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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 56 stories.
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22-Sep-2014
Research pinpoints role of 'helper' atoms in oxygen release
Experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve a long-standing mystery in the role calcium atoms serve in a chemical reaction that releases oxygen into the air we breathe. The results offer new clues about atomic-scale processes that drive the life-sustaining cycle of photosynthesis and could help forge a foundation for producing cleaner energy sources by synthesizing nature's handiwork.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Sep-2014
SLAC scientists win prizes for X-ray laser work
Three scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory received international prizes for their achievements in free-electron laser science, a field that has rapidly accelerated since the launch of SLAC's X-ray laser five years ago.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Sep-2014
Plastics in motion: Exploring the world of polymers
In an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory using SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, scientists unraveled the complex behavior of polystyrene, a popular polymer found in packing foams and plastic cups, with a sequence of ultrabright X-ray laser pulses. Their work is detailed in the Aug. 11 edition of Scientific Reports.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Sep-2014
SLAC welcomes photon science faculty member Young S. Lee
SLAC's newest faculty member, Young S. Lee, studies the most unusual materials in the most down-to-earth possible way: He and his colleagues make pure crystals of minerals and other compounds and then test them for useful quantum properties, such as the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Sep-2014
Scientists map protein in living bacterial cells
Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with an X-ray laser, could allow scientists to explore some components of living cells as never before. The research, published Aug. 18 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Sep-2014
Researcher wins x-ray science award for SSRL work aiding chemistry studies
Chris Pollock, a postdoctoral researcher at The Pennsylvania State University, whose research at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was key in adapting an X-ray technique to probe chemical bonds in new ways, has been named the latest recipient of an annual scientific award.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Aug-2014
SLAC summer institute students take a close look at dark matter
Physicists have good reason to believe 85 percent of the matter in the universe is currently undetectable. But not being able to see it didn't keep students at the 42nd SLAC Summer Institute, held at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, from learning about it.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Aug-2014
Ying Diao honored with 2014 Spicer Award for her work at SSRL
Ying Diao, a SLAC/Stanford postdoctoral researcher who brought key innovations to a printing technique for flexible electronics, solar panels and other uses, has been selected to receive this year's William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Aug-2014
SLAC secures role in energy frontier research center focused on next-generation materials
The Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will play a key role in a research consortium that seeks out new materials for next-generation solar panels, low-energy lighting and other uses.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Apr-2014
Scientists capture ultrafast snapshots of light-driven superconductivity
A new study, based on an experiment at SLAC's X-ray laser, pins down a major factor behind the appearance of superconductivity -- the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency -- in a promising copper-oxide material.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Apr-2014
'Smart window' material may make better batteries
Windows that darken to filter out sunlight in response to electric current, function much like batteries. Now, X-ray studies at SLAC provide a crystal-clear view into how this color-changing material behaves in a working battery -- information that could benefit next-generation rechargeable batteries.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jan-2014
Protein puzzles and scientific solutions
Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used powerful new capabilities to -- for the first time -- generate a complete 3-D model of a protein without making use of any previous clue to its structure.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Jan-2013
'Egg-cellent' world-record battery performance
SLAC and Stanford scientists have set a world record for energy storage, using a clever "yolk-shell" design to store five times more energy in the sulfur cathode of a rechargeable lithium-ion battery than is possible with today's commercial technology.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jul-2011
Transparent batteries: Seeing straight through to the future?
SLAC and Stanford researchers have invented a transparent lithium-ion battery that is also highly flexible. It is comparable in cost to regular batteries on the market today, with great potential for applications in consumer electronics.

Contact: Melinda Lee
melinda.lee@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8547
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jul-2011
Turning data into wild rides through dark domes
Thanks to scientists at SLAC and Stanford, planetarium audiences can fly through an increasingly realistic cosmos. A show now playing in San Francisco is a case in point. Unlike shows of a decade ago, all the animations are based on real scientific data – including visualizations made by researchers at KIPAC, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology.

Contact: Melinda Lee
mtlee@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8547
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Oct-2010
Creating order from chaos at the LCLS
In the world of physics, where everything tends toward disorder, researchers working on the Linac Coherent Light Source are seeking perfect order. Many experiments at the pioneering machine will require each molecule in a puff of gas to align with all of the others, creating a uniform field of molecules on which tests can be conducted.

Contact: Communications Office
www-today@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Feb-2009
The secrets of Darwin's dinobird
For centuries, the field of archaeology has depended on what's visible to the naked eye. Now, researchers are revealing what lies beneath the surface of a key evolutionary fossil, Darwin's "dinobird."

Contact: SLAC Office of Communications
650-926-8703
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Dec-2007
How cagey electrons keep hydrated
Water, despite its essential role in nature, remains a deeply mysterious substance. A long list of water's unusual properties tantalizes researchers even today, and scientists at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and around the world are using X-rays to help address these questions. Working with SSRL scientist Anders Nilsson, researcher Dennis Nordlund and colleagues are turning up new clues, and their latest results are published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Neil Calder
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

6-Jan-2006
The search for extra dimensions
Although we now think of the universe as three bulky, nearly-flat dimensions, we might soon discover that the fabric of space-time consists of many more dimensions than we ever dreamed.

Contact: Kelen Tuttle
650-926-2585
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Nov-2005
Meet the grid
Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Nov-2005
Biological tubes to serve as miniature drug capsules
By mixing two common cell ingredients, scientists have assembled tiny hollow tubes whose ends can be open or closed, giving them great potential to serve as drug capsules thousands of times thinner than a human hair, but still 10 times wider than a gene.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

12-Oct-2005
Super-fast super-sensitive detectors
Only detectors with the greatest precision capabilities will measure up to the machine seeking to explore supersymmetry, dark matter, the Higgs mechanism, and new physics that hasn't yet been imagined. Their shapes and configurations might be familiar, but their inner workings–the materials and electronics charged with creating views of new physics–will carry a symbolic branding: "Product of the 21st century."

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
In their hands: The future of particle physics
Particle physics is at a critical time, and its future depends on how well scientists can make their case to a diverse National Academy of Sciences panel.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

Showing stories 1-25 out of 56 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 > >>


 

 

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