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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1806.

<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Modern Physics Letters B
New family of materials for energy-efficient information storage and processing
Hexagonal rare earth ferrites have been demonstrated to exhibit both spontaneous electric and magnetic dipole moments (as a rare case), which may enable couplings of the static electric and magnetic fields in these materials, suggesting application in energy-efficient information storage and processing.
Nebraska EPSCoR

Contact: Philly Lim
World Scientific

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
NSF funds new method for making materials that can make lighter, more efficient vehicles
Diana Lados, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and founding director of the university's Integrative Materials Design Center, has received a three-year, $424,000 award from the National Science Foundation to support the development of a new way to manufacture metal-ceramic composites, which can be used to make vehicles lighter and more energy efficient, while significantly increasing their performance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Dorsey
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
​NTU spin-off achieves breakthrough with innovative multifunction membranes
A young startup at Nanyang Technological University has developed a first-of-its-kind multifunction water filtration membrane.

Contact: Lester Kok
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Researchers create world's largest DNA origami
Researchers have created the world's largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
New species of electrons can lead to better computing
Electrons that break the rules and move perpendicular to the applied electric field could be the key to delivering next generation, low-energy computers, a collaboration of scientists from the University of Manchester and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
University of Manchester

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene paints a corrosion-free future
A thin layer of graphene paint can make impermeable and chemically resistant coatings which could be used for packaging to keep food fresh for longer and protect metal structures against corrosion, new findings from the University of Manchester show.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
University of Manchester

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
The sound of an atom has been captured
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology are first to show the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light. The results will be published in the journal Science.
Swedish Research Council, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, European Research Council, Wenner-Gren Foundations

Contact: Johanna Wilde
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Excitonic dark states shed light on TMDC atomic layers
Berkeley Lab researchers believe they have uncovered the secret behind the unusual optoelectronic properties of single atomic layers of TMDC materials, the two-dimensional semiconductors that hold great promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
UT Arlington research uses nanotechnology to help cool electrons with no external sources
A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Herb Booth
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
Advanced light source sets microscopy record
Working at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers used 'soft' X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size. This resolution is the highest ever achieved with X-ray microscopy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Penn engineers advance understanding of graphene's friction properties
On the macroscale, adding fluorine atoms to carbon-based materials makes for water-repellant, non-stick surfaces, such as Teflon. However, on the nanoscale, adding fluorine to graphene had been reported to vastly increase the friction experienced when sliding against the material. Through a combination of physical experiments and atomistic simulations, a University of Pennsylvania team has discovered the mechanism behind this surprising finding, which could help researchers better design and control the surface properties of new materials.
National Science Foundation, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Evan Lerner
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
How skin falls apart: Pathology of autoimmune skin disease is revealed at the nanoscale
University at Buffalo researchers and colleagues studying a rare, blistering disease have discovered new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University at Buffalo

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New method to detect prize particle for future quantum computing
Research published today in the journal Nature Communications uncovers a new method to detect Majorana particles, a key element for a next-generation quantum computing platform.

Contact: Amy Sutton
University of Surrey

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
Two-dimensional electron liquids
Using an overlying bath of ionic liquid, a piece of superconductor -- divided by an insulating strip -- supports narrow tunnels which permit currents to flow between.
Air Force Office of Science Research, US Army Research Office, and others

Contact: Philllip F. Schewe
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Professor Federico Rosei named to the Royal Society of Canada
Federico Rosei, professor and director at the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre, has been elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of his outstanding achievements and contribution to the advancement of knowledge in applied sciences and engineering. This election by one's peers is the highest honor bestowed on a Canadian academic in the arts, letters, and sciences.

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
A single molecule diode opens up a new era for sustainable and miniature electronics
In the domain of electronics, the continuous quest for miniaturisation is pushing us towards the creation of devices which are continuously becoming smaller and more efficient. This study, published in Nature Communication, reveals exceptional electronic properties for a newly synthesized molecule, given it conducts electrical power into one direction but not into the opposite sense. It behaves in other words as a diode, but at the scale of a molecule!
National Fund for Scientific Research, sponsored by the Communaute´ Française de Belgique, M. de Merre Prize of Louvain

Contact: Sorin Melinte
Université catholique de Louvain

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New glaucoma cause discovered
Scientists have discovered a novel cause of glaucoma in an animal model, and related to their findings, are now developing an eye drop aimed at curing the disease. They believe their findings will be important to human glaucoma. A cure for glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the US, has been elusive because the basis of the disease is poorly understood.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
Northwestern University

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
New Journal of Physics
Graphene gets a 'cousin' in the shape of germanene
A team of European researchers has become one of the first groups to successfully synthesize the 2-D material germanene.

Contact: Michael Bishop
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
UT Arlington genomic data-mining framework to aid manufacturers discover desired materials
A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Methods
New knowledge of cannabis paves the way for drug development
Revolutionary nanotechnology method could help improve the development of new medicine and reduce costs. Researchers from the Nano-Science Center and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new screening method that makes it possible to study cell membrane proteins that bind drugs, such as cannabis and adrenaline, while reducing the consumption of precious samples by a billion times.
Danish Strategic Research Council, Lundbeck Foundation

Contact: Rikke Bøyesen
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Layered graphene sandwich for next generation electronics
Sandwiching layers of graphene with white graphene could produce designer materials capable of creating high-frequency electronic devices, University of Manchester scientists have found.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
University of Manchester

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Doped graphene nanoribbons with potential
Graphene is a semiconductor when prepared as an ultra-narrow ribbon -- although the material is actually a conductive material. Researchers from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now developed a new method to selectively dope graphene molecules with nitrogen atoms.

Contact: Martina Peter
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Light detector to revolutionize night vision technology
Researchers have developed a light detector that could revolutionize chemical sensing and night vision technology.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
Monash University

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
Nature Chemistry
Continuing Bragg legacy of structure determination
Over 100 years since the Nobel Prize-winning father and son team Sir William and Sir Lawrence Bragg pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structure, University of Adelaide researchers have made significant new advances in the field.

Contact: Chris Sumby
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Magnetic nanocubes self-assemble into helical superstructures
Collaborating with nanochemists led by Rafal Klajn at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, who found that magnetite nanocubes can self-assemble into helical superstructures under certain conditions, UIC theoretical chemist Petr Kral and his students simulated the phenomenon and explained the conditions under which it can occur.
Israel Science Foundation, G.M.J. Schmidt-Minerva Center for Supramolecular Architectures, Minerva Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
University of Illinois at Chicago

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1806.

<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>