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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 101-125 out of 271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

24-Aug-2004
From cosmetics to hydrogen storage—nanoscale materials push the frontier
Suresh Baskaran develops new projects in advanced materials and manufacturing technology. This includes materials and manufacturing technology for new applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion, vehicular structures, sensors and emissions control.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
PNNL co-leads Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, will lead a new national Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The new center is a step toward a "hydrogen economy"--an economy based not on the fossil fuels we use today, but on clean, abundant hydrogen fuels. It is one of three Department of Energy "Centers of Excellence" aimed at enabling use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Rest easy—it's safe and secure
The desk is cleared, the computer is off, and the weekend lies ahead-hit the lights and you are out the door. Not fifteen minutes later you begin to question whether you locked the safe where you store your classified materials--sound familiar? Even the most diligent and security minded personnel have at some time experienced this absent-minded professor syndrome.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Reading, writing and nanoscience?
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has opened its doors to scholars of nanoscience by hosting the new "Intensive Courses in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology." Billed as one of science's hottest and most rapidly evolving fields, nanoscience involves the study of materials and their properties at the molecular level.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Safe harbors in stormy waters
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's expertise in border control training is being tapped to support the Megaports Initiative, a government program aimed at preventing terrorism.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Getting more for your energy buck
As the U.S. attempts to move away from dependence on foreign oil and toward less-polluting forms of energy, converting wasted heat into useful energy is increasingly important. In our country today, as much as 30 percent of the energy involved in large-scale industrial processes is lost through smokestacks. Gasoline and diesel engines lose 35 to 40 percent of their fuel energy in waste heat, primarily in the exhaust.

Contact: Ginny Silman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Nanoparticles may mean longer for enzymes
The biochemical world's workaholic is the enzyme. Enzymes are molecules in cells that lead short, active and brutal lives. They restlessly catalyze their neighbors, cleaving and assembling proteins and metabolizing compounds. After a few hours of furious activity, they are what chemists call "destabilized," or spent.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Spectral library sheds light on chemicals
A chemical's "John Hancock" can give it away. Just as a person's signature is unique and a sure way to weed out imposters and arrive at the truth, a chemical's spectral signature is a trustworthy form of identification. And such revealing information is becoming ever more vital in a world where detection of toxic substances could save lives and the environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
N4 links regional nanoscience and nanotechnology efforts
The Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network--or N4--is magnifying communication about nano-related research in the Pacific Northwest region.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
PNNL and NASA team on fuel cell research
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the NASA Glenn Research Center will collaborate in solving one of the toughest technical challenges to the development of advanced solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The two research organizations have signed a Space Act Agreement to team on the development of sealing technologies for the stacks of SOFCs.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
A genetic sleight-of-wing
Ecologists have come to rely on a tiny fly called the midge as an environmental sentinel--an entomological canary-in-a-coal-mine for rivers. They have learned that a variety of midge species thrive in healthy streams, whereas in polluted water, like that near a lead mine, midge species can dwindle to nothing. So by skimming the skins that pupating midges shed as they enter adulthood, ecologists can attain a cheap snapshot of a stream's living conditions.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Linking environmental issues leads to expanded views
Dr. Marburger sets out a formidable challenge--one that requires fundamental change in the purpose and scope of environmental science. Cleanup isn't enough; we must take a far more proactive view of environmental issues, one that considers the intricate network of ramifications that decisions, missions and activities have on each other and the environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Cleaning up energy production
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are playing a lead role on a combined Department of Energy and industry effort to build a 275-megawatt coal-fired plant that will gasify coal to produce electricity and hydrogen. In that gasification process, carbon dioxide would be captured and sequestered.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Energy moves in new directions
Meeting our needs with cleaner, more efficient energy is absolutely critical to our quality of life. It helps provide for the continued prosperity of the United States as well as helping raise the standard of living in the rest of the world. Energy is important to global and national security and is at the core of DOE's mission.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Bringing data to light
Being able to find the "needle" of information in a "haystack" of millions of words is a capability with many beneficial uses, particularly to secure the homeland. For more than three decades, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an array of information visualization tools to help find that crucial needle in the haystack.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Systems biologists—modern-day Lewis and Clark
I compare PNNL's work with biological systems to the work of explorers--and settlers. We are like the explorers who set out to discover distant places, paving the way for the pioneers who settled them. In traditional biology, we have almost finished cataloging the different parts of living organisms and now we want to integrate what we know. We're ready to build the infrastructure we need to settle certain biological areas.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Science and technology on the front line against terrorism
Winning the war on terrorism and securing the homeland will require innovative science and technology solutions. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is in an excellent position to develop science and technology for strengthening America's ability to defend itself against terrorism.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Advances bring new zest to biological research
The late U.S. President Herbert Hoover once remarked, "New discoveries in science...will continue to create a thousand new frontiers for those who would still adventure." Though we have witnessed significant advances in science and technology, there is much to discover. Each new understanding prompts new questions and challenges.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Critical information for critical situations
Each year, tens of thousands of people around the world die in natural and human-caused disasters. In an emergency, the ability to obtain and track highly dynamic status information is crucial for control rooms, incident command centers (ICCs) and emergency operations centers (EOCs).

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
One person's garbage is another's power
The Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., has turned to the garbage dump to power its operations. One hundred percent of MSL's electrical energy needs now are supplied by "green power" provided by methane gas from a sanitary waste landfill. Green power refers to environmentally preferred power, generated by resources regarded as having certain environmental benefits--such as wind, solar and geothermal.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
PNNL wins record grant for proteomics center
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has won a five-year, $10.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support a center for basic research in proteomics. This is the largest NIH award in PNNL's 38-year history.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Nov-2003
Moving Army logistics forward
As the U.S. Army modernizes its fighting units, it also needs to modernize the way it supports these troops. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff are working with the U.S. Army's Logistics Transformation Agency (LTA) to help transform the way the Army supports our troops.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Nov-2003
Keeping the Army's industrial base healthy
"If the soldier shoots it, drives it, flies it, wears it or eats it, AMC provides it." Army Materiel Command's motto tells it all. AMC is one of three U.S. Army logistics operations supported by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team members on site at AMC in Alexandria, Va.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 101-125 out of 271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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