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Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 101 stories.
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31-Jul-2014
Giant electromagnet completes its journey, moves into its new home at Fermilab
One year ago, the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet arrived at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois after traveling 3,200 miles over land and sea from Long Island, N.Y. This week, the magnet took the final few steps of that journey, moving across the Fermilab site and into the new building that now houses it.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jun-2014
Massive 30-ton MicroBooNE particle detector moved into place, will see neutrinos this year
On Monday, June 23, the next phase of neutrino physics at Fermilab fell (gently) into place. The MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton, 40-foot-long cylindrical metal tank designed to detect ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was carefully transported by truck across the US Department of Energy's Fermilab site, from the warehouse building it was constructed in to the experimental hall three miles away.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jun-2014
MINOS result narrows field for sterile neutrinos
A new result from the long-running MINOS experiment announced this week severely limits the area in which sterile neutrinos could be found and casts more doubt on whether they exist at all.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

8-May-2014
Scientists to map universe in 3-D HD
In a few years, scientists will come out with a new map of a third of the sky, one that will go deeper and bring that depth into sharper focus than any survey has yet achieved. It will pinpoint in three dimensions the locations of 25 million galaxies and quasars, pulling back the curtains on the history of the universe's expansion over more than half of the age of the universe.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Apr-2014
Is the universe balanced on a pinhead?
Scientists have known the mass of the heaviest fundamental particle, the top quark, since 1995. But recent, more precise measurements of this mass have revived an old question: Why is it so huge? No one is sure, but it might be a sign that our universe is inherently unstable. Or it might be a sign that some factor we don't yet understand is keeping us in balance.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-Mar-2014
The instrumentation frontier
Devices designed for science can open both the wonders of the cosmos and new possibilities in everyday life.

Contact: Andre Salles
asalles@fnal.gov
630-840-6733
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2014
CDMS result covers new ground in search for dark matter
Scientists looking for dark matter face a serious challenge: No one knows what dark matter particles look like. So their search covers a wide range of possible traits -- different masses, different probabilities of interacting with regular matter. Today, scientists on the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment, or CDMS, announced they have shifted the border of this search down to a dark-matter particle mass and rate of interaction that has never been probed.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kjepsen@fnal.gov
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Nov-2009
An electron zap turns flimsy plastic into sturdy shrink wrap
If you buy a Butterball turkey this Thanksgiving, you have particle accelerators to thank for its freshness. For decades now the food industry has used particle accelerators to produce the sturdy, heat-shrinkable film that Butterballs come wrapped in.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Jul-2009
Dark Energy Camera scans ancient skies
Scientists wonder why the universe is expanding ever faster. What mysterious force is at work? By recording the light from hundreds of millions of galaxies from a mountaintop in Chile, they hope to find out what's going on.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

6-Jan-2006
The search for extra dimensions
Although we now think of the universe as three bulky, nearly-flat dimensions, we might soon discover that the fabric of space-time consists of many more dimensions than we ever dreamed.

Contact: Kelen Tuttle
650-926-2585
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Nov-2005
Meet the grid
Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

12-Oct-2005
Super-fast super-sensitive detectors
Only detectors with the greatest precision capabilities will measure up to the machine seeking to explore supersymmetry, dark matter, the Higgs mechanism, and new physics that hasn't yet been imagined. Their shapes and configurations might be familiar, but their inner workings–the materials and electronics charged with creating views of new physics–will carry a symbolic branding: "Product of the 21st century."

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
In their hands: The future of particle physics
Particle physics is at a critical time, and its future depends on how well scientists can make their case to a diverse National Academy of Sciences panel.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
The compact linear collider
As the Global Design Effort for the proposed International Linear Collider starts to take shape, an international collaboration of scientists simultaneously works on an alternative linear collider technology that pushes physics and engineering to the edge.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Apr-2005
X-ray blaze on an invisible world
The way that a horse trots intrigued Leland Stanford. After a term as California's governor and with a fortune assembled from building the US transcontinental railway, Stanford lived the life of a country gentleman near his Palo Alto Stock Farm.

Contact: Heather Rock Woods
hrwoods@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Apr-2005
Science from a hole in the ground
When Alice famously went down the rabbit hole, she ended up in Wonderland. Now, a group of US scientists from fields as diverse as microbiology and particle physics, rock mechanics and molecular evolution are proposing to go down their own version of the rabbit hole into the scientific wonderland of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Beyond the standard model
At almost any particle physics conference, meeting, or lunch table, the phrase "physics beyond the Standard Model" is heard over and over again. What's wrong with the Standard Model, anyway? Why are physicists so sure that there is something beyond it? And why do they think they can find it anytime soon?

Contact: John Womersley
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Let it rain
Toward the end of a ten-year experiment in 1991, postdoc Hungye Dai of the University of Utah was puzzling over some really unusual data. The experiment was Fly's Eye, which pioneered a new method of studying ultra-high-energy cosmic rays by monitoring the faint flashes of ultraviolet light produced in the sky when the particles hit the upper atmosphere.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Sold on cold
One hot day in August, particle physicists turned cold. That's the day the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) announced the decision to pursue "cold" superconducting technology for what physicists hope will be the world's next big particle accelerator, the International Linear Collider. Going cold, instead of recommending a "warm" option that had also been under development, has far-reaching consequences for laboratories, scientists, industries and governments across the globe. What does "cold" mean, and why did particle physics choose superconducting technology?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Extreme neutrinos
Kurt Woschnagg has been waiting nine days to catch a plane to the South Pole. He flew for 15 hours from San Francisco to New Zealand, waited several days to spend another eight hours in a cargo plane to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, only to wait again for the weather to clear.

Contact: Katie Yurkewicz
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
The growth of inflation
It was a true Eureka moment if there ever was one. On the night of December 6, 1979, an obscure Stanford Linear Accelerator Center postdoc was up late, sweating over an even more obscure problem about particles called magnetic monopoles. Looking at his calculations the next day, the usually low-key Alan Guth annotated the words "Spectacular Realization" at the top of the page. Guth had discovered cosmic inflation, an idea which some have later called the most important in cosmology since the big bang.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

1-Mar-2004
Dance of the planes
Less than four years after breaking ground at Fermilab for an underground complex consisting of 4,000 feet of tunnels and two experimental halls, scientists of the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search collaboration are preparing for the first components of a 1,000-ton neutrino detector to go underground. Technicians will lower the first of 282 octagonal-shaped detector planes--each weighing more than a pickup truck--down a 350-foot shaft on the Fermilab site in March.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
The sensitive giant
CERN's Large Hadron Collider, set to begin operations later this decade, will boast four new detectors around its 16-mile ring. Fermilab is heavily involved in the Compact Muon Solenoid, but the LHC is constructing another huge multipurpose detector in competition for discovery of the Higgs particle and several other fundamental targets: ATLAS, A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS.

Contact: Matt Hutson
mhutson@fnal.gov
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 101 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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