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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-50 out of 59 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

26-May-2007
Berkeley Lab, EPA studies confirm large public health and economic impact of dampness and mold
A pair of studies to be published in the journal Indoor Air have quantified the considerable public health risks and economic consequences in the United States from building dampness and mold.

Contact: Allan Chen
a_chen@lbl.gov
510-486-4210
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

24-Sep-2003
Supernovae shape up for cosmology
A collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the European Southern Observatory, and the University of Texas has yielded the discovery that Type 1a supernovae do not explode spherically. This discovery marks the first time that the intrinsic polarization of a normal Type 1a supernova has been detected.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

19-May-2003
Secrets of drug resistance revealed
Scientists from the DOE Office of Science's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have obtained high-resolution images that offer insight on how bacteria survive attacks from antibiotics. The images were published in the May 9, 2003, issue of Science.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

28-Apr-2003
Phylogenetic shadowing: Apes and monkeys are helping scientists to understand the human genome
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique called "phylogenetic shadowing" that helped them identify a gene, found only in primates, that indicates the risk of heart disease.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
LCYarris@lbl.gov
510-486-6641
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-Jan-2003
Best rookie year ever for a supernova search facility
Researchers at the Nearby Supernova Factory, based at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have discovered 34 supernovae during the system's first year of operation. This discovery was announced at the 201st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January 2003.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

4-Nov-2002
Taking structural biology to a new plateau
As part of a new multidisciplinary structural biology program, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory unexpectedly discovered a protein interface they call the Rad50 "zinc hook," used by an essential protein complex to link broken DNA strands. These first results from the new program were published in the August 1, 2002, issue of Nature.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10-Sep-2002
A thousand years of climate change
Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have just completed a 1,000-year run of a powerful new climate system model on a supercomputer at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
Biosig finds new meaning in microscope images
A team of computer scientists working with cell biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has created BioSig, a web-based bioinformatic system that links collections of microscope images to a wide variety of quantitative experimental data. The new program can be used by multiple researchers to answer questions and test hypotheses about protein expression, cell morphology, and cellular organization in tissues and cell cultures.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-May-2002
The Milano mutation: A rare protein mutation offers new hope for heart disease patients
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered the mechanism by which an extremely rare protein mutation shields people from cardiovascular disease. The discovery could lead to more potent drug therapies that target both cholesterol deposition and prevent future accumulation. Results were reported in the February 12, 2002, issue of the journal Biochemistry.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-May-2002
Two years of SNO prove the case: Solar neutrinos really do change
Most solar neutrinos undergo a metamorphosis during their 93-million-mile journey to Earth, according to results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). This contradicts the predictions of the Standard Model, but explains why experimenters have been able to measure far fewer solar neutrinos than expected.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

14-Apr-2002
DOE science grid
IBM and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) recently announced a collaboration to begin deploying the first systems on a nationwide computing grid that will empower researchers to tackle scientific challenges beyond the capability of existing computers.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
Hand-held radiation detector could outsmart terrorists
Engineers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a 10-pound, battery-powered radiation detector called Cryo3 that is intended to outsmart anyone trying to smuggle radioactive material into the country.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Disorderly superconductors caught in the act
The "granular" nature of superconductivity in underdoped high-temperature superconductors proposed by theorists has had some believers but many skeptics. New observations, reported in the 24 January issue of Nature, may shift how researchers think about these materials.

Contact: Paul Preuss
ul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

3-Dec-2001
Homeland security
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently took information on three projects to DOE headquarters in Washington to brief Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham and Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge. They were part of an exhibition of more than two dozen counter-terrorism technologies sponsored by the DOE.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

26-Nov-2001
New way to make 'neuts'
Neutrons can penetrate deeply to find defects in large machine parts or tiny microdevices, elucidate the structure of biological systems and polymers, sense fluids in geological formations, and probe solids and liquids on the atomic scale.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

5-Nov-2001
A new way to visualize cells and nuclei
To learn how tissues develop and maintain their organization—and especially to learn what goes wrong when cancer strikes—it's essential to study individual cells and their nuclei within tissues. The problem is that in real tissues, and in many cell cultures grown in the laboratory, cells are often tightly clustered; their boundaries and the borders of their nuclei are hard to distinguish.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
World's largest unclassified supercomputer
Scientists at universities and national laboratories across the country are now tapping into the power of the world's largest supercomputer dedicated to unclassified research and have reported important breakthroughs in climate research, materials science and astrophysics.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
Gene-rich pufferfish DNA decoded
Although the Fugu genome contains essentially the same genes and regulatory sequences as the human genome, it carries those genes and regulatory sequences in approximately 365 million bases as compared to the 3 billion bases that make up human DNA. With far less so-called "junk DNA" to sort through, finding genes and controlling sequences in the Fugu genome should be a much easier task.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

8-Oct-2001
Genetic research identifies new risk factor in heart disease
Dr. Edward Rubin, who heads the Genome Sciences Department in the Life Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), and Len Pennacchio, an Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Fellow working in Rubin's research group, led a study in which the new gene—named apoAV—was identified by comparing the DNA sequences of humans and mice. ApoAV's function was tested first in genetically engineered mice then in human clinical studies and shown to significantly influence triglyceride levels in both mammals.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Gravity in large extra dimensions
n 1998, Nima Arkani-Hamed found himself pondering one of the conundrums of modern physics: why is gravity so much weaker than the other fundamental forces? Surrounded by massive objects like falling apples, orbiting moons, and our own occasionally clumsy bodies, we don't think of gravity as weak. Compared to electromagnetism, however-or the aptly named strong force that binds quarks, or even the "weak" force that governs some forms of radioactive decay-gravity is feeble.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Travels of a young physicist
A young physicist recounts his career from the University of California at Berkeley and the laboratories of Alexander Pines, famed pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Tiny particles cause big stir
Emitted as the result of thermonuclear reactions in the core of the sun and supernovae, the ghostlike elementary particles called "neutrinos" usually travel unnoticed through space, in immense numbers and across vast distances. However, the discovery that these erstwhile phantoms have mass and are polymorphous generated substantial notice from the media on Earth.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Microtools for the nanoworld
Most of what we call nanotechnology involves hundreds or thousands of atoms but in a nanometer there's enough room for three atoms. If we are going to achieve real nanotechnology, we are going to have to learn how to put atoms together one at a time.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Beyond alchemy and the Wright brothers: Nanosecrets of everyday things
t's their nanostructure that makes many crucial materials useful, and chemical processes essential to everyday life routinely do their work on the nanoscale. There's a lot more to nanoscience than building itty-bitty widgets. Catalysts are "helper" substances that promote chemical reactions without themselves being consumed. Nature's catalysts, enzymes, assemble only specific end products. Industrial catalysts are rarely so precise.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Dendrimers: Branching out into realms of molecular architecture
Dendrimers may well become the flagship of nanotechnology's building blocks, a class of polymerized macromolecules that have the potential to provide the most exquisitely tailored forms and functions ever realized outside of nature.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 59 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

 

 

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