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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 101-125 out of 132 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

1-Oct-2001
Supercomputers look to the stars for answers
To people like astrophysicist Tony Mezzacappa at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, this work is about more than just satisfying their curiosity. The project is aimed at answering some basic questions about the origin of life.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

17-Sep-2001
Mauna Loa CO2 measurements are the longest continuous record in the world
The Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 measurements, which began in 1958, constitute the longest continuous record of atmospheric CO2 concentrations available in the world. The Mauna Loa site is considered one of the most favorable locations for measuring undisturbed air because possible local influences of vegetation or human activities on atmospheric CO2 concentrations are minimal and any influences from volcanic vents may be excluded from the records.

Contact: Robert M. Cushman
cushmanrm@ornl.gov
865-574-4791
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Jun-2001
Keeping trucks and the nation on the road to prosperity
The 21st Century Truck Partnership aims to secure the future of the nation's trucking industry by developing technologies to increase safety, fuel economy, performance, and to lower emissions. It combines the resources and capabilities of the Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, and 16 industrial partners.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Disease detectives
ORNL researchers are developing two types of miniaturized devices for diagnosing diseases. These devices are based on cantilevers and biochips.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Controlling carbon in hybrid poplar trees
ORNL scientists are helping to search for genes that could allow the creation of trees that store more carbon and offer higher-value products.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
A model fish for pollutant studies
The zebrafish is a model organism for studying the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gene and protein expression.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
SNS and biological research
Three world-class biological instruments are being designed for the Spallation Neutron Source. They will help biologists determine the atomic-level structure of proteins and other signaling compounds that allow cells to communicate and coordinate activities across an organism. The research could lead to safer, more effective drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Microbe probe
ORNL researchers are using gene chips, mass spectrometry, and computational analysis to understand what microbe genes do.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Protein prediction tool has good prospects
ORNL ranks high in its ability to computationally predict protein structures. The next step is to speed up predictions to facilitate the search for effective drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Human genome analyzed using supercomputer
A computational analysis of the human genome by ORNL and UT researchers provides insights into what our genes do.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
The mouse house: From old to new
While some ORNL mice are allowed to grow old for studies of aging, mutant mouse embryos are being frozen, awaiting birth after the new Mouse House is built.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Lab on a chip used for protein studies
ORNL's lab on a chip is being used commercially to identify proteins and shows promise for drug discovery and disease screening.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Rapid genetic disease screening possible using laser mass spectrometry
Laser desorption mass spectrometry is emerging as a new tool for screening populations for various genetic diseases

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Protein identification by mass spectrometry
ORNL researchers are improving mass spectrometry tools to speed up protein identification and to screen for disease-causing proteins and bacteria.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Surprises in the mouse genome
In the live organism, not all mouse and human genes have predictable functions, and proteins with similar structures can have different functions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Search for signs of inflammatory disease
You fall on your shoulder and tear some cartilage, causing bone to rub against bone. Your shoulder becomes inflamed and begins to hurt because cytokine, a small signal protein secreted by your immune system, has recruited white blood cells to clean up the damage.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Curing cancer in mice
ORNL researchers have shown that a radioisotope-bearing antibody can target the blood vessels of lung tumors in mice, destroying the tumors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
MicroCAT 'sees' hidden mouse defects
ORNL's X-ray computed tomography system allows internal defects and organ changes in small animals to be mapped.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Obesity-related gene in mouse discovered at ORNL
Some mice born at ORNL have grown dangerously fat, even though they have been on a low-fat diet since birth. Although they do not appear overweight, these mice have a mutated gene that plays a strong role in causing obesity in the form of internal fat deposits that are hazardous to their health.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Mouse models for the human disease of chronic hereditary tyrosinemia
When a section of mouse chromosome 7 containing the coat color c gene is deleted by exposing mice to radiation, "albino" mice are born with a white, hairless coat.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Searching for mouse models of human
Mutant mice are tested by ORNL researchers and their collaborators to determine if these mice have diseases similar to those that afflict humans. Therapies tried on mouse models could lead to new medical treatments.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Gene chip engineers
At ORNL, microarrays are being made faster and cheaper to study gene expression in cells from mice, fish, and other organisms.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Complex biological systems in mice
Using genetic engineering, gene microarrays, and computational technologies, ORNL researchers are deciphering genetic variations in the skin that lead to increased risk of disease from environmental factors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Genes and proteins
Consider a living cell, the fundamental unit of life. Each human cell contains the entire human genome—some 35,000 genes. But only some genes are expressed within a specific cell, resulting in the production of specific proteins. The genes that turn on in a liver cell, for example, are different from the genes that are expressed in a brain cell.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Systems biology
ORNL scientists are conducting research in functional genomics—the study of genomes to determine the biological function of all the genes and their products—and proteomics—the study of the full set of proteins encoded by a genome.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 101-125 out of 132 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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