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Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 137 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

4-Mar-2005
Closer to the customer
Without warning, the August 14, 2003, power blackout removed electricity for millions of people in the United States and Canada. The next day manufacturers still had no power, contributing to an estimated cost to the U.S. economy of $6 billion.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Multiple roads to the hydrogen car
In his 2003 State of the Union address, President George Bush communicated an ambitious vision that the United States will lead the world in developing clean, hydrogen-powered automobiles.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Aid for the auto industry
Since the 1970s the U.S. government has supported research and development designed to help Americans use energy more efficiently. Because a large portion of American oil imports is used for transportation, the Department of Energy makes substantial investments at ORNL in several technologies designed both to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy prophets: US oil dependence
U.S. oil imports are at an all-time high, accounting for approximately 57% of domestic consumption. Americans today import some 12 million barrels per day at a cost that in 2004 skyrocketed above $50 a barrel.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Providing international solutions
As U.S. researchers focus on domestic energy issues, they could easily miss the century's dominant energy challenge: to increase energy supplies for the world's growing population without contributing further to environmental degradation. Accomplishing this monumental task would represent the most fundamental change in the world's energy production since the Industrial Revolution.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy efficiency: Stretching America's resources
The United States and the world face enormous energy challenges. Petroleum prices are at record highs with no end in sight. The emergence of China and India as major contributors to global demand brings new urgency to political and economic concerns about oil dependence.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Piloting the pipeline
R pal. The automated pipeline. Mass spec and proteomics. These phrases are used by ORNL researchers who probe microbes to determine what these "bugs" are made of and what drives them.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Pathways underlying disorders
Abnormalities of the face and skull rank among the most common birth defects in humans. Understanding such complex human disorders requires a systems biology approach, according to Cymbeline Culiat, a molecular geneticist in ORNL's Life Sciences Division.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Sequencing the first tree genome
In 2004 researchers from around the world finished sequencing the complete genome of Populus, the first tree and the third plant to have its molecular "parts list" revealed.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
First, the questions
Scientists believe they are on the brink of solving some mysteries underlying the miracle of life.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
New tools of analysis
In the mid-1990s at Ohio State University, Dorothea Thompson studied a single gene and a single promoter regulating that gene as part of her doctoral thesis research.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Neutron-rich mecca for biologists
Biologists can image proteins using electron and atomic force microscopes. They can visualize the three-dimensional structure of proteins--amino-acid sequences folded in complicated ways--by using X rays at ORNL and other DOE labs.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Progress through computation
If we continue to burn fossil fuels for energy at the current rate, they will last only another few hundred years. In the context of civilization, the fossil fuel era is drawing to a close. In addition, it would be wise to reduce our combustion of oil, gas, and coal because the process produces pollutants that are bad for our health and carbon dioxide that could change our climate in undesirable ways. One possible future source of electricity for the world is fusion energy.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Glimpses of global warming
As greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere, many questions arise concerning how fast and in what ways Earth's environment will change. For example, in the United States, will increased emissions of carbon dioxide from coal combustion in the 21 st century make the Southeast wetter or drier over the next 100 years? Will changes in temperature and moisture conditions make certain U.S. regions more vulnerable to insect-borne diseases?

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Uncovering secrets of living cells
Probing microbes to determine what they are made of and what drives them requires more than mass spectrometers, microarrays, and microscopes. Computational models run on supercomputers have been key contributors to our growing understanding of these single-cell organisms.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Exploring and modeling 21st Century materials
The 1986 discovery of high-temperature superconductivity sparked the quest for room-temperature superconductors that could transmit electrical current without heat losses and without the need for an expensive coolant such as liquid helium. Room-temperature superconductors could make possible ultra-efficient power transmission lines, practical electric cars, and superconducting magnets that could bring high-speed levitated trains and smaller, more efficient, and less costly rotating machinery, appliances, particle accelerators, electric generators, and medical imaging devices.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Tomorrow's molecular and nanoscale devices
Chemists are now about to cross a remarkable threshold and expect a dramatic expansion in their ability to make reliable predictions about molecular structure and processes.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Simulating supernovae
During the catastrophic death throes of massive stars, known as core-collapse supernovae, many elements were created, including those necessary for life on Earth. How and why these stars that were greater than 10 times the mass of our sun and that had evolved over millions of years died explosively in a few hours are mysteries that scientists cannot solve in laboratory experiments. However, simulations on supercomputers hold out hope of unraveling the secrets of supernovae.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Shooting for the moons
Exploring planets beyond Mars will require a power source different from those now deployed in American spacecraft. Radioisotope thermal generators and solar energy cannot meet the challenges posed by proposed missions to the cold, dark regions of our solar system. ORNL engineers are convinced nuclear fission power will.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Getting credit
When nuclear fuel is irradiated, or "burned," in a reactor, its reactivity drops as the uranium fuel is consumed and fission products accumulate. The less reactive the burned, or spent, fuel removed from the reactor, the less likely that the fuel can go critical, or sustain a chain reaction.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Staying In the comfort zone
Randy Nanstad examines the setup for a fracture toughness test of a stainless steel cladding specimen from the Davis-Besse reactor pressure vessel head.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Recovering fuel from waste
The nation's permanent nuclear waste repository could be used more efficiently than currently planned, according to ORNL's Emory Collins. He and his colleagues believe it makes sense for the repository to take mainly nuclear fission products, or 5% of the wastes, and turn away the bulk of the waste--spent nuclear fuel. The usable uranium and plutonium in this material could be extracted, chemically treated, and recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Coming full circle
The resurrection of gas centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment--a dream come true for many Oak Ridge researchers--has brought the largest CRADA ever to ORNL.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
A revolutionary reactor concept
A revolutionary nuclear reactor concept, based partly on ORNL's past coolant and fuel research, could be an economical source of hydrogen. Called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor(AHTR), it would cost only half as much as current gas-cooled reactor concepts.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Can the next generation take the heat?
Oak Ridge National Laboratory has long been a world leader in materials research, and now with the resurgence of interest in nuclear energy, ORNL has a leading role in developing and selecting materials for the next generation of nuclear power plants.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 137 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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