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Features Archive

Showing stories 126-143 out of 143 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

19-Jun-2001
Surprises in the mouse genome
In the live organism, not all mouse and human genes have predictable functions, and proteins with similar structures can have different functions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Search for signs of inflammatory disease
You fall on your shoulder and tear some cartilage, causing bone to rub against bone. Your shoulder becomes inflamed and begins to hurt because cytokine, a small signal protein secreted by your immune system, has recruited white blood cells to clean up the damage.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Curing cancer in mice
ORNL researchers have shown that a radioisotope-bearing antibody can target the blood vessels of lung tumors in mice, destroying the tumors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
MicroCAT 'sees' hidden mouse defects
ORNL's X-ray computed tomography system allows internal defects and organ changes in small animals to be mapped.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Obesity-related gene in mouse discovered at ORNL
Some mice born at ORNL have grown dangerously fat, even though they have been on a low-fat diet since birth. Although they do not appear overweight, these mice have a mutated gene that plays a strong role in causing obesity in the form of internal fat deposits that are hazardous to their health.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Mouse models for the human disease of chronic hereditary tyrosinemia
When a section of mouse chromosome 7 containing the coat color c gene is deleted by exposing mice to radiation, "albino" mice are born with a white, hairless coat.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Searching for mouse models of human
Mutant mice are tested by ORNL researchers and their collaborators to determine if these mice have diseases similar to those that afflict humans. Therapies tried on mouse models could lead to new medical treatments.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Gene chip engineers
At ORNL, microarrays are being made faster and cheaper to study gene expression in cells from mice, fish, and other organisms.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Complex biological systems in mice
Using genetic engineering, gene microarrays, and computational technologies, ORNL researchers are deciphering genetic variations in the skin that lead to increased risk of disease from environmental factors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Genes and proteins
Consider a living cell, the fundamental unit of life. Each human cell contains the entire human genome—some 35,000 genes. But only some genes are expressed within a specific cell, resulting in the production of specific proteins. The genes that turn on in a liver cell, for example, are different from the genes that are expressed in a brain cell.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Systems biology
ORNL scientists are conducting research in functional genomics—the study of genomes to determine the biological function of all the genes and their products—and proteomics—the study of the full set of proteins encoded by a genome.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Form follows sequence
Powerful new computational tools, such as those available at nersc, are playing a key role in deciphering the molecular dynamics of proteins, including creating "movies" of proteins in motion.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Circuits of a cell
Scientists investigate the biochemical "circuitry" of cells.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@obo.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Picturing proteins
Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques are making it possible for scientists to create 3-D images of protein complexes that are unsuitable for x-ray crystallography.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
The crystal robot
Innovative robotics designed and built by Lab researchers will grow protein crystals for experimentation at a rate once only dreamed of.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
The machinery of life
Scientists are using Berkeley Lab's state-of-the-art imaging resources to gain new insight into the structure and function of proteins, including those involved in cystic fibrosis.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Seeing the cell nucleus in 3-D
A new microscopic program called daVinci is helping researchers better understand how breast cancer develops.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Evaluating vehicle emissions controls
ORNL researchers are developing software tools for supercomputers that will simulate engine exhaust from various lean-burn diesel and gasoline engines as it flows through envisioned catalytic converters designed to chemically transform pollutants into harmless emissions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 126-143 out of 143 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

 

 

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