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DOE SCIENCE NEWS BY TOPIC: Computational Sciences
Driven by rapid technological advances within the past two decades, computing and high-speed networking have emerged as powerful tools for science and are even changing the ways in which modern science is conducted. DOE is a national leader in the scientific computing field–supporting fundamental research in advanced scientific computing, applied mathematics, computer science, and networking. The DOE computational infrastructure provides world-class, high-performance computational and networking tools that enable scientific, energy, environmental, and national security research.

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Features

ORNL researchers develop 'Autotune' software to make it quicker to model energy use of buildings

ORNL researchers develop 'Autotune' software to make it quicker to model energy use of buildings

Building Energy Modeling uses computer simulations to estimate energy use and guide the design of new buildings as well as energy improvements to existing buildings.

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Interface surprises may motivate novel oxide electronic devices

Complex oxides have long tantalized the materials science community for their promise in next-generation energy and information technologies.

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Interface surprises may motivate novel oxide electronic devices

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Lab News Releases
29-Sep-2014
Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
Brown University

29-Sep-2014
Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

24-Sep-2014
2-D materials' crystalline defects key to new properties
Penn State

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