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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-47 out of 47 stories.
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22-Feb-2005
NuSTAR satellite approved for further study by NASA
The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite may soon give astrophysicists a new window on the universe. Designed to image high-energy X-ray radiation, it will capture sharp images of black holes, supernovae, and galactic nuclei. And if NASA gives the project final flight approval early next year, it could be in orbit by the end of the decade.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Feb-2005
LCLS collaboration revs up
The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) collaboration met in January to focus on beginning to build the world's first X-ray free electron laser.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Feb-2005
Beyond the standard model
At almost any particle physics conference, meeting, or lunch table, the phrase "physics beyond the Standard Model" is heard over and over again. What's wrong with the Standard Model, anyway? Why are physicists so sure that there is something beyond it? And why do they think they can find it anytime soon?

Contact: John Womersley
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Let it rain
Toward the end of a ten-year experiment in 1991, postdoc Hungye Dai of the University of Utah was puzzling over some really unusual data. The experiment was Fly's Eye, which pioneered a new method of studying ultra-high-energy cosmic rays by monitoring the faint flashes of ultraviolet light produced in the sky when the particles hit the upper atmosphere.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Sold on cold
One hot day in August, particle physicists turned cold. That's the day the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) announced the decision to pursue "cold" superconducting technology for what physicists hope will be the world's next big particle accelerator, the International Linear Collider. Going cold, instead of recommending a "warm" option that had also been under development, has far-reaching consequences for laboratories, scientists, industries and governments across the globe. What does "cold" mean, and why did particle physics choose superconducting technology?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Extreme neutrinos
Kurt Woschnagg has been waiting nine days to catch a plane to the South Pole. He flew for 15 hours from San Francisco to New Zealand, waited several days to spend another eight hours in a cargo plane to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, only to wait again for the weather to clear.

Contact: Katie Yurkewicz
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
The growth of inflation
It was a true Eureka moment if there ever was one. On the night of December 6, 1979, an obscure Stanford Linear Accelerator Center postdoc was up late, sweating over an even more obscure problem about particles called magnetic monopoles. Looking at his calculations the next day, the usually low-key Alan Guth annotated the words "Spectacular Realization" at the top of the page. Guth had discovered cosmic inflation, an idea which some have later called the most important in cosmology since the big bang.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Feb-2005
First GLAST tracker arrives at SLAC
The Gamma Ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) satellite project celebrated a milestone last month with the arrival of the first tracker module at SLAC.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Dec-2004
Fastest gun in the West
SLAC partnered with CalTech, Fermilab, CERN and the University of Florida, along with groups from the UK, Brazil and Korea to defend its title as one of the fastest guns in the West--or, more accurately, the largest bandwidth, which is the computing equivalent.

Contact: SLAC
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Oct-2004
Quenching marital bliss
Niobium, mined in Brazil, needs to be exquisitely purified. It is one of 26 metals in the periodic table with natural superconducting properties.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Oct-2004
When it comes to accelerators, what is cold?
Superconductivity arises in special materials at super cold temperatures. At these temperatures--a few degrees above absolute zero--the materials' electrical resistance virtually vanishes.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Echoes of the past in silicon chips
Thermal oxide is the real on-off switch for your computer. The nanometers-thick film on the surface of silicon transistors helps turn on and off the flow of electricity through the transistor, providing the 0 and 1 binary signals modern electronics run on. There are several million transistors on each computer chip.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Shedding light on luminosity
What on earth is an inverse femtobarn and what does it have to do with the number of events an accelerator produces?Fittingly, it was in the farmlands of the Midwest that the term 'barn' was first applied to physics. In December 1942, at a dinner on the campus of Purdue University, physicists M. G. Holloway and C. P. Parker were lamenting the lack of a catchy name for discussing the size of an atomic nucleus.

Contact: SLAC editorial
tips@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Aug-2004
How many Nobel laureates do you know well enough to nickname?
For Mark Allen (EC), a member of the BaBar collaboration and a graduate student of Aaron Roodman (EC), the answer is now 18. Allen was one of 64 young scientists from the U.S. to attend a five-day symposium of Nobel prize winners in the cobblestoned medieval city of Lindau on a tiny island in the south of Germany. Most of the laureates and researchers who attended this year are, like Allen, physicists.

Contact: SLAC editorial
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Nature's greatest puzzles attract physicists to SLAC summer institute
With youthful enthusiasm, hundreds of scientists will explore Nature's Greatest Puzzles at the SLAC Summer Institute (SSI) on August 2-13.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Jun-2004
Is dark matter actually black?
Gravity is the glue that holds together huge objects such as planets and galaxies. After looking at scores of galaxies, however, physicists realized something was amiss. On the outskirts of rotating galaxies, for example, stars were moving too fast for the galaxies to hold together by the gravity from the stars alone.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Jun-2004
NLC team achieves key milestone for 'warm' linear collider
More than 2,600 physicists agree that the hunt for heavier particles, dark matter and supersymmetry requires an international linear collider (LC)--but the open question is whether to use 'warm' or 'cold' technology to accelerate the electrons and positrons to the massive energies needed.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-May-2004
Let the light shine: SPEAR3 up and running
SPEAR3's shutters are open and users are getting their first taste of work with the completely rebuilt synchrotron radiation facility.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-May-2004
Understanding the structure of liquid water
Physicists of antiquity called it one of nature's fundamental elements; third graders know its chemical formula; and all known forms of life need it to exist.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Mar-2004
In a virtual sky, astronomers find dark matter
Making sense of the data coming from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two main instruments of the GLAST mission, will take highly trained eyes and sophisticated software. Once the NASA probe is in orbit in 2007, astronomers will be able to hit the ground running thanks to three rounds of a simulation drill called Data Challenges, or DC. After six months of preparation, the first round started last December and ended successfully with a SLAC workshop in February.

Contact: Editorial Team
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-May-2003
SLAC experiment identifies new subatomic particle
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's BaBar experiment have identified a new subatomic particle--Ds (2317)--which appears to be an unusual configuration of a "charm" quark and "strange" anti-quark. A scientific paper detailing this discovery has been submitted to Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Aug-2002
A great warship fights on
The best of modern science may save the most glorious of historic wrecks-the 17th century warship Vasa. Using minimally destructive analytical techniques, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) worked with marine conservators from Sweden to discover what's eating the beautiful warship. The results were published in the February 21, 2002, issue of Nature.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 26-47 out of 47 stories.
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