
Physical Review Letters
Quantum communication controlled by resonance in 'artificial atoms'
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, together with colleagues in the US and Australia, have developed a method to control a quantum bit for electronic quantum communication in a series of quantum dots, which behave like artificial atoms in the solid state. The results have been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-35-32-53-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 5-Aug-2013
Langmuir
Making a mini Mona Lisa
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have "painted" the Mona Lisa on a substrate surface approximately 30 microns in width -- or one-third the width of a human hair. The team's creation, the "Mini Lisa," demonstrates a technique that could potentially be used to achieve nanomanufacturing of devices because the team was able to vary the surface concentration of molecules on such short-length scales.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Aug-2013
Advanced Functional Materials
Understanding interface properties of graphene paves way for new applications
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Texas have revealed more about graphene's mechanical properties and demonstrated a technique to improve the stretchability of graphene -- developments that should help engineers and designers come up with new technologies that make use of the material.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Aug-2013
Chemical Communications
Cobalt replacements make solar cells more sustainable
Researchers at the University of Basel have successfully replaced the rare element iodine in copper-based dye-sensitized solar cells by the more abundant element cobalt, taking a step forward in the development of environmentally friendly energy production. The journal Chemical Communications has published the results of these so-called Cu-Co cells.
European Research Council, Swiss National Science Foundation, University of Basel

Contact: Reto Caluori
reto.caluori@unibas.ch
41-612-672-495
University of Basel

Public Release: 1-Aug-2013
Biomicrofluidics
Catching cancer early by chasing it
Reaching a clinic in time to receive an early diagnosis for cancer -- when the disease is most treatable -- is a global problem. And now a team of Chinese researchers proposes a global solution: have a user-friendly diagnostic device travel to the patient, anywhere in the world.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1673.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>