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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 270 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

5-Jul-2006
PNNL is strong asset for Research District
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has led a team of community partners in using a grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration to hire AngelouEconomics to develop marketing and land-use plans for the 1,600 acres of property in north Richland known as the Research District.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Technology demonstration thwarts fictitious terrorist attack
The pace was intense as data flowed in from sources across the world -- a spike in radiation from a ground-based indicator in Pakistan, an unexplained outbreak of plague in India, and a disturbing convergence of travel plans among suspected terrorists. Information Analysis Center analysts agreed the evidence indicated a well planned terrorist attack was imminent in downtown Seattle. Local law enforcement was quickly dispatched, capturing the suspected terrorists as they attempted to smuggle a chemical and radiation dispersing bomb into the city.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Lightweight materials pave the road for energy-efficient vehicles
In efforts to shorten the long road to fuel efficiency, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to develop cost-effective, high-strength, lightweight materials that will reduce vehicle weight without compromising cost, performance or safety.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Catalysis: The science behind sustainable energy
About 60 percent of the things we wear or use are produced by processes that depend on catalysis. Catalysts are substances that modify chemical reaction rates and remain unchanged afterward. Catalyst technologies affect nearly all areas of the chemical and petroleum industries with an economic impact estimated at more than $10 trillion per year worldwide. Now more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are in demand for new energy production processes to ease the United States' dependence on imported resources.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Fish-friendly solutions
Although turbines have generated power at hydroelectric dams for many years, not much is known about how water flowing through the turbines may harm fish. In efforts to design more "fish-friendly" turbines, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted laboratory experiments to examine the relationship between water velocities within the turbine chambers and injuries to fish.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Jun-2006
"Smart" energy devices + real-time pricing = increased options for consumers
About 200 volunteers in the Pacific Northwest are testing equipment that is expected to make the power grid more reliable while offsetting huge investments in new transmission and distribution equipment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently launched the Pacific Northwest GridWiseTM Testbed Demonstration, a regional initiative to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-375-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Jun-2006
WSU and PNNL break ground on new facility
Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory broke ground April 13, 2006, on the Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory. The BSEL is a $24-million joint effort between WSU and PNNL. Located on the WSU Tri-Cities campus, researchers will use the laboratory to develop processes for converting low-value agricultural byproducts and residues into value-added chemicals for products like plastics, solvents, fibers, pharmaceuticals and fuel additives.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
The sky's the limit
Earth's climate is noticeably changing over time. Glaciers are smaller, droughts last longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods and hurricanes occur more frequently. PNNL researchers involved in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are working to understand these phenomena through improved cloud representations in the computer models that simulate changes in the earth's climate.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Knowledge centers: Sweet suites of informational tools
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has created a new way to manage scientific research and deal with the resulting information overload. Three types of knowledge centers -- science-based, technology-based and mission-based -- are tackling the daunting tasks of collecting, managing, visualizing, analyzing, distributing and storing massive data accumulations using unique software products.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Data-intensive computing to large science discoveries
The advancement in computing technology has enabled scientists to collect massive amounts of data, taking us a step closer to solving complex problems such as global climate change and uncovering the secrets hidden in genes. The exponential growth in the amount of data collected in research, however, has created an urgent technical challenge.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Innovative tools for high-performance computing
Solving complex scientific problems requires not only advanced high-performance supercomputers but also innovative software programs that can discover patterns and integrate data across different space and time scales. Researchers at PNNL are creating innovative software and processes to do just that.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Computational biology enabling new discoveries to solve complex global problems
Ask any experienced do-it-yourselfer or professional and they'll tell you the importance of using the "right tool for the right job." At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD), the right tools are powerful high-speed computer systems that are analyzing vast amounts of data and enabling scientists to discover solutions to many complex global problems.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-375-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Cyber security
Do you worry about the security of your credit card when you buy something over the Internet? Or when you pay your bills electronically? What about business trade secrets communicated by email from engineering to manufacturing staff or sensitive data stored on local hard drives? Computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using a systems approach combined with a multidisciplinary team of experts to address cyber security issues such as these.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Environmental biomarkers provide early warning of disease
Outbreaks of Avian flu or "bird flu" during the past several years have disrupted the poultry industry. More ominous is that the virus spreads to humans. The ability to identify this disease early on may help prevent epidemics that wreak havoc on a country's economy and take lives. Now, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, through the multi-year Environmental Biomarkers Initiative (EBI), are developing new techniques and tools for identifying these early warning signals also known as environmental biomarkers.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Less is more: No-till agriculture helps mitigate global warming
Using research, technology and tractors, farmers around the world are plotting and carrying out a small revolution-a revolution that has the potential to transform agriculture and use it as a tool to mitigate global warming.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Practical climate financing — Using markets to drive cleaner energy production
Every day, people in China get sick just from breathing the air. Many die prematurely. In economic terms, pollution costs China eight to ten percent of gross domestic product in lost productivity, according to World Bank estimates. Air pollution accounts for three-quarters of that productivity loss.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Expecting the unexpected
Discovering unexpected impacts from climate change is something researcher Ruby Leung is getting used to.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Going where no facility has gone before
A data acquisition system is being sent to Niger next year to collect climate information in this data-sparse region as part of a new user facility established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, ARM.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Clouds help clear up global warming questions
Is Earth's climate really changing? Climate researchers have answered this question with a resounding "Yes!" It is widely accepted that Earth's temperature will rise two to three degrees Celsius over the next 50 years if current fossil fuel emissions continue to grow at their present rate. The next question is how this warming trend will affect the climate--particularly water resources.

Contact: Media Relations
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Putting it all together—people, technology, economics—and climate
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's climate research program was created in 1989 in response to a Presidential Initiative called the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The climate research group was formed in two places, with the Richland, Wash., group focusing on physical climate research and the Washington, D.C., group focusing on technology.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-May-2005
Russian government honors PNNL staff for 10 years of service
Ten-year nuclear safety program wraps up with many improvements in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

Contact: Kathy Bryson
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

13-Apr-2005
Partnering paves way for science solutions
The word partnership conjures up the image of a couple--a couple of people, a couple of businesses, a couple of governments--coming together to work on a relationship, business venture or project. Many partnerships are still based on two. But that premise is rapidly changing--especially in science.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

13-Apr-2005
Corporate care for the community
Managing a national laboratory extends beyond serving the scientific and technical needs of clients. It also means serving the needs of the local community. Since 1965, Battelle, which operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy, has contributed more than $13 million in charitable contributions to the communities in which PNNL staff live--Richland, Kennewick, Pasco, Seattle and Sequim, Wash.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Greater security with EM coil
An electromagnetic coil system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory adds truth serum to treaty verification by narrowing the uncertainty for what's inside a sealed container.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Seismic detectives go underground
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using data gathered by seismology stations to develop a mathematical framework for identifying and locating seismological events around the world. Their work, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Ground Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program, will be used by the U.S. government to monitor explosions and weapons tests.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 270 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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