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Features Archive


Showing stories 76-100 out of 147 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


1-Aug-2004
Exploring and modeling 21st Century materials
The 1986 discovery of high-temperature superconductivity sparked the quest for room-temperature superconductors that could transmit electrical current without heat losses and without the need for an expensive coolant such as liquid helium. Room-temperature superconductors could make possible ultra-efficient power transmission lines, practical electric cars, and superconducting magnets that could bring high-speed levitated trains and smaller, more efficient, and less costly rotating machinery, appliances, particle accelerators, electric generators, and medical imaging devices.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Tomorrow's molecular and nanoscale devices
Chemists are now about to cross a remarkable threshold and expect a dramatic expansion in their ability to make reliable predictions about molecular structure and processes.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Simulating supernovae
During the catastrophic death throes of massive stars, known as core-collapse supernovae, many elements were created, including those necessary for life on Earth. How and why these stars that were greater than 10 times the mass of our sun and that had evolved over millions of years died explosively in a few hours are mysteries that scientists cannot solve in laboratory experiments. However, simulations on supercomputers hold out hope of unraveling the secrets of supernovae.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Shooting for the moons
Exploring planets beyond Mars will require a power source different from those now deployed in American spacecraft. Radioisotope thermal generators and solar energy cannot meet the challenges posed by proposed missions to the cold, dark regions of our solar system. ORNL engineers are convinced nuclear fission power will.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Getting credit
When nuclear fuel is irradiated, or "burned," in a reactor, its reactivity drops as the uranium fuel is consumed and fission products accumulate. The less reactive the burned, or spent, fuel removed from the reactor, the less likely that the fuel can go critical, or sustain a chain reaction.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Staying In the comfort zone
Randy Nanstad examines the setup for a fracture toughness test of a stainless steel cladding specimen from the Davis-Besse reactor pressure vessel head.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Recovering fuel from waste
The nation's permanent nuclear waste repository could be used more efficiently than currently planned, according to ORNL's Emory Collins. He and his colleagues believe it makes sense for the repository to take mainly nuclear fission products, or 5% of the wastes, and turn away the bulk of the waste--spent nuclear fuel. The usable uranium and plutonium in this material could be extracted, chemically treated, and recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Coming full circle
The resurrection of gas centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment--a dream come true for many Oak Ridge researchers--has brought the largest CRADA ever to ORNL.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
A revolutionary reactor concept
A revolutionary nuclear reactor concept, based partly on ORNL's past coolant and fuel research, could be an economical source of hydrogen. Called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor(AHTR), it would cost only half as much as current gas-cooled reactor concepts.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Can the next generation take the heat?
Oak Ridge National Laboratory has long been a world leader in materials research, and now with the resurgence of interest in nuclear energy, ORNL has a leading role in developing and selecting materials for the next generation of nuclear power plants.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Fabricating fuels
Over the past decade, increased public pressure to provide more electricity, reduce air pollution, and slow the rate of global warming has led many Americans to revisit the potential of nuclear power to meet anticipated demands for more energy. The Department of Energy and others in the scientific community are interested in adapting the gas-cooled reactor for use both in producing hydrogen for fuel cells to power cars and buildings and in supplying electricity competitively.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Jun-2003
Expecting big things from nanostructures
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to streamline micro-injection--a proven technique for altering the DNA content of a cell--for medical, agricultural, and environmental applications. This research was published in the May 2003 issue of Nanotechnology.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2-Jun-2003
Clustering in universe seen as indicator of galaxy evolution
Researchers at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have discovered surprising new information about how galaxies cluster in space, leading to new information about evolutions of galaxies and matter in the universe. These findings were presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, on May 26, 2003.

Contact: Gary Ruderman
ssdspio@aol.com
312-320-4794
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3-Mar-2003
The next-generation supercomputer
In September 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Cray, Inc., of Seattle, Washington, will deploy Cray's X1 system at ORNL's Center for Computational Science. This next-generation supercomputer will be instrumental in addressing problems related to climate, biology, nanoscale materials, fusion, and astrophysics.

Contact: Cindy Ross Lundy
lundycr@ornl.gov
865-574-1642
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Simulating supernovae on supercomputers
Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae will answer important questions about the creation and dissemination of elements that make life possible. They may also be important in the development of “enabling technologies” for other applications, such as combustion, climate, fusion, stockpile stewardship, and nuclear medicine.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling blood flow during CPR
Thanks to computer modeling, a scientific discovery was made that might lead to a way to save victims of cardiac arrest.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Probing cells by computer
A computational analysis of human and bacterial genomes by ORNL researchers provides insights into what our genes do. ORNL researchers will soon be predicting 100 protein structures a day and evaluating which compounds could make highly effective therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
A National resource at ORNL
Supercomputers at ORNL are enabling scientists in a number of fields to make discoveries that could not be made through either theoretical or experimental research.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL's powerful tools for scientific discovery
ORNL offers 5.5 teraflops of computing to advance scientific discovery. Some ORNL computational research is funded by DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL, IBM, and the Blue Gene Project
ORNL is working with IBM to develop the Blue Gene supercomputer for relating protein shapes to disease.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Evaluating supercomputer performance
In selecting the right machine on which to run a code or the next machine to buy, evaluators of supercomputers focus on many parameters ranging from speeds to terabytes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling magnetic materials
Materials research using supercomputers is paving the way for the next generation of information technology.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Networking: making faster connections among supercomputers
ORNL researchers are devising ways to move large data files faster over computer networks and to reduce delays in data delivery so supercomputers are not idle.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Visualization tools: interacting with data in many dimensions
Visualization tools used in the CAVE™ virtual reality theater at ORNL let scientists interact with predicted phenomena such as stellar explosions and climate changes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 147 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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