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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 76-100 out of 271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

5-Apr-2005
Seismic detectives go underground
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using data gathered by seismology stations to develop a mathematical framework for identifying and locating seismological events around the world. Their work, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Ground Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program, will be used by the U.S. government to monitor explosions and weapons tests.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
PNNL scientist just keeps on giving
Aaron Diaz, a staff scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is the first PNNL staff member to win a Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award. Diaz also is awarded the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation's Homeland Security Award.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Recycling a legacy of the Cold War
The tons of surplus plutonium stockpiled in the United States and the former Soviet Union are no longer of interest to anyone...except perhaps terrorists. This realization led to an agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation to dispose of 35 metric tons of plutonium each by removing the plutonium "pits" from the nuclear weapons and turning them into nuclear power plant fuel.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Peace of Mind
Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, many Russian weapons scientists frequently found themselves with little work, no pay for the work they were doing and crumbling facilities. Russian and U.S. government officials were concerned that former weapons scientists may be tempted to go to work for countries with active nuclear programs, so they worked together to come up with a way to reduce that incentive.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Education - a key to advancing nonproliferation
Cultivating minds in science and technology has always been a focus at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, but an international need for nonproliferation experts is now a driving force to create new nonproliferation education programs and expand the breadth and depth of existing ones.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2005
Cesium capsules hit cancer harder
A shorter half-life and cesium radiation promise to make cesium-131 capsules harder on cancer and easier on the patient.

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2005
Smart building controls may solve energy problems
Can information technology and smart building controls reduce the need for expensive new electricity transmission lines?

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2005
Science-driven computing speeds up at PNNL
One of the world's fastest scientific computers will be used by a new directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable large-scale scientific discoveries.

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

23-Feb-2005
Catching the cracks
Catching cracks in nuclear nozzles is no easy task when they are caused by normal stresses and corrosion inside a nuclear reactor. Approximately 70 nozzles per reactor allow control rod drive shafts to pass through the top of a reactor pressure vessel head so that the power level of the reactor can be controlled.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2005
Pacific Northwest lab forms Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, names director
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory today launched an $8 million Institute for Interfacial Catalysis to explore the fundamental chemical changes on surfaces where catalytic reactions take place. The Department of Energy lab also announced the appointment of University of Texas at Austin chemist John M. "Mike" White as the institute's director.

Contact: cannon@pnl.gov
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Feb-2005
Nothing is simple for the Center for Global Security
As the saying goes, nothing is ever simple--especially when it involves Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Center for Global Security. Even achieving some progress in solving global security problems often requires a complex and many-pronged effort.

Contact: PNNL Laboratory
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Feb-2005
Virtual goes reality for Microproducts Breakthrough Institute
What has been a virtual institute between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Oregon State University College of Engineering in essence will go "live" today as Dennis Stiles becomes the PNNL program manager for the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute at the Corvallis, Ore. facility.

Contact: Geoffrey Harvey
geoffrey.harvey@pnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Dec-2004
Nonproliferation: Traditional and nontraditional approaches
Tom Shea and Carol Kessler discuss the issues involved in nonproliferation and international nuclear arms.

Contact: PNNL Laboratory
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Landing on it's feet: Hospital reduces patient falls
After accumulating a higher-than-average number of patient falls in recent years, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Pasco, Wash., was able to land on its feet last year with the help of Battelle engineers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
First on the block for first line of defense
Results of the testing will be available to agencies in the business of first response, including law enforcement, fire patrols, hazardous material experts and other emergency first-responders needing specific tools for effective threat detection.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Toxins and pathogens be warned
Imagine munching on a hamburger boldly knowing that it was not contaminated with E. coli or sipping a cold glass of water confident it was truly clean. Due to advances at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, these ideas may become a reality. A team of PNNL researchers is developing a method to detect contaminants in food, water and air supplies.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Keeping the power on by linking the grid
On the afternoon of August 14, 2003, an estimated 50 million people in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and part of Canada suddenly lost electric power in a blackout that lasted up to four days in some areas. The massive outage represented 61,800 megawatts of lost power, cost the United States an estimated $10 billion, and drew attention to a critical need for improved power system reliability.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
PNNL technology closes the 'lid' on Chevy Malibu Maxx
A technology first optimized at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been applied by General Motors to the liftgate of the 2004 Chevy Malibu Maxx.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
Pacific Northwest blazing big trail in small world
Last month's Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference in Portland brought together an amalgamation of national and international technology experts, with organizers hoping to convince them of a large future in the Pacific Northwest for tiny technology.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Fine-tuning carbon nanotubes
Since their discovery in the 1990s, carbon nanotubes have ensnared the imagination of chemists. Among them are researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who are putting these fine filaments--ten-thousand times smaller than a hair--to work as biosensors and improving the way carbon nanotubes can be chemically customized to form the basis for a wide variety of devices.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Mercury—watch out!
An innovative sponge-like material that can "absorb" more than half its weight in contaminants from waste streams has been developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Nanoparticles may mean longer life for enzymes
The biochemical world's workaholic is the enzyme. Enzymes are molecules in cells that lead short, active and brutal lives. They restlessly catalyze their neighbors, cleaving and assembling proteins and metabolizing compounds. After a few hours of furious activity, they are what chemists call "destabilized," or spent.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Thin films enable next-generation displays
You've finished working on your computer and you're ready to call it a day. Instead of logging off and folding the screen down over a laptop keyboard, imagine rolling up the computer screen and stashing it in your bag. Roll-up computer screens and other flexible light-emitting displays that conform to almost any shape or surface may one day be realities thanks to a team of scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Supercritical fluids—making nanoparticles easy
It's not a liquid. It's not a gas. It's a supercritical fluid. Although it looks like a liquid, it has unique properties that allow scientists to work with it in ways they can't with liquids. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using supercritical fluids as solvents in a process that creates nanoparticles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Making light of it
A cadre of researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is laying the groundwork for success with the most promising new lighting technology to emerge since liquid crystal displays (LCD).

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 271 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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