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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 46 stories.
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29-Jun-2012
2011 Thesis Prize winner explores strange matter
Studying the strange side of nuclear physics has reaped Biplab Dey a rich reward: Dey was recently named the winner of the 2011 JSA Thesis Prize.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jun-2012
Snubbed protons tattle on neutron structure
Protons and neutrons are the fraternal twins of the sub-atomic world and the building blocks of all atomic nuclei. While similar in many respects, it's their differences that give them their unique properties. Now, scientists are exploiting these differences to gain deeper insight into these fundamental particles that build our visible universe.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Nov-2011
Scientist wins energy award at technology event
Xin Zhao has won a World Technology Network award in the individual Energy category for innovative work of "the greatest likely long-term significance" in his field. Zhao designed and patented a supercapacitor that would use graphene. The invention could someday see batteries in electric vehicles and similar devices boosted or replaced by high-power, high-capacity, fast-charge/discharge energy storage systems using graphene.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-868-0742
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

10-Nov-2011
Building block detectors for plants
While a plant's overall health can often be determined through simple observation, researchers sometimes need to see what's happening on the inside. That's where Jefferson Lab group leader Drew Weisenberger and his colleagues come in. They are working to develop tools that can image inside plants.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Jul-2011
Result tickler: Lead nucleus may bury positive side under neutral facade
Results from the Lead (Pb) Radius Experiment (PREx), performed last year at Jefferson Lab, suggest that the nucleus of a lead atom buries its positive "personality" beneath a neutral exterior. The preliminary result is consistent with the idea that neutrons form a kind of "neutron skin" around the protons in the nucleus in heavy nuclei. It is important for understanding heavy nuclei and for theoretical equations that describe the life cycles of neutron stars.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Jun-2011
Odd particle left out in the cold
The old saying birds of a feather flock together may also be true for the smallest bits of matter. According to a study recently published in Physical Review Letters, like particles inside protons and neutrons band together, leaving the odd one out.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

6-Oct-2008
Bright light/dark matter: Free-electron lasers enter the realm of particle physics
While two accelerators have been operating at Jefferson Lab for more than a decade, only one was known for its research probing the particles that make up our universe. But things have changed. A particle physics experiment recently performed with Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser, powered by the lesser-known and smaller accelerator, has had its results published in Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

2-May-2008
'Skinny' pions sail through nucleus
A recent Jefferson Lab experiment may have demonstrated the onset of color transparency for pions, a necessary ingredient for interpreting related experimental results in nuclear and particle physics. The experiment was performed in Jefferson Lab's Experimental Hall C.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

31-Jan-2008
Spin in the neutron
Physicists were in a whirl after measurements in the '80s revealed that the spins of the individual building blocks of the proton don't add up to the proton's actual spin. The so-called "proton spin crisis" spurred efforts to pin down where protons -- and neutrons -- get their spin. Pioneering measurements in Jefferson Lab's Hall A have opened the door for measuring some suspected sources of the neutron's spin.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

16-Oct-2007
Energy savings deeply rooted at Jefferson Lab
When it comes to energy savings, Jefferson Lab has given a new meaning to dirt cheap. The lab uses a geothermal well system to control heating and cooling on two floors of one wing of its main administrative building. The wing, known as the F Wing, is a three-story, 61,000-square-foot addition that was constructed in 2005.

Contact: Dean Golembeski
deang@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

14-Aug-2007
Using generalized particle distributions: Research collaboration seeks 3-D image of the proton
A computed tomography -- CT -- scan can help physicians pinpoint minute cancer tumors, diagnose tiny broken bones and spot the early signs of osteoporosis. Now physicists are using the principles behind the procedure to peer at the inner workings of the proton. In a recent experiment, members of Jefferson Lab's Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering collaboration found that it will be possible to construct three-dimensional images of the building blocks of the proton.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

14-Aug-2007
Studying the universe through pions
Pions are some of matter's simplest particles. They're built from the same building blocks as protons and neutrons -- quarks. The pion is the simplest particle built of quarks. The quarks are "glued" together by the strong force -- a fundamental force of nature that also binds quarks to form protons and neutrons. Studying the simple pion and its properties can reveal information about matter in the universe, where it came from and how it's held together.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

7-Aug-2007
Scientists study how the strong force builds the lightest particle made of quarks -- the pion
In Jefferson Lab's Hall C, an international collaboration of nuclear physicists, the Fpi collaboration, is studying how the strong force combines nature's fundamental building blocks into the lightest particle built of quarks -- the pion.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

31-Jul-2007
Reaching new heights in accelerator technology
The International Linear Collider is designed to collide high-energy electrons with high-energy positrons (electrons' antimatter counterparts). Once built, the ILC will serve as a powerful tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions of the 21st century -- regarding the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time, dark matter, dark energy and extra dimensions.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

31-Jul-2007
Exploring the universal glue
In Jefferson Lab's Hall C, an international collaboration of nuclear physicists, the Fpi collaboration, is studying how the strong force combines nature's fundamental building blocks into the lightest particle built of quarks: the pion.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

19-Jul-2007
Researchers' hottest new laser beams 14.2kW
On Oct. 26, Free-Electron Laser (FEL) team members knew they were within reach of a goal they'd pursued for two years. They were aiming to produce 10 kW of laser light at an infrared wavelength of 1.61 microns. On that day, they blew past the milestone to produce 11.7 kW. Just four days later, on Oct. 30, they coaxed another two kW out of the machine setting the record even higher at 14.2 kW.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

9-Jul-2007
Lab enhances scientific data sharing with cutting-edge connection
In early 2005, researchers affiliated with Hall B wanted to transfer raw data from a recent experiment from the tape silo to computers offsite -- a task that without interruption would have taken the Lab's existing network connection almost seven days. Jefferson Lab's newly upgraded network connection is able to transfer data at a rate of up to 10 Gigabits per second, so that same transfer can now be completed in just 2.5 hours.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2007
Innovative energy-saving process earns Jefferson Lab Team a 2007 White House Award
A series of innovative energy-saving processes invented by engineers at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility today were celebrated with a prestigious White House Closing the Circle Award during ceremonies in Washington, DC.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2007
Big bite is reborn
At Jefferson Lab's recent Users Meeting, DOE's Dennis Kovar and NSF's Brad Keister emphasized the funding agencies' commitment to pursuing a cohesive nuclear physics research program in the United States. For instance, Jefferson Lab is funded by DOE; however, NSF provides for many of the Lab's Users and students and some of the instrumentation used in experiments, such as the recently upgraded BigBite spectrometer.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

8-Aug-2006
CEBAF's beam polarization gets a boost
In the last year, the polarization of CEBAF's electron beam has increased by more than 10 percent to over 86 percent polarization. This vast improvement in polarization, or the percentage of electrons spinning in one direction, has reduced the amount of beam time needed to complete precision experiments like G-Zero and HAPPEx. It's the result of work by the Electron Gun Group, which has spent the last two years pushing the boundaries of photocathode physics.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

8-Aug-2006
Jefferson Lab's newest cluster computer takes shape
Unlike a regular computer -- whose "brain" consists of one or perhaps two processors -- a cluster computer's brain can contain hundreds or even thousands of individual processors, called nodes -- all wired together. To solve a problem, the cluster splits the problem into parts, and each node computes its designated part and shares the result with other nodes to produce the final solution.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

4-Aug-2006
Determining how spin arises in the nucleon
In scattering experiments, the momentum transferred to a nucleon target from the incident electron is a primary characteristic of the interaction. Large momentum transfer reactions probe the fundamental quarks and gluons (collectively known as partons) that make up the nucleon.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

30-Jul-2006
Hypernuclei at Jefferson Lab
In 1827, Robert Brown observed that pollen grains floating in a drop of water jiggled constantly. The phenomenon became known as Brownian motion. Over 75 years later, Einstein proposed that the pollen grains were being jostled by the molecules of water. The impurity (pollen grains) Brown had added to the water allowed Einstein to deduce the presence of individual water molecules and describe at least one of their properties.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

28-Jul-2006
Spin identity
Spin is an essential and fascinating phenomenon in the physics of elementary particles. Spin was first defined by Goudsmit and Uhlenbech in 1925, and has played a dramatic role in elementary particle physics, sometimes refuting theories and at other times supporting them. During Experiment E99-117 at Jefferson Lab, an international collaboration collected precision data on the spin of the neutron. Results from this experiment provide evidence that our current understanding of spin is not totally valid.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

25-Jul-2006
Using instrumentation built in collaboration with JLab
College of William & Mary (CWM) scientists have found that an equivalent dose of potassium iodide five times higher than the FDA-recommended dose for humans, in the event of a nuclear accident, is needed to protect small animals effectively from radioactive iodide in medical imaging procedures. This study was performed as part of a long-term animal nuclear imaging project conducted by of biology, physics and applied science researchers from CWM and Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing stories 1-25 out of 46 stories.
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