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Features Archive

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22-Mar-2004
CRF - Measuring particulate emissions
The Department of Energy has selected Sandia to lead a Center of Excellence for the development of reversible metal hydrides materials. A key objective will be to develop materials capable of storing hydrogen safely and economically in a vehicle that can run for at least 300 miles before refueling.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

17-Oct-2003
Sandia launches Chem/Bio Program web site
Addressing the need to provide information to the public on an important national security capability, Sandia National Laboratories has launched an external web site devoted to its Chemical/Biological Defense ("Chem/Bio") program.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

15-Aug-2003
Microfluidic device rapidly captures and releases proteins
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory have developed a microdevice that can easily collect and release proteins in aqueous solution in under a second. The small, portable prototype device shows promise in the biotechnology arena, with capabilities targeted at near-instantaneous analysis of suspect proteins and compatibility with hand-held sensors. This microfluidic device is discussed in the July 18, 2003, issue of Science.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

6-May-2002
Molecular shuttling
The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory researchers observed molecular shuttling on a man-made membrane that mimics cellular behavior. Recurring movements may evolve into rudimentary tools of nanoconstruction. These observations were published as the cover story in the April 30, 2002, issue of the chemical and biophysics journal Langmuir.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

14-Jan-2002
Sandia 'detective' solves strange case
It was a small problem: a layer of water lying flat instead of slightly bumpy as it froze on a solid. It became a larger problem when no one could explain why that might happen. The slight difference between experimental results and established expectations might have meant nothing. But possibly it was signaling a basic scientific misunderstanding concerning the interaction of water with solids -- an area of major industrial and scientific concern.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

3-Dec-2001
Nanoskin
These self-assembling nanostructures—as durable as seashells—may lower costs by reducing the need for expensive manufactured devices like stress detectors, chemical analyzers, and thermometers.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

10-Sep-2001
Nanotemplates for nanostructures
Coffee beans spilled upon a table form no pattern—they're a mess—their distribution dictated by the laws of chance. The same was generally believed true of atoms deposited upon a substrate. The first vision of a peaceable kingdom in which deposited atoms form orderly, controllable 2-D nanopatterns has been observed by researchers at the Sandia National Laboratories.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

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