News Tips from ACS NANO DOE Research News Site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
27-May-2016 02:34
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Options

Portal Home

Glossary

Background Articles

Research Papers

Meetings

Links & Resources

Essays

Online Chats

RSS Feed

Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1864.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Researchers design placenta-on-a-chip to better understand pregnancy
National Institutes of Health researchers and their colleagues have developed a 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy. The device was designed to imitate, on a micro-level, the structure and function of the placenta and model the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus. This prototype is one of the latest in a series of organ-on-a-chip technologies developed to accelerate biomedical advances.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital Research Fund, National Research Foundation of Korea, National Medical Center & Asan Medical Center in South Korea

Contact: Katie Rush
katie.rush@nih.gov
301-496-9066
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
Staying cool: Saharan silver ants
Researchers have discovered two strategies that enable Saharan silver ants to stay cool in one of the world's hottest environments. They are the first to demonstrate that the ants use a coat of uniquely shaped hairs to control electromagnetic waves over an extremely broad range from the solar spectrum to the thermal radiation spectrum and that different physical mechanisms are used in different spectral bands to realize the same biological function of reducing body temperature.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials
In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights, published in the June 19 issue of the journal Science, could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Fundamentals of materials modeling for metals processing technologies
World Scientific's latest book on 'Fundamentals of Materials Modelling for Metals Processing Technologies: Theories and Applications' comprehensively introduces the unique theory developed over years of research on materials and process modelling and its application in metal forming technologies.

Contact: Jason CJ
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new look at surface chemistry
A multi-institutional team of researchers, including scientists from Berkeley Lab have used a new scanning electron microscopy technique to resolve the unique atomic structure at the surface of a material. This new technique holds promise for the study of catalysis, corrosion and other critical chemical reactions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new way to image surfaces on the nanoscale
A multi-institutional team of scientists, including a Northwestern University professor of materials science and engineering, has taken an important step in understanding where atoms are located on the surfaces of rough materials, information that could be very useful in diverse commercial applications, such as developing green energy and understanding how materials rust. The team has developed a new imaging technique that uses atomic resolution secondary electron images in a quantitative way to determine the arrangement of atoms on the surface.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science, Material Science and Engineering Division

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Toward nanorobots that swim through blood to deliver drugs (video)
Someday, treating patients with nanorobots could become standard practice to deliver medicine specifically to parts of the body affected by disease. But merely injecting drug-loaded nanoparticles might not always be enough to get them where they need to go. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters the development of new nanoswimmers that can move easily through body fluids to their targets.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
New Materials From Trees
Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3-D
A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3-D bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material. The effect is that cellulose and other raw material based on wood will be able to compete with fossil-based plastics and metals in the ongoing additive manufacturing revolution, which started with the introduction of the 3-D printer.

Contact: Paul Gatenholm
paul.gatenholm@chalmers.se
46-707-535-750
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Nanoparticles can be intrinsically left- and right-handed
A team of scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College Dublin published first experimental results showing that ordinary nanocrystals possess intrinsic chirality and can be produced under normal conditions as a half-and-half mixture of mirror images of each other. The discovery of this fundamental property in nanocrystals opens new horizons in nano- and bio-technology and medicine, for instance, for such applications as targeted drug delivery. The results of the study were published in Nano Letters.

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
dvmalkov@corp.ifmo.ru
7-953-377-5508
ITMO University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Diamonds are for temperature
Luminescent signals from green glowing diamond defects could monitor temperature in a range of physical and biological systems with unprecedented versatility.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Penn researchers develop a new type of gecko-like gripper
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are developing a new kind of gripper, motivated by the ability of animals like the gecko to grip and release surfaces. Like the gecko, the gripper has 'tunable adhesion,' meaning that, despite having no moving parts, its effective stickiness can be tuned from strong to weak. Unlike the gecko and other artificial imitators that rely on structures with complex shapes, the Penn team's gripper uses a simpler, two-material structure that is easier to mass-produce.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Education

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Materials
Buckle up for fast ionic conduction
ETH material engineers found that the performance of ion-conducting ceramic membranes that are so important in industry depends largely on their strain and buckling profiles. For the first time, scientists can now selectively manipulate the buckling profile, and thus the physical properties, allowing new technical applications of these membranes.

Contact: Dr. Jennifer Rupp
jennifer.rupp@mat.ethz.ch
41-792-900-697
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Researchers grind nanotubes to get nanoribbons
Researchers on three continents discover that functionalized carbon nanotubes, when ground together, react and unzip into nanoribbons. The all solid-state process suggests that nanostructures may serve as templates for controlled chemical reactions.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, CAPES, and others

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
ACS Nano
A KAIST research team develops the first flexible phase-change random access memory
Recently, a team led by professors Keon Jae Lee and Yeon Sik Jung of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at KAIST has developed the first flexible PRAM enabled by self-assembled block copolymer (BCP) silica nanostructures with an ultralow current operation (below one quarter of conventional PRAM without BCP) on plastic substrates.

Contact: Lan Yoon
hlyoon@kaist.ac.kr
82-102-539-4303
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
World's thinnest lightbulb -- graphene gets bright!
Led by James Hone's group at Columbia Engineering, a team of scientists from Columbia, SNU, and KRISS demonstrated -- for the first time -- an on-chip visible light source using graphene, an atomically thin and perfectly crystalline form of carbon, as a filament. They attached small strips of graphene to metal electrodes, suspended the strips above the substrate, and passed a current through the filaments to cause them to heat up. (Nature Nanotechnology AOP June 15)
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, National Research Foundation of Korea, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
Science Express
Argonne scientists announce first room-temperature magnetic skyrmion bubbles
Researchers at UCLA and Argonne National Laboratory announced today a new method for creating magnetic skyrmion bubbles at room temperature. The bubbles, a physics phenomenon thought to be an option for more energy-efficient and compact electronics, can be created with simple equipment and common materials.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Louise Lerner
media@anl.gov
630-252-5526
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists tune X-rays with tiny mirrors
Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have created a new way of manipulating high-intensity X-rays, which will allow researchers to select extremely brief but precise X-ray bursts for their experiments.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
media@anl.gov
630-252-5593
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
2015 TechConnect World Innovation events
Lehigh University researchers unveil engineering innovations at TechConnect 2015
Lehigh University engineers, materials scientists and chemists will present their innovative breakthroughs to a national showcase of investors and industrial partners at the TechConnect 2015 World Innovation Conference in Washington on June 14-17. Working at the junction of engineering and health, the Lehigh innovations include a nanoscale device that captures tumor cells in the blood, a bioengineered enzyme that scrubs microbial biofilms and the creation of a safe and efficient chemical reagent that is stable at room temperature.

Contact: Jordan Reese
jor310@lehigh.edu
610-758-6656
Lehigh University

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
$8.5 million grant for developing nano printing technology
Northwestern University has received a five-year, $8.5 million grant from the US Department of Defense's competitive Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative program to develop a '4-dimensional printer' -- the next generation of printing technology for the scientific world. Once developed, the 4-D printer, operating on the nanoscale, will be used to construct new devices for research in chemistry, materials sciences and US defense-related areas that could lead to new chemical and biological sensors, catalysts, microchip designs and more.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Defense

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
Molecular Cell
A protein provides emergency aid
Small heat shock proteins ensure that other proteins do not clot, allowing the cell to survive stress. Defects in these 'small helpers' are associated with medical conditions like cataracts and cancer. Now, scientists at the Technische Universität München have characterized a small heat shock protein responsible for embryonic development in the Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. Presumably, a similar protein exists also in humans.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section B
Framework materials yield to pressure
High pressure has become an indispensable research tool in the quest for novel functional materials. High-pressure crystallographic studies on non-porous framework materials based on coordination compounds are markedly on the rise, enabling the unraveling of structural phenomena and taking us a step closer to the derivation of structure-property relationships.
DOE/Advanced Photon Source

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Science
Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to use tiny diamonds and graphene to give friction the slip, creating a new material combination that demonstrates the rare phenomenon of 'superlubricity.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
media@anl.gov
630-252-5593
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
ACS Nano
Rice researchers make ultrasensitive conductivity measurements
Researchers at Rice University have discovered a new way to measure the conductivity of electronic components at optical frequencies for high-speed, nanoscale device components ultimately as small as a single molecule.
Robert A. Welch Foundation, DOD/National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship Program, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and US Army

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
Nano Letters
Strong teeth: Nanostructures under stress make teeth crack resistant
Human teeth have to serve for a lifetime, despite being subjected to huge forces. But the high failure resistance of dentin in teeth is not fully understood. An interdisciplinary team led by scientists of Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin has now analyzed the complex structure of dentin. At the synchrotron sources BESSY II at HZB, Berlin, Germany, and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF, Grenoble, France, they could reveal that the mineral particles are precompressed.

Contact: Dr. Paul Zaslansky
paul.zaslansky@charite.de
49-304-505-59589
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Journal of Nanoparticle Research
NIST's 'nano-raspberries' could bear fruit in fuel cells
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a fast, simple process for making platinum 'nano-raspberries' -- microscopic clusters of nanoscale particles of the precious metal. The berry-like shape is significant because it has a high surface area, which is helpful in the design of catalysts. Even better news for industrial chemists: the researchers figured out when and why the berry clusters clump into larger bunches of 'nano-grapes.'

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1864.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>