U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 76-100 out of 100 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

15-Mar-2002
A new generation of supercomputers
Using paper and pencil, theorists have captured new ideas, revealed intricate mathematical relations and carried out page-long calculations. But times have changed. For many applications, physicists now prefer to attack their models and equations with the best computers available. The Fermilab theory group became one of the top players in the area of computational physics with the installation of a supercomputer called ACPMAPS in 1989.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Tevatron luminosity makes an uphill climb
Collider Run II at Fermilab's Tevatron officially began on March 1, 2001. Since Tevatron operations resumed in November, 2001, after a two-month shutdown for accelerator and detector upgrades, luminosity has increased more slowly than hoped for. Fermilab has in place a plan to raise the luminosity to the desired levels by the end of 2002.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Painless physics: a particle dialogue
What are electrons, protons and neutrons, how do we define them, how do they fit into the theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model—and how do we use them to explore the subatomic world?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Recycling antimatter becomes reality
Antimatter is arguably the rarest stuff Mother Nature provides here on earth. Created in high-energy particle collisions, antiparticles quickly disappear by reacting with ordinary matter. Using powerful accelerators, physicists have learned to produce and control tiny amounts of antimatter. Scientists at Fermilab are now taking a new approach to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for antimatter: they will recycle antiprotons.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Neutrino measurement surprises Fermilab physicists
Experimenters at Fermilab's NuTeV (Neutrinos at the Tevatron) experiment measured the ratio of two types of particles—neutrinos and muons—emerging from high-energy collisions of neutrinos with target nuclei.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
A clear view
It is as translucent as glass. It comes by train, two railcars every week. Fermilab will receive 250,000 gallons of it, enough to fill a 25-meter swimming pool. What is it? Some of the clearest mineral oil available in the country, intended for the MiniBooNE experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Dec-2001
Advanced computing and high energy physics for the 21st century
Through the SciDAC awards, Fermilab will receive approximately $1.28 million a year for the next three years as a participant in three nationwide collaborations: the Particle Physics DataGrid; Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology; and the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
But enough about high-energy physics...
As U.S. high-energy physicists chart the course for their future, they must first reach agreement among themselves on a road map to the revolutionary new physics that nearly all agree lies ahead.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Afterglows, the hard way
Combining the newest of astronomical instruments with the most venerable techniques of patient attention to detail, scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of Chicago and other institutions believe they have made the first optical observation of a gamma ray burst afterglow unprompted by prior observation of the gamma ray burst itself-a so-called "orphan afterglow."

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Nov-2001
NSF grant triggers wide computing possiblities form BTeV
Everybody talks about crashing computers, but nobody does anything about them. But with a $4.98 million National Science Foundation grant in the area of Information Technology Research, Fermilab's B-physics at the Tevatron experiment (BTeV) just might help solve the puzzle of "Why don't things always work as well as we'd like?"

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Run II well under control
On March 1, Collider Run II began at Fermilab. It is a six-year enterprise to produce a record number of proton-antiproton collisions using the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Tevatron.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
A case of identity: Kerberos
Question for our time: Who are you, and can you prove it? Increasingly, the computing solution for these questions in these times is Kerberos, a system of "strong authentication" for computer users invented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and already operating at many universities and several Department of Energy national laboratories.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Sep-2001
The last universal physicist
On the occasion of his one hundredth birthday, we honor a great scientist who was born in Italy, made immense and lasting contributions to the birth of modern physics, and emigrated to the United States, where he carried out experiments and theoretical studies that ushered in the atomic age.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for healing
Discoveries in physics have helped forge dramatic advances in cancer treatment for over a century. In 1950-54, according to the National Cancer Institute, the five-year survival rate for all cancers was 35 percent; by 2000 it was 59 percent. With early detection and treatment, the five-year survival rate for screenable cancers is now 80 percent.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for the future
The future of accelerator physics isn't just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow's discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for biomedical research
At the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Neutrons against cancer
The idea to build a Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab developed in the early 1970s when physicians and physicists shared a vision: to wield accelerator technology to combat cancer. Today, more than 3,100 patients have come to Fermilab in the hope of finding a cure for some of the worst tumors known in the medical field.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for diagnosis
Advances in technology for medical diagnosis have created extraordinary new capabilities for imaging the human body. Many of medicine's most powerful diagnostic tools incorporate technology that physicists originally developed to explore the fundamental nature of matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Interdependent sciences: Physics and medicine
Many diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that have revolutionized medicine are also symbols of the interdependence of the physical and biomedical sciences. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neutron Therapy are just two of the prominent examples of the successful collaboration among innovative medical researchers, physical scientists and engineers.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Dec-2000
The stuff that came in from the cold
Despite the best efforts of particle physicists and astrophysicists, most of the Universe is still missing. We know where it is, but we don't know what it is. It is all around us, but we can only see it by looking far, far away. That is the challenge for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS).

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 100 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map