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Features Archive

Showing stories 76-100 out of 133 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

30-Apr-2002
Simulating supernovae on supercomputers
Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae will answer important questions about the creation and dissemination of elements that make life possible. They may also be important in the development of “enabling technologies” for other applications, such as combustion, climate, fusion, stockpile stewardship, and nuclear medicine.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling blood flow during CPR
Thanks to computer modeling, a scientific discovery was made that might lead to a way to save victims of cardiac arrest.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Probing cells by computer
A computational analysis of human and bacterial genomes by ORNL researchers provides insights into what our genes do. ORNL researchers will soon be predicting 100 protein structures a day and evaluating which compounds could make highly effective therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
A National resource at ORNL
Supercomputers at ORNL are enabling scientists in a number of fields to make discoveries that could not be made through either theoretical or experimental research.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL's powerful tools for scientific discovery
ORNL offers 5.5 teraflops of computing to advance scientific discovery. Some ORNL computational research is funded by DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL, IBM, and the Blue Gene Project
ORNL is working with IBM to develop the Blue Gene supercomputer for relating protein shapes to disease.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Evaluating supercomputer performance
In selecting the right machine on which to run a code or the next machine to buy, evaluators of supercomputers focus on many parameters ranging from speeds to terabytes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling magnetic materials
Materials research using supercomputers is paving the way for the next generation of information technology.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Networking: making faster connections among supercomputers
ORNL researchers are devising ways to move large data files faster over computer networks and to reduce delays in data delivery so supercomputers are not idle.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Visualization tools: interacting with data in many dimensions
Visualization tools used in the CAVE™ virtual reality theater at ORNL let scientists interact with predicted phenomena such as stellar explosions and climate changes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Designing electronic devices using supercomputers
A proposed molecular memory cell that would allow laptop computer batteries to last 100 times longer than today’s batteries is being modeled computationally on an IBM supercomputer at ORNL. This machine is also being used to simulate electron transport in carbon nanotubes in contact with other components, for future nanoscale electronic devices.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
International effort to sequence the first tree genome
Cottonwoods, hybrid poplars, and aspens could play a role in improving the environment, displacing imported oil and creating domestic jobs, but first scientists from the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and around the world must sequence the Populus genome.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Present at the Creation
When they synthesized elements 114 and 116, Russian and Livermore scientists confirmed decades-old predictions of the existence of superheavy elements with comparatively long lifetimes.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
From the stone age to the lego block age of computing
The Center for Component Technology for Terascale Simulation Software (CCTTSS), another of ORNL's projects to receive funding from DOE's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program, may well revolutionize the way terascale software simulations are developed.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling and homeland security
ORNL researchers have developed computer-based products that could provide information to help Americans better protect themselves from natural, accidental, or deliberate threats.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Car crash simulations may improve vehicle efficiency
ORNL researchers are building computer models of vehicles made of aluminum, regular steel, high-strength steel, and carbon-fiber composites. This research could lead to safer, energy-efficient cars.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Chemical experiments and predictions by computer
Supercomputers can be used to simulate chemical reactions, saving time and money and increasing safety.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Developing computer tools for scientists
ORNL researchers and their university and national lab colleagues are developing tools to enable scientists to run simulation codes more efficiently on massively parallel supercomputers and clusters of personal computers.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
The science grid
Science grids are being established to connect scientists, instruments, computing, and data.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-Nov-2001
IBM and DOE pool supercomputing talents to examine disease
At the heart of the agreement is IBM's Blue Gene research project, which combines advanced protein science with IBM's next-generation cellular architecture supercomputer design.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
SciDAC DOE initiative targets heart of fusion machine
Fusion energy, evident in the sun and stars, is the ultimate source of power because it provides an environmentally acceptable alternative to energy generated by fossil fuels. To achieve fusion energy requires that the fuel material be heated to hundreds of millions of degrees, much hotter than the sun.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
Cancer-detecting microchip
clever technique for detecting proteins by inducing them to stick to and bend a microscopic cantilever—essentially a diving board the size of a hair—is sensitive enough to serve as a diagnostic assay for the protein markers characteristic of prostate cancer, a team of scientists report in the September issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rls@pa.urel.berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 133 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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