U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 96 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

20-Sep-2002
New neutrino experiment at Fermilab goes live
Scientists of the Booster Neutrino Experiment collaboration announced on September 9 that a new detector at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has observed its first neutrino events.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Aug-2002
OSTP's Marburger visits Fermilab
I am personally excited about particle physics," John Marburger, the Bush Administration's director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, told a Fermilab audience earlier this month. Furthermore, he said, now is a great time to be a particle physicist.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Aug-2002
Interactions - Communicating particle physics in the 21st century
Physics is in crisis. We have lost our ideals and focus as a unified field. The reasons for this loss can be traced to recent history as well as to pressures currently felt within the physics community. Particle physics used to be the dominant area and had pride-of-place in our discipline. It was "basic" and "fundamental." It was exciting, with many great discoveries taking place and with a unified picture of the interactions emerging.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Aug-2002
Mission: Luminosity
The sign says it all about our mission for this critical time in the Beams Division and at Fermilab--we are focused on improving the performance of the Tevatron for Run II, almost to the exclusion of anything else. Lots of people have already told me how much they like it--an indication that people in the division and in the laboratory are committed to succeeding.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Aug-2002
Syracuse joins the search
The first chancellor of Syracuse University allowed his cow to graze on campus. But from those pastoral roots, the university has grown to be leader in the development of science and technology in New York state. In the 1980s, Syracuse launched one of the state's first Centers for Advanced Technology–the CASE Center--to revitalize local economic growth through technology. Last year, New York state was the second-largest sponsor, after the federal government, of research at the university.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Fermilab and LHC: A major stakeholder
The United States has a $531 million commitment to provide accelerator and detector components for the Large Hadron Collider, which is under construction at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and which will begin operations later this decade. With a major role in construction of the LHC accelerator and the CMS detector, Fermilab will be positioned for a major role in the emergent physics when LHC begins operating later this decade.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Measuring up
Physics is the science of measurement, and measurement relies on unchanging standards--the inch, the centimeter, the second, the electron volt. But what if a standard is distorted and unreliable? How can a measurement be accurate?

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Notes from underground
Neutrinos fly through the earth with the greatest of ease. In the blink of eye, they flit effortlessly through the planet's rocky crust at nearly the speed of light. Not so for the miners of generations past who dug their way, foot by backbreaking, dangerous foot, through the rock of Minnesota's Iron Range.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jun-2002
Particle physics made painless
When you're searching for something, you can usually count on finding it in the last place you look. The search might take you through countless nooks and crannies, but each one that comes up empty serves to reduce the number of nooks and crannies remaining to look.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jun-2002
Come-from-behind success
Research can be as dramatic as a sports tournament. Even if you are off to a slow start, your team still can show a strong performance in the playoffs. The discovery of the bottom quark, found twenty-five years ago at Fermilab, is a case in point.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Jun-2002
Have doubly-charmed baryons been discovered?
On May 31, 2002, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-5861
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
A deep sense of place
If Gertrude Stein had ever visited this far northeastern corner of Minnesota, she probably would have written about the Soudan region in the same way she did about Oakland, California: "There is no there, there" But that's all right, because the people up here like it that way. And they'd know that Gertrude Stein never worked in a mine. Most people up here have, one time or another, often through more than one generation, and often through lean times.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
Extended family?
On Friday, May 31, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Time for communicators to catch up
In high-energy physics, we are accustomed to dealing with paradoxes. We build huge detectors for tiny particles. Studying the infinitesimally small contributes to our understanding of the farthest reaches of the universe. But we have created for ourselves a paradox that produces internal friction and heat, yet precious little light. Although we are outstanding collaborators, we don’t communicate with a unified voice.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Diggin in
Miners of the S.A. Healy company are carrying out the final excavation work for a new underground facility at Fermilab that could easily store thousands of cars, neatly lined up and stacked on top of each other. Physicists will use the new caverns to build a research laboratory called Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI).

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Beam me up
Marking the completion of its detector with a final cup of ultra-pure mineral oil—the last of 250,000 gallons of this translucent liquid—MiniBooNE is about to start the quest to repeat the landmark result of the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-May-2002
Charged Up - There's nothing neutral about Boris Kayser
Kayser, 63, is an overtly enthusiastic particle physics theorist whose eyebrows and voice rise in proportion to his excitement. He joined the staff of Fermilab's theoretical physics department in October 2001, with the title of Fermilab distinguished scientist. He brought with him more than a decade of academic research, and three decades at the National Science Foundation (NSF). As Fermilab undertakes its neutrino detection and oscillation experiments with MiniBooNE and MINOS, Kayser hopes for a confrontation with big questions.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

2-May-2002
Interactions: the un-common language of science
FermiNews presents an ongoing series dedicated to issues and opportunities in communicating high-energy physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
The question
This response to a Fermilab employee's email examines the reasons why particle physics research is done and how both Fermilab particle physicists and others perceive its value for our nation and the world.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Mar-2002
'Dear Monica...'
Monica Charpentier, a junior at Dulaney High School in Timonium, Maryland submitted a question about the property of charge. "Just what is it?" she wanted to know. Her query found its way to Fermilab theorist Andreas Kronfeld, who welcomed the opportunity to follow her questions and insights to succeeding levels of complexity.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Mar-2002
Exploring the invisible universe
Scientists at Fermilab are deeply involved in unraveling the secrets of this invisible universe. An experiment called the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search looks for new types of particles that could be building blocks of dark matter. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has begun to record a detailed three-dimensional map of the sky, providing vast amounts of data on clusters of galaxies that seem to harbor black holes and dark matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Mar-2002
A new generation of supercomputers
Using paper and pencil, theorists have captured new ideas, revealed intricate mathematical relations and carried out page-long calculations. But times have changed. For many applications, physicists now prefer to attack their models and equations with the best computers available. The Fermilab theory group became one of the top players in the area of computational physics with the installation of a supercomputer called ACPMAPS in 1989.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Tevatron luminosity makes an uphill climb
Collider Run II at Fermilab's Tevatron officially began on March 1, 2001. Since Tevatron operations resumed in November, 2001, after a two-month shutdown for accelerator and detector upgrades, luminosity has increased more slowly than hoped for. Fermilab has in place a plan to raise the luminosity to the desired levels by the end of 2002.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Painless physics: a particle dialogue
What are electrons, protons and neutrons, how do we define them, how do they fit into the theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model—and how do we use them to explore the subatomic world?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Recycling antimatter becomes reality
Antimatter is arguably the rarest stuff Mother Nature provides here on earth. Created in high-energy particle collisions, antiparticles quickly disappear by reacting with ordinary matter. Using powerful accelerators, physicists have learned to produce and control tiny amounts of antimatter. Scientists at Fermilab are now taking a new approach to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for antimatter: they will recycle antiprotons.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 96 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map