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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-50 out of 65 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

19-Aug-2002
Thirty years after power up
Thirty years ago this summer – in 1972 – the world's most powerful linear accelerator powered up for the first time. When it reached full energy, it generated pulses of 800-million-electron-volt protons at a repetition rate of up to 120 per second and an average current of 1 milliampere. It was the dawn of a new era in nuclear physics.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

12-Aug-2002
Energy-efficient supercomputers
Users of high-performance computers traditionally have focused on the cost of acquiring the big machines instead of the costs of maintenance, power and people. Not so with "Green Destiny."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
New CO2 process for higher-density microchip fabrication
Patented process developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory is designed to remove limits to the superconductor industry's growth while also solving environmental issues.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

22-May-2002
LANSCE builds on 2001 successes as it readies for new run
As researchers at the world’s most powerful linear accelerator prepare for the upcoming run cycle, they look back on a successful 2001 run cycle that produced scores of experimental results for basic and defense science, built key new facilities and instruments and set records for operating efficiency.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
HERPES database online
To aid in the search for cures and vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a publicly available Web database containing the Human herpesvirus 2 genomic sequence.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Research with high magnetic fields
The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory develops for use in basic research the world's most powerful pulsed electromagnets. A super-powerful generator can deliver a pulse equal to more than one million times the magnetic field found naturally on Earth.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracking the identity and origin of biological threats
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northern Arizona University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed sophisticated tools to analyze and identify the DNA of biological threat agents, including those that cause anthrax and plague.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

23-Apr-2002
A nickel's worth of foil helps make antimatter
Making antimatter that can't be seen and that otherwise might not exist, filtering it through a nickel's worth of aluminum foil and then capturing it in a "trap" without walls, has the attention of Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist Michael Holzscheiter.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
dupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

26-Nov-2001
Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measures carbon in soils in a flash
With increasing international concern about greenhouse gases and global warming, scientists have sought better and more cost-effective approaches for measuring changes in the amount of land-based carbon, much of which is located in soils. But because the amount of carbon varies considerably from one spot to the next, measuring significant changes in land-based carbon in fields, ranch lands and forests is difficult.

Contact: James Rickman
elvis@lanl.gov
505-665-9203
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab researcher's team shines in protein folding predictions
The protein folding puzzle – determining the3--D structure of a protein given the sequence of its amino acids – is one of the major unsolved problems in molecular biology. A Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist along with a colleague and his students were recently recognized as the most successful team in an annual worldwide assessment of progress in protein structure prediction.

Contact: Charlie Strauss
cems@lanl.gov
505-665-4838
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Riding the d-wave
A paper appearing in a recent issue of the journal Nature has helped validate a theory on the enigmatic nature of superconducting materials that was first advanced by Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Alexander Balatsky and his colleagues five years ago. The confirmation of the theory is another step in solving the enigma of superconductivity.

Contact: Alexander Balatsky
avb@lanl.gov
505-665-0077
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
The magnetic universe
Researchers in Applied Physics and Theory Divisions have recently compiled a sample of nearly 100 giant radio galaxies powered by black holes.

Contact: Hui Li
li@nis-mail.lanl.gov
505-665-3131
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Researchers find human's earliest ancestor yet
An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of fossil bones and teeth belonging to the earliest human ancestors yet discovered – a hominid who lived in what is now Ethiopia between 5.2 and 5.8 million years ago.

Contact: Giday WoldGabriel
wgiday@lanl.gov
505-667-8749
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab builds world's first neptunium sphere
For the first time ever, a cross-section of nuclear materials scientists and technicians at the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has fashioned an eight- kilogram tungsten-and nickel-clad sphere of neptunium. The actinide metal sphere will be used in criticality safety and nuclear non-proliferation experiments at Technical Area 18, the critical experiments facility.

Contact: Larry Ussery
LUSSERY@LANL.GOV
505-665-0207
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
XMM-Newton makes unusual discoveries in Andromeda Galaxy
In its first look at the Andromeda Galaxy, known as M31, the X-ray multi-mirror satellite observatory has revealed several unusual X-ray sources.

Contact: Sergey P. Trudolyubov
tsp@lanl.gov
505-665-0019
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A new look at old fission mysteries
When theoretical physicist Peter Möller worked on his thesis at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1973, his calculation of the nuclear potential energy for 175 different nuclear shapes, or grid points, pushed the limits of existing computational power. Using one IBM computer punch card to define each grid point, Möller's total input data card deck for the calculation was about one inch thick.

Contact: Peter Moller
moller@lanl.govW
505-665-2210
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
High-temperature superconducting tape licensed
Los Alamos National Laboratory has licensed patents and applications related to its technology for manufacturing high-temperature superconducting tape to IGC-SuperPower of Latham, N.Y., a wholly owned subsidiary of Intermagnetics General Corp.

Contact: Dean Peterson, Brian Newnam
dpeterson@lanl.gov
505-665-3030
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Radiation bystander effects
An important discovery about the effects of low-level radiation on cells is altering long-held beliefs about risk assessment in radiation exposure.

Contact: Bruce Lehnert
lehnert@lanl.gov
505-667-2753
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Stable isotope research resource
The ability to apply research techniques to important problems in biology and medicine depends on the availability of isotopically labeled compounds.

Contact: Clifford Unkefer
cju@lanl.gov
505-665-2560
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Early detection for protection
Being able to rapidly detect biological agents is among the most difficult and yet urgent tasks facing the nation. Whether the threat is from a natural outbreak or a terrorist's release of threat agents, medical treatment cannot effectively begin without first identifying the bioagent. At the same time, effective understanding and response to a biological threat requires rapid communication across the health-care system.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Protein crystallography resource at neutron research center for imaging proteins
Thanks to a $4.8 million capital commitment from the U.S. Department of Energy, Los Alamos researchers have completed a state-of-the-art neutron diffraction station at Los Alamos' Neutron Scattering Center, part of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, known as LANSCE. The new station went on line in December 2000.

Contact: Benno Schoenborn
schoenborn@lanl.gov
505-665-2033
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Shining a light on novel polymers
A rapidly growing field of research, recognized by a 2000 Nobel Prize in chemistry, focuses on electrically conductive plastic, once thought to be an impossibility.

Contact: Liaohai Chen
chen@lanl.gov
505-667-9305
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Biologically inspired nanotechnology
Much of today's scientific revolution is taking place at the nanometer scale. There is growing recognition that an ability to design and manipulate materials at the nanoscale will allow scientists to not only improve existing materials, but also develop entirely new classes of intelligent or "smart" materials for everything from miniaturized laboratories and micro-computers to drug delivery systems. To this end, lessons from biology offer revolutionary approaches.

Contact: Basil Swanson
basil@lanl.gov
505-667-5814
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The who's who of spotted owls
A unique molecular biology study of endangered Mexican spotted owls nesting in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos National Laboratory is being conducted in the Lab's Bioscience Division and has revealed valuable information about levels of genetic diversity present within the owl population.

Contact: Jonathan Longmire
jonlongmire@lanl.gov
505-667-8208
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 65 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

 

 

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