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Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 65 stories.
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26-Jan-2012
Nanotube 'glow sticks' transform surface science tool kit
Many physical and chemical processes necessary for biology and chemistry occur at the interface of water and solid surfaces. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory publishing in Nature Nanotechnology have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes -- light-emitting cylinders of pure carbon -- have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

28-Aug-2009
Fuel cells transform cars
Lab scientists are refining fuel cell technologies to create amazingly energy-efficient and eco-friendly vehicles.

Contact: Communications Office
505-667-7000
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Nuclear renaissance
Growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are raising concerns of global warming and sparking renewed interest in nuclear power. Unlike coal- and gas-fired power plants, nuclear power plants provide electricity without emitting carbon dioxide. They could also enable a hydrogen economy.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
RAPTOR science
A small robotic observatory system, called RAPTOR, is poised to take movies of fleeting astrophysical events. These movies will help astronomers better understand planetary systems, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Some of RAPTOR's data analysis techniques can also be applied to defense problems.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Stalking the AIDS virus
An improved understanding of the interaction between HIV and the immune system has brought Lab researchers closer to identifying key parameters in AIDS vaccine development.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

25-Jul-2003
Internet speed mark in Guiness World Records Book
Quick now, who holds the land-speed record for sending data over the Internet?

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

17-Jun-2003
At Los Alamos: Guarding the air we breathe
It's a sunny morning in late June. Tourists and locals throng midtown Manhattan, near Central Park South. The air carries a mix of aromas--sweet scents from blossoming trees in Central Park, a potpourri of ethnic foods from nearby restaurants, the pungent blend of sauerkraut and roasting hot dogs from a street vendor. But unscented and unnoted by the crowds, the air is also laced with anthrax spores from a bioterrorist attack.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

4-Jun-2003
Modeling an asteroid impact
Mounting scientific evidence supports the theory that a large asteroid slammed into Earth about 65 million years ago--killing the dinosaurs and ending the Cretaceous Period. Simulations developed at the Laboratory are providing new insight into this catastrophic event.

Contact: William Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

13-May-2003
Proton radiography at Los Alamos
Researchers are now using protons to probe the details of imploding weapon mock-ups. Proton radiography is enhancing the Lab's ability to predict the performance of stockpiled nuclear weapons.

Contact: William Dupuy
wdupuy@earthlink.net
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

16-Apr-2003
Modeling bone remodeling
Los Alamos theoreticians are using algorithms developed in weapons research to understand bone dynamics and abnormalities like osteoporosis.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

3-Apr-2003
Los Alamos' 60th anniversary
As it turns 60 years old, Los Alamos National Laboratory holds a special place in the modern-day genealogy of science and technology, says George "Pete" Nanos, the laboratory's interim director. "We are proud of our accomplishments. However, we will never rest on our laurels or be held motionless by the past."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

2-Apr-2003
Healing or self-damage: Immunoreceptors' 'split personality'
Sometimes described as a "liquid brain," the immune system is continually poised at the edge of disaster, required to aggressively attack invading pathogens without damaging its own body. The challenge of understanding the complexity of signaling entailed in such a delicately balanced system has been taken up by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, who are developing a mathematical model of immunoreceptors, a large and diverse group of proteins that decode regulatory signals.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Mar-2003
Science at Los Alamos
Los Alamos is a laboratory with a mission. It began nearly sixty years ago with the Manhattan Project and the first successful nuclear test at Trinity Site. The Laboratory's mission has evolved through the years, and the Laboratory has evolved with it--but always in response to national needs and with a national security focus.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

24-Mar-2003
Simulation science: The key to understanding national infrastructures
The continuity of American life depends on reliable operation of a complex web of interdependent infrastructures. Disruptions in any one of these could jeopardize our society. A collaboration between Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories is helping policymakers understand how the nation's infrastructures work, are linked, and can be protected.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

24-Feb-2003
Shelf life guaranteed
The nation's nuclear weapons were originally designed to last for 20 to 25 years. Each year, the directors of the Department of Energy's three nuclear weapons labs must certify that the stockpile weapons will perform as designed. If the performance of an older weapon becomes questionable, lab scientists must decide how to replace its aging parts in order to restore its peak performance.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

28-Jan-2003
Los Alamos: Decades of fuel cell research
Fuel cell technology promises to impact environmental and economic issues facing the United States and the world every day. Los Alamos has worked with government and industry on fuel cell and related technology since the mid-1970s.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

16-Jan-2003
'Sound' solutions – for safety, health and security
Want to know what's inside a sealed container? Listen to it. Want to know how to do that? Read on.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

19-Dec-2002
2002: A big year for accomplishments at Los Alamos
In the tradition of "years in review" published nearly everywhere, John Browne, director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has published a sampling of technical accomplishments at this Department of Energy lab during 2002.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

9-Dec-2002
GENESIS’ first year a success
As scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory begin analysis of first-year data from the solar wind probe GENESIS they have determined the spacecraft is working so well that they are considering possibilities for research beyond the planned 2004 mission completion date. Three of GENESIS' instruments were designed and built at Los Alamos.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

9-Dec-2002
Los Alamos announces Homeland Security Center and staff
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Laboratory's Center for Homeland Security will be the key contact point at the Laboratory for organizations seeking scientific and technical assistance in areas related to Homeland Security.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

25-Nov-2002
Los Alamos helps forecast frequency of giant meteors
A system operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and used to "listen" for clandestine nuclear tests has played a key role in helping scientists more accurately determine how often Earth is hammered by giant meteors.

Contact: James Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

29-Oct-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracing biothreats with molecular signatures
For more than a decade, a team of researchers in the DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division has been working to prevent the proliferation of biological weapons. The team has developed a powerful set of tools and techniques for deciphering molecular signatures – genetic patterns that distinguish bacterial species and strains.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

24-Sep-2002
The power of sound: Thermoacoustic mixture separation process moves from science to application
Until recently no one knew that if you put a mixture of two gases in a tube and send a sound wave – a pure tone, not a cacophony – through the mixture, it partially separates with one end of the tube being enriched with one kind of gas and the opposite end enriched with the other.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

5-Sep-2002
At Los Alamos, prior planning facilitated quick 9/11 response
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory didnÕt start thinking about the issue of counter-terrorism on September 12, 2001. ÒThe three National Nuclear Security Administration laboratories have been involved for decades in technology development and problem solving in the realm of arms control and nonproliferation,Ó notes Associate Director for Threat Reduction Don Cobb.

Contact: William Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

3-Sep-2002
Los Alamos: Home to the world’s most powerful controlled-pulse magnet
Over the past 11 years in the world of magnets, The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has gone from being recognized for pulse megagauss explosives field work to being the world leader in pulsed-magnetic-field research and home to the world's most powerful controlled-pulse magnet.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 65 stories.
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