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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-50 out of 53 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

1-Apr-2002
New standard in sensor technology
The Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and the University of Michigan integrated basic research in two separate areas—organic light-emitting devices and fluorescent sensors—to develop an innovative new OLED/optical chemical sensor with possible wide-ranging applications such as medical testing, drug discovery, and pathogen detection.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
State-of-the-art magnetoelectronics lab puts Ames Lab on thin-film fast track
Tucked away in a small laboratory space on the second floor of Metals Development is new, state-of-the-art research equipment that should help boost Ames Lab researchers David Jiles and John Snyder to the forefront of thin-film research and the newly emerging field of magnetoelectronics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

7-Jan-2002
New magnetic refrigerator
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator. The refrigerator was developed by Milwaukee-based Astronautics Corporation of America as part of a cooperative research and development agreement with Ames Laboratory.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
EDM cuts cleaner, smoother
The Charmilles Technologies Robofil 290 Wire Electrical Discharge Machine, or EDM for short, uses an electrical spark delivered by a fine wire to cut through any material that conducts electricity.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
BAM continues amazing development
A material that rivals industrial diamond in hardness continues to amaze the researchers who developed it and attract interest from a variety of industrial sectors. The material represents a breakthrough technology that could have a substantial impact on the machining industry, which spends $300 billion each year in labor and overhead in the United States alone.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Building on success
When researchers at Ames Laboratory developed a compact laboratory furnace, it marked a huge leap forward in the ability to understand what happens to a material's crystal structure as the material is heated and cooled. That success has led to the building of two additional furnaces for other DOE laboratories and a refined design intended to make the furnace easier to operate.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
'Fast-talking' clusters
Researchers at Ames Laboratory's Scalable Computing Lab have extended their investigation into communication technology for cluster computers thanks to a National Science Foundation Major Research Instrument grant awarded to Iowa State University's Center for Physical and Computational Mathematics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Dirty coal, clean power
Iver Anderson thinks the solution to the rolling power blackouts in California and parts of the East Coast may lie under the rolling black soil of Iowa’s farm country. "Iowa is sitting on top of huge deposits of coal," says Anderson, an Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist. "The problem is that it’s high-sulfur, dirty coal." Anderson and colleagues Bob Terspstra and Brian Gleeson are closing in on a new material to filter the nasty ashes and dust that result from burning "dirty" coal.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Molecular roller coaster analyzes compounds
Visualize a pack of various molecules in a compound, all mingling in a solution. Then imagine molecules being whisked away from the crowd, one at a time, into a tiny tube by an invisible force. About halfway through this molecular roller coaster, the molecules are flashed with ultraviolet light beamed through a small window as they scream by. That, in short, describes the operation of a new instrument created by Ed Yeung and his team of researchers at the Ames Laboratory.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Old material makes a new debut
Magnesium diboride is a relatively inexpensive metal compound that can be purchased in powder form from most standard chemical supply companies. Until this year, there was nothing remarkable about it — at least nothing that was known. But the material had never been investigated for superconductivity — whether it had the ability to conduct electricity perfectly, without resistance, when cooled to temperatures near absolute zero (minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit).

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

18-Nov-2001
Ames award-winning technology selected as 2001's 'Most Promising'
The Absorption Detection System in Multiple Capillaries technology, developed by Edward S. Yeung, director of Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences Program, was one of three technologies selected for the Editors' Choice Award from the 2001 R&D 100 Award winners.

Contact: Mary Jo Glanville
mglanvil@iastate.edu
515-294-5635
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Magnetic refrigerator successfully tested
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Yeung's new technology is Editors' Choice
The award-winning technology, Absorption Detection System in Multiple Capillaries, developed by Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been named the Most Promising New Technology by the editors of R&D Magazine.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
A giant among us
Klaus Ruedenberg, an Ames Laboratory senior associate and an Iowa State University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, has been chosen to receive the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Doing what comes naturally
Edward S. Yeung, director of Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences Program and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been selected for the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Chromatography.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Insuring safety in future nuclear power systems
A research project to help ensure the safety of future nuclear power systems is being awarded $940,000 funding for a three-phase project under the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Lab receives three-year funding for computing research
Ames Lab will be able to scale up its efforts to develop advanced scientific computing codes that can take advantage of today's extraordinary progress in computing technology thanks to the Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
R & D 100 Award is fourth for Ed Yeung and 15th for Ames Lab
Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences, has won a 2001 R&D 100 Award for a remarkable advance in chemical separation technology called multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Jul-2001
Building the buckyball -- A bowl at a time
Showing a new, naturally occurring compound to a research chemist is, in a way, like throwing down a gauntlet. The unspoken challenge being issued — create this in the lab. For Peter Rabideau, that gauntlet has been the buckyball. Rabideau, an Ames Laboratory senior chemist, has moved a step closer to meeting that challenge by developing a practical means of producing bowl-shaped segments — buckybowls — that could eventually be pieced together to form the complete ball.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
New life for old scrap
Scott Chumbley and Alan Russell, two Ames Laboratory researchers have refined a process that makes it commercially viable to recover the neodymium from tons of stockpiled magnetic scrap.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-May-2001
MIC researchers escape gravity
Three researchers from IPRT's Microanalytical Instrumentation Center recently flew on NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft to test a new system for determining levels of treatment chemicals in water. It's part of an effort to develop novel instrumentation for monitoring the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Apr-2001
Lab-built components bound for outerspace
Jerry Hand and Jim Safly, two Ames Laboratory machinists , have been busy fabricating components for equipment designed to test and monitor the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2001
Separation technology unites lab, new company
One of Ed Yeung's latest developments — multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection — is an innovation that marks the first time that Yeung has been directly involved in launching a new company based on his technology.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 53 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

 

 

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