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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-33 out of 33 stories.
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28-Jul-2006
Spin identity
Spin is an essential and fascinating phenomenon in the physics of elementary particles. Spin was first defined by Goudsmit and Uhlenbech in 1925, and has played a dramatic role in elementary particle physics, sometimes refuting theories and at other times supporting them. During Experiment E99-117 at Jefferson Lab, an international collaboration collected precision data on the spin of the neutron. Results from this experiment provide evidence that our current understanding of spin is not totally valid.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

25-Jul-2006
Using instrumentation built in collaboration with JLab
College of William & Mary (CWM) scientists have found that an equivalent dose of potassium iodide five times higher than the FDA-recommended dose for humans, in the event of a nuclear accident, is needed to protect small animals effectively from radioactive iodide in medical imaging procedures. This study was performed as part of a long-term animal nuclear imaging project conducted by of biology, physics and applied science researchers from CWM and Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Pocket-sized physics detector does big science
How do quarks and gluons, the elementary constituents of all matter, combine to form the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom? This is a fundamental unsolved question in nuclear physics that researchers at Jefferson Lab are working to answer. The internal structure of the proton has been studied for several decades, and scientists have learned a great deal. However, much less is known about the structure of the neutron.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Spin structures of protons and neutrons
Just as a top spins on a table, the tiny quarks inside protons and neutrons also spin. Now a complex calculation by theoretical nuclear physicists at Jefferson Lab has revealed that a quark's spin may be altered by the surroundings of the proton or neutron in which it resides. This surprising result, recently published in the journal, Physical Review Letters, may lead to new insights about how ordinary matter is constructed.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
On the leading edge
The Accelerator Division's Institute for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Science & Technology is a world leader in SRF accelerator technology research and design. Now the newest idea out of the Institute may revolutionize the way accelerating cavities are produced -- making the manufacturing process faster and cheaper, while producing cavities that could potentially outperform any other niobium cavities ever tested.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Big Bite does its stuff
Jefferson Lab's core mission is to study the heart of ordinary matter: the nucleus of the atom. Now Hall A has a new magnet and detector system designed to help physicists look at the nucleus in a whole new light. "BigBite" has debuted in its first experiment at Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Detector Group builds imaging device for German Research Center
Jefferson Lab Detector Group members traveled to Heidelberg, Germany, to assemble and bring on-line a small-animal imaging device the group developed and built for the German Cancer Research Center. Work on the project began in June 2004. The device is similar other small animal imaging gamma cameras developed by the Detector Group; however, this imager design is based on a new concept developed by Vladimir Popov which resulted in highly improved detector performance.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2006
G-Zero update
In research performed in Hall C, nuclear physicists have found that strange quarks do contribute to the structure of the proton. This result indicates that, just as previous experiments have hinted, strange quarks in the proton's quark-gluon sea contribute to a proton's properties. The result comes from work performed by the G-Zero collaboration, an international group of 108 physicists from 19 institutions, and was presented at a Jefferson Lab physics seminar on June 17.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-2689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing stories 26-33 out of 33 stories.
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