News Tips from ACS NANO DOE Research News Site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
28-Nov-2015 06:22
US Eastern Time




Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books



Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation


Submit a Calendar Item


Links & Resources


RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On


Portal Home


Background Articles

Research Papers


Links & Resources


Online Chats

RSS Feed


News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1802.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
The mysterious 'action at a distance' between liquid containers
For several years, it has been known that superfluid helium housed in reservoirs located next to each other acts collectively, even when the channels connecting the reservoirs are too narrow and too long to allow for substantial flow. A new theoretical model reveals that the phenomenon of mysterious communication 'at a distance' between fluid reservoirs is much more common than previously thought.

Contact: Anna Maciołek
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Van der Waals force re-measured
Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. They demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast. Their findings could help to improve simulation methods for chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science.

Contact: Tobias Schloesser
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
'Giant' charge density disturbances discovered in nanomaterials
Scientists in Jülich have, with the help of computer simulations, discovered a combination of materials that strengthens the so-called Friedel oscillations and bundles them, as if with a lens, in different directions. With a range of 50 nanometers, these 'giant anisotropic charge density oscillations' are many times greater than normal and open up new possibilities in the field of nanoelectronics to exchange or filter magnetic information.
Helmholtz Young Investigators Groups

Contact: Angela Wenzik
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Stanford engineers invent high-tech mirror to beam heat away from buildings into space
Stanford engineers have invented a material designed to help cool buildings. The material reflects incoming sunlight, and it sends heat from inside the structure directly into space as infrared radiation.

Contact: Tom Abate
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
NASA's Webb Telescope mirror tripod in action
Setting up NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's secondary mirror in space will require special arms that resemble a tripod. NASA recently completed a test of the tripod to ensure it would function properly in space.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals
Nanoporous metals -- foam-like materials that have some degree of air vacuum in their structure -- have a wide range of applications because of their superior qualities.

Contact: Ken Ma
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists bind single-atom sheets with the same force geckos use to climb walls
The approach is to design synergistic materials by combining two single-atom thick sheets, for example, that act as a photovoltaic cell as well as a light-emitting diode, converting energy between electricity and radiation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Two Rutgers professors named fellows of top national science association
Two Rutgers professors are among 401 members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science who have been elevated to the rank of fellow. The pre-eminent national organization selects its fellows based on their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

Contact: Carl Blesch
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists and chemists work to improve digital memory technology
A team led by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers study graphene and ammonia to develop high-speed, high-capacity random access memory.

Contact: Alexei Gruverman
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Two Kansas State University researchers named AAAS fellows
A physicist and an entomologist have been named 2014 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, or AAAS, the world's largest scientific society.
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Greg Tammen
Kansas State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Research reveals how our bodies keep unwelcome visitors out of cell nuclei
The structure of pores found in cell nuclei has been uncovered by a UCL-led team of scientists, revealing how they selectively block certain molecules from entering, protecting genetic material and normal cell functions. The discovery could lead to the development of new drugs against viruses that target the cell nucleus and new ways of delivering gene therapies, say the scientists behind the study.
European Molecular Biology Organization, Kazakh Ministry of Education and Science, Sackler Foundation, UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Siobhan Pipa
University College London

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
NRL scientists discover novel metamaterial properties within hexagonal boron nitride
Researchers have demonstrated that confined surface phonon polaritons within hexagonal boron nitride exhibit unique metamaterial properties that enable novel nanoscale optical devices.

Contact: Daniel Parry
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Universities of Mainz and Nagoya finalize exchange program for students, researchers in physics
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and Nagoya University finalize exchange program for students and researchers in physics.

Contact: Klaus Wendt
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays
University of Utah engineers have developed a polarizing filter that allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Utah Science Technology and Research Economic Development Initiative

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
University of Utah

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
NTU Singapore develops novel 2-in-1 biomarker and drug delivery system
Nanyang Technological University has invented a unique biomarker with two exceptional functions.

Contact: Lester Kok
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Thin film produces new chemistry in 'nanoreactor'
Physicists at the University of Groningen led by Professor of Functional Nanomaterials Beatriz Noheda have discovered a new manganese compound that is produced by tension in the crystal structure of terbium manganese oxide. The technique they used to create this new material could open the way to new nanoscale circuits. Their findings were published on Nov. 20, 2014 in the journal Nature.
NanoNextNl, FOM Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter.

Contact: Beatriz Noheda
University of Groningen

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Chemistry
UCLA biochemists build largest synthetic molecular 'cage' ever
University of California Los Angeles biochemists have created the largest protein ever that self-assembles into a molecular cage. Their designed protein, which does not exist in nature, is hundreds of times smaller than a human cell. The research could lead to 'synthetic vaccines' that protect people from the flu, HIV and perhaps other diseases. It could also lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells and the creation of new nano-scale materials.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Two sensors in one
MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
University of Houston researcher honored for work in nanomaterials
Debora Rodrigues, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Houston, has received the Emerging Investigator award from the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization. Rodrigues has worked with nanomaterials since arriving at UH in 2010, using the technology to develop new methods for water purification and treatment. In addition to her research, she was recognized for her work with students and her outreach to other educators.
Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization

Contact: Jeannie Kever
University of Houston

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Clean energy 'bio batteries' a step closer
University of East Anglia researchers are a step closer to enhancing the generation of clean energy from bacteria. Research shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulating areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of electrically conductive 'stepping stones.' This natural process could be used to improve 'bio batteries' for portable technology such as mobile phones and laptops powered by human or animal waste.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Better micro-actuators to transport materials in liquids
Researchers have developed improved forms of tiny magnetic actuators thanks to new materials and a microscopic 3-D printing technology.

Contact: Press Office
ETH Zurich

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1802.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>