U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 47 stories.
1 | 2 > >>

16-Apr-2014
Scientists capture ultrafast snapshots of light-driven superconductivity
A new study, based on an experiment at SLAC's X-ray laser, pins down a major factor behind the appearance of superconductivity -- the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency -- in a promising copper-oxide material.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Apr-2014
'Smart window' material may make better batteries
Windows that darken to filter out sunlight in response to electric current, function much like batteries. Now, X-ray studies at SLAC provide a crystal-clear view into how this color-changing material behaves in a working battery -- information that could benefit next-generation rechargeable batteries.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jan-2014
Protein puzzles and scientific solutions
Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used powerful new capabilities to -- for the first time -- generate a complete 3-D model of a protein without making use of any previous clue to its structure.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Jan-2013
'Egg-cellent' world-record battery performance
SLAC and Stanford scientists have set a world record for energy storage, using a clever "yolk-shell" design to store five times more energy in the sulfur cathode of a rechargeable lithium-ion battery than is possible with today's commercial technology.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jul-2011
Transparent batteries: Seeing straight through to the future?
SLAC and Stanford researchers have invented a transparent lithium-ion battery that is also highly flexible. It is comparable in cost to regular batteries on the market today, with great potential for applications in consumer electronics.

Contact: Melinda Lee
melinda.lee@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8547
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jul-2011
Turning data into wild rides through dark domes
Thanks to scientists at SLAC and Stanford, planetarium audiences can fly through an increasingly realistic cosmos. A show now playing in San Francisco is a case in point. Unlike shows of a decade ago, all the animations are based on real scientific data – including visualizations made by researchers at KIPAC, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology.

Contact: Melinda Lee
mtlee@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8547
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Oct-2010
Creating order from chaos at the LCLS
In the world of physics, where everything tends toward disorder, researchers working on the Linac Coherent Light Source are seeking perfect order. Many experiments at the pioneering machine will require each molecule in a puff of gas to align with all of the others, creating a uniform field of molecules on which tests can be conducted.

Contact: Communications Office
www-today@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Feb-2009
The secrets of Darwin's dinobird
For centuries, the field of archaeology has depended on what's visible to the naked eye. Now, researchers are revealing what lies beneath the surface of a key evolutionary fossil, Darwin's "dinobird."

Contact: SLAC Office of Communications
650-926-8703
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Dec-2007
How cagey electrons keep hydrated
Water, despite its essential role in nature, remains a deeply mysterious substance. A long list of water's unusual properties tantalizes researchers even today, and scientists at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and around the world are using X-rays to help address these questions. Working with SSRL scientist Anders Nilsson, researcher Dennis Nordlund and colleagues are turning up new clues, and their latest results are published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Neil Calder
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

6-Jan-2006
The search for extra dimensions
Although we now think of the universe as three bulky, nearly-flat dimensions, we might soon discover that the fabric of space-time consists of many more dimensions than we ever dreamed.

Contact: Kelen Tuttle
650-926-2585
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Nov-2005
Meet the grid
Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Nov-2005
Biological tubes to serve as miniature drug capsules
By mixing two common cell ingredients, scientists have assembled tiny hollow tubes whose ends can be open or closed, giving them great potential to serve as drug capsules thousands of times thinner than a human hair, but still 10 times wider than a gene.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

12-Oct-2005
Super-fast super-sensitive detectors
Only detectors with the greatest precision capabilities will measure up to the machine seeking to explore supersymmetry, dark matter, the Higgs mechanism, and new physics that hasn't yet been imagined. Their shapes and configurations might be familiar, but their inner workings–the materials and electronics charged with creating views of new physics–will carry a symbolic branding: "Product of the 21st century."

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
In their hands: The future of particle physics
Particle physics is at a critical time, and its future depends on how well scientists can make their case to a diverse National Academy of Sciences panel.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
The compact linear collider
As the Global Design Effort for the proposed International Linear Collider starts to take shape, an international collaboration of scientists simultaneously works on an alternative linear collider technology that pushes physics and engineering to the edge.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

8-Jul-2005
Office of Science Director Orbach outlines bright future for SLAC
Raymond Orbach, director of the Office of Science at the Department of Energy, lavished praise on SLAC's past accomplishments and promising future during a special address Thursday on the Lab's Green.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Apr-2005
Ultra-fast science succeeds at SLAC
The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) collaboration has published data from the first experiments ever using a linear accelerator-based femtosecond x-ray source, and has developed an important tool for ultra-fast science. SPPS makes the world's shortest bunches of electrons in the SLAC linear accelerator and turns them into very bright pulses of x-ray light one thousand times shorter than those made in synchrotron rings like SPEAR3.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Apr-2005
Director of global design effort announced at international linear collider workshop
The 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop kicked off March 18 by announcing the director for the newly formed Global Design Effort (GDE) for the proposed electron-positron collider.

Contact: Heather Rock Woods
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Apr-2005
X-ray blaze on an invisible world
The way that a horse trots intrigued Leland Stanford. After a term as California's governor and with a fortune assembled from building the US transcontinental railway, Stanford lived the life of a country gentleman near his Palo Alto Stock Farm.

Contact: Heather Rock Woods
hrwoods@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Apr-2005
Science from a hole in the ground
When Alice famously went down the rabbit hole, she ended up in Wonderland. Now, a group of US scientists from fields as diverse as microbiology and particle physics, rock mechanics and molecular evolution are proposing to go down their own version of the rabbit hole into the scientific wonderland of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

31-Mar-2005
Understanding the mysteries of high-temperature superconductors
High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) operate in mysterious ways, but scientists are starting to understand their peculiarities by using a state-of-the-art spectroscopy system at SSRL.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Mar-2005
SPEAR3 'breathes' in response to temperature changes
As the sun rises each day, warming the grounds and buildings of SLAC, the entire SPEAR3 facility expands in response. The change is minuscule, on the scale of a few microns--far too slight to observe with the naked eye.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Feb-2005
Cosmic tune-up: Cosmic rays help prime BABAR systems
Cosmic rays harmlessly stream through everything on Earth--our bodies, the scintillator counters in the Visitor's Center and the BaBar detectors.

Contact: The Interaction Point
webmaster@slac.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 47 stories.
1 | 2 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map